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PREFACE.

In presenting a second volume of a popular History of the Southern War for Independence, the author gratefully acknowledges the kind reception by the Southern public of his first volume, the generous notices of the independent Press of the Confederacy, and the encouragement of friends. He has no disposition to entreat criticism or importune its charities. But he would be incapable of gratitude, if he was not sensible of the marks of public generosity which have been given to a work which made no pretensions to severe or legitimate history and ventured upon no solicitations of literary success.

He can afford no better vindication of the character and objects of his work than by quoting here what was prefixed to one of the editions, of his first volume:

"Every candid mind must be sensible of the futility of attempting a high order of historical composition in the treatment of recent and incomplete events; but it does not follow that the cotemporary annal, the popular narrative and other inferiour degrees of history can have no value and interest, because they cannot compete in accuracy with the future retrospect of events. The vulgar notion of history is that it is a record intended for posterity. The author contends that history has an office to perform in the present, and that one of the greatest values of cotemporary annals is to vindicate in good time to the world the fame and reputation of nations."

"With this object constantly in view, the author has composed this work. He will accomplish his object, and be rewarded with a complete satisfaction, if his unpretending book shall have the effect of promoting more extensive inquiries; enlightening the present; vindicating the principles of a great contest to the cotemporary world; and putting before the living generation in a convenient form of literature, and at an early and opportune time, the name and deeds of our people."

Richmond, July, 1863.

CONTENTS.

The New Orleans Disaster...Its Consequences and Effects...Dispatches of

the European Commissioners ...Butler "the Beast"...Public Opinion in Eu-

rope...The Atrocities of the Massachusetts Tyrant...Execution of Mumford...

Lesson of New Orleans...Spirit of Resistance in the South...Change in the

Fortunes of the Confederacy...Two Leading Causes for it...The Richmond

"Examiner"...The Conscription Law... Govern or Brown of Georgia... Re-or-

ganization of the Army...Abandonment of our Frontier Defences...The Policy

©f Concentration...Governor Rector's Appeal...First Movements of the Sum-

mer Campaign in Virginia...The Retreat from Yorktown...Evacuation of Nor-

folk...Destruction of the "Virginia"...Commodore Tatnall's Report...Secre-

tary Mallory's Visit to Norfolk...The Engagement of Williamsburg...The

Affair of Barhamsville...McClellan's Investment of the Lines of the Chicka-

hominy...Alarm in Richmond...The Water Avenue of the James...The Panie

in Official Circles...Consternation in the President's House...Correspondence

between President Davis and the Legislature of Virginia...Noble Resolutions

of the Legislature...Response of the Citizens of Richmond...The Bombard-

ment of Drewry's Bluff...The Mass Meeting at the City Hall...Renewal of

Public Confidence...The Occasions of This...jackson's Campaign In Thi

Valley...The Engagement of McDowell...The Surprise at Front Royal...

Banks' Retreat Down the Valley...The Engagements of Port Republic...Re-

sults of the Campaign...Death of Turner Ashby...Sufferings of the People of

the Valley of the Shenandoah...memoir Of Turner Ashby.

Page 17

CHAPTER II.

The Situation of Richmond...Its Strategic Importance...What the Yankee*

Had Done to Secure Richmond...The Battle Of Seven Pines...Miscarriage

of Gen. Johnston's Plans...the Battles Of The Chickahominy...Storming

of the Enemy's Entrenchments...McClellan Driven from his Northern Line of

Defences...The Situation on the Other Side of the Chickahominy...Magruder'r

Comment...The Affair of Savage Station....The Battle of Frazier's Farm...A

Terrible Crisis...Battle of Malvern Hill...The Enemy in Communication with

his Gunboats....The Failure to Cut him off....Glory and Fruits of Our Victory....

Misrepresentations of the Yankees...Safety of Richmond...The War in Other

Parts of the Confederacy...The Engagement of Secessionville...The Campaign
of the West...The Evacuation of Corinth...More Yankee Falsehoods...Capture

of Memphis...The Prize of the Mississippi...Statistics of its Navigation...Siege

of Vicksburg... Heroism of "the Queen City "...Morgan's Raid into Ken-

tucky...The Tennessee and Virginia Frontier...Prospects in the West...Plan

of Campaign there Page 57

CHAPTER III.

Effect of McClellan's Defeat in the North...Call for more Troops...Why the

North was not Easily Dispirited...The War as a Money Job...Note: General

Washington's Opinion of New England...The Yankee Finances...Exasperation

of Hostilities...The Yankee Idea of a "Vigourous Prosecution of the War"...

Ascendancy of the Radicals...War Measures at Washington...Anti-Slavery

Aspects of the War...Brutality of the Yankees...The Insensibility of Europe...

Yankee Chaplains in Virginia...Seizures of Private Property...Pope's Orders-

in Virginia...Steinwehr's Order Respecting Hostages...The Character and Ser-

vices of General John Pope...The "Army of Virginia"...Irruption of the

Northern Spoilsmen...The Yankee Trade in Counterfeit Confederate Notes...

