Witchcraft and Inquisition in Early Modern Venice

封面
Cambridge University Press, 2011年8月8日
0 書評
In early modern Europe, ideas about nature, God, demons and occult forces were inextricably connected and much ink and blood was spilled in arguments over the characteristics and boundaries of nature and the supernatural. Seitz uses records of Inquisition witchcraft trials in Venice to uncover how individuals across society, from servants to aristocrats, understood these two fundamental categories. Others have examined this issue from the points of view of religious history, the history of science and medicine, or the history of witchcraft alone, but this work brings these sub-fields together to illuminate comprehensively the complex forces shaping early modern beliefs.
 

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內容

Introduction
1
1 Witchcraft and Inquisition in the Most Serene Republic
30
2 Blackened Fingernails and Bones in the Bedclothes
59
3 Appeals to Experts
73
4 Spiritual Remedies for Possession and Witchcraft
96
5 The Exorcists Library
133
6 Not My Profession Physicians Naturalism
149
7 Physicians as Believers
169
8 The Inquisitors Library
196
9 Nothing Proven
219
Conclusion
245
Appendix I
261
Appendix II
263
Bibliography
265
Index
283
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關於作者 (2011)

Jonathan Seitz received his Ph.D. from the Department of the History of Science at the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 2006. He is an Assistant Teaching Professor at Drexel University, where he has lectured since 2006. Seitz's awards include an American Historical Association Schmitt Grant, a Foreign Language and Area Studies fellowship, and a John Neu Wisconsin Distinguished Graduate Fellowship. He researched this book in the libraries and archives of Venice and of the Vatican, supported by a Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation fellowship and a National Science Foundation Dissertation Research fellowship. He has been published in Renaissance Quarterly, Isis, Gender and History, The Sixteenth Century Journal and at H-net.org (H-ITALY).

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