Pope's "Chasing the Rebel Hordes"...Movement Against Pope by "Stone-

wall" Jackson...Battle Of Cedar Mountain...McClellan Recalled from the

Peninsula...The Third Grand Army of the North...Jackson's Surprise of the

Enemy at Manassas...A Rapid and Masterly Movement...Change of the Situ-

ation—Attack by the Enemy upon Bristow Station and at Manassas Junc-

tion...Marshalling of the Hosts...Longstreet's Passage of Thoroughfare Gap...

The Plans of General Lee...Spirit of our Troops...Their Painful Marches...

The Second Battle Of Manassas...A Terrible Bayonet Charge—Rout of the

Enemy...A Hideous Battle-Feld...General Lee and the Summer Campaign of

Virginia...Jackson's Share in it...Extent of the Great Victory of Manassas...

Excitement in Washington...The Yankee Army Falls Back Upon Alexandria

and Washington...Review of the Situation...Rapid Change in our Military

Fortunes...What the South had Accomplished...Comparison of Material

Strength Between North and South...Humiliating Result to the Warlike Rep-

utation of the North. . . . . . . . .> % Page 83

CHAPTER IV.

Rescue of Virginia from the Invader...Gen. Loring's Campaign in the

Kanawha Valley...A Novel Theatre of the War...Gen. Lee's Passage of the

Potomac...His Plans...Disposition of our Forces...McClellan again at the

Head of the Yankee Army...The Battle Of Boonsboro'...the Capture Of

Harper's Ferry—Its Fruits...The Battle Of SHARPgBURG...Great Supe-

riority of the Enemy's Numbers...Fury of the Battle...The Bridge of Antie-

tam... A Drawn Battle...Spectacles of Carnage...The Unburied Dead...General

Lee Retires into Virginia...McClellan's Pretence of Victory...The Affair of

Shepherdstown...Charges against McClellan...His Disgrace...Review of the

Maryland Campaign—Misrepresentations of Gen. Lee's Objects...His Re-

treat...Comment of the New York "Tribune"...The Cold Reception of the

Confederates in Maryland...Excuses for the Timidity of the Mary landers...

What was Accomplished by the Summer Campaign of 1862...The Outburst

of Applause in Europe...Tribute from the London "Times"—Pu&lic Opinion

in England...Distinction between the People and the Government—The Mask

of England...our Foreign Relations In The War...A Historical Parallel of

Secession...Two Remarks on the "Neutrality" of Europe...The Yankee

Blockade and the Treaty of Paris—The Confederate Privateers—Temper of

the South...Fruits of the Blockade. Page 128

CHAPTER V.

Movements in the West...The Splendid Programme of the Yankees...Ken-

tucky the Critical Point...Gen. Kirby Smith's Advance into Kentucky...The

Battle Of Richmond...Reception of the Confederates in Lexington...Expec-

tation of an Attack on Cincinnati...Gen. Bragg's Plans...Smith's Movement

to Bragg's Lines...Escape of the Yankee Forces from Cumberland Gap...Af-

fair of Munfordsvillc.Gen. Bragg between the Enemy and the Ohio...An

Opportunity for a Decisive Blow...BuelPs Escape to Louisville...The Inaugu-

ration*^ Governor at Frankfort...An Idle Ceremony...Probable Surprise of

Gen. Bragg...The Battle Of PERRYViLLE...Its Immediate Results in our

Favour...Bragg's Failure to Concentrate bis Forces...His Resolution of Re-

treat... Scenes of the Retreat from Kentucky...Errours of the Campaign...A

Lame Excuse...Public Sentiment in Kentucky—The Demoralization of that

State...The Lessons of Submission. . . . . . Page 149

CHAPTER VI.

Our Lines in the Southwest...General Breekenridge's Attack on Baton

Rouge...Destruction of the Ram Arkansas...Gen. Price's Reverse at Iuka...

Desperate Fighting...the Battle Of Corinth...Van Dora's Hasty Exulta-

tions...The Massacre of College Hill... Wild and Terrible Courage of the Con-

federates...Our Forces Beaten Back...Our Lines of Retreat Secured...The

Military Prospects of the South Overshadowed...the Department Of The

Trans-mississippi...Romance of the War in Missouri...Schofield's Order

Calling Out the Militia...Atrocities of the Yankee Rule in Missouri...Robbery

Without "Red Tape "...The Guerilla Campaign... The Affair of Kirksville...

Execution of Col. McCullough...The Affair of Lone Jack...Timely Reinforce-

ment of Lexington by the Yankees...The Palmyra Massacre...The Question

of Retaliation with the South...The Military And Political Situation...

Survey of the Military Situation...Capture of Galveston by the Yankees...The

Enemy's Naval Power...His Iron Gads...Importance of Founderies in the

South...Prospect in the Southwest...Prospect in Tennessee...Prospect in Vir-

ginia...Stuart's Raid into Pennsylvania...Souvenirs of Southern Chivalry...

The "Soft-mannered Rebels "...Political Complexion of the War in the

North...Lincoln's "Emancipation Proclamation"..Jlistory of Yankee Legis-

lation in the War...Political Errour of the Emancipation Proclamation—Its

Effect on the South...The Decay of European Sympathy with the Abolition-

ists... What the War Accomplished for Negro Slavery in the South...Yankee

Falsehoods and Bravados in Europe...Delusion of Conquering the South by

Starvation.. Caricatures in the New York Pictorials...The Noble Eloquence

of Hunger and Rags...Manners in the South...Yankee Warfare...The Desola-

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