網頁圖片
PDF
ePub 版

*

THE WORKS OF D. L. RICHARDSON.

The following works are obtainable from any Bookseller in Calcutta.
LITERARY LEAVES, OR PROSE AND VERSE.

Second edition, two volumes octavo. There is some fair and just criticism in this volume, an extensive acquaintance with literature, and some very elegant poetry, on the whole showing the author to be person of genius and taste cultivated after the best models.--Gentleman's Magazine

SELECTIONS FROM THE BRITISH POETS,
PREPARED UNDER THE ORDERS OF THE COUNCIL OF EDUCATION.

One Volume, royal octavo.+Upwards of 950 pages.
It is a curious circumstance, and one that deserves to be better known than it is, that
we owe the best anthology of English poetry extant to the press of Calcutta. Leitci
Ritchie's Indian News.

In this work he has built up a beautiful and imperishable monument to his industry ability, good taste and reading. We have no hesitation in saying that no literary ma of the present day could have accomplished the enterprize better. The chronologica series of miniature Memoirs are unparalleled for their completeness. The style in which they are done is truly excellent. Those who are familiar with the writer's prose wil comprehend the extent of the merit of the work, when we say that it is not inferior to the best of the essays and criticisms which

adorn the Literary Leaves.-Atlas.
THE ANGLO-INDIAN PASSAGE:

OR
FOARD FOR THE OVERLAND TRAVELLER.

Second edition.

(WITH NUMEROUS ENGRAVINGS ] His works, written with a care and polish, even now extremely rare among literary men, have in England and in India earned him a well-deserved reputation. The work before us, therefore, will meet with a favourable reception from a large class of readers, on this account. Apart from its style, which we cannot sufficiently praise for its purity and elegance, there is a fund of information and advice in this little book. Mr. Richardson has added to his delightful volume some remarkably polished poems, full of exquisite imagery and tasteful delineation. The Ocean Sketches, especially, are deserv. ing of the highest praise, conveying, as they do, a picture in almost every line. - Sun day Times.

LITERARY CHIT-CHAT; [WITH 100 FAC-SIMILES OF THE AUTOGRAPHS OF EMINENT MEN There is a pleasant lettered ease about the conversations of which the volume mainly consists, a quiet scholar-like elegance, which will recommend it alike to the initiated and the uninitiated, to the man of literature, and to the general reader. Whatever Captain Richardson does, either in prose or poetry, is characterized by an amount of refinement and good taste, such as one rarely meets with in the compositions of contemporary writers. Atlas.

LORD BACON'S ESSAYS, WITH COPIOUS EXPANATORY NOTES POR THE USE OF HINDOO STUDENTS. The present Edition does great credit both to the editor and the publishers.-Morning Chronicle.

The book is well got up, and will be exceedingly useful to the class for whom it is designed, and we beg to give it our humble but hearty support.-Friend of India.

LITERARY RECREATIONS.

ONE VOLUME OCTAVO, 600.CLOSELY PRINTED PAGES His works are truly artistical in the highest sense of the word.-D. L. R. is one of the oldest, staunchest and most valued of our literary men. Though not strictly an oriental writer, he is now our veteran literary representative in the East. He has conferred lasting service on the cause of literature here.—Calcutta Quarterly Review, No. XIX,

NOTICES OF THE BRITISH POETS.

One Volume, Foolscap octavo. They embrace more biographical and critical information than the student of English Literature can find in any single work - Englishman.

[ocr errors]

Coralloted

de Flance

Chercar
FLOWERS

load

AND

FL O W E R-G A RD EN S.

BY

DAVID LESTER RICHARDSON,

PRINCIPAL OF THE HINDU METROPOLITAN COLLEGE,
AND AUTHOR OF “ LITERARY LEAVES," “ LITERARY RECREATIONS,” &c.

[ocr errors]

WITH

Α Ν Α Ρ Ρ Ε Ν DIX

OF

PRACTICAL INSTRUCTIONS AND USEFUL INFORMATION

RESPECTING THE

ANGLO-INDIAN FLOWER-GARDEN.

CALCUTTA:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY D'ROZARIO AND CO. TANK-SQUARE.

MDCCCLY.

SB 406

R52 Jordan 1-15-29 18667

PREFACE.

In every work regard the writer's end,
Since none can compass more than they intend.

Pope. This volume is far indeed from being a scientific treatise On Flowers and Flower Gardens :-it is mere gossip in print upon a pleasant subject. But I hope it will not be altogether useless. If I succeed in my object I shall consider that I have gossipped to some purpose. On several points such as that of the mythology and language of flowers--I have said a good deal more than I should have done had I been writing for a different community. I beg the London critics to bear this in mind. I wished to make the subject as attractive as possible to some classes of people here who might not have been disposed to pay any attention to it whatever if I had not studied their amusement as much as their instruction. I have tried to sweeten the edge of

the cup.

I did not at first intend the book to exceed fifty pages: but I was almost insensibly carried on further and further from the proposed limit by the attractive nature of the materials that pressed upon my notice. As by far the largest portion of it has been written hurriedly, amidst other avocations, and bit by bit, just as the Press demanded an additional supply of

copy," I have but too much reason to apprehend that it will seem to many of my readers, fragmentary and ill-connected. Then again, in a city like Calcutta, it is not easy to prepare any thing satisfactorily that demands much literary or scientific research. There are

R.R.

66

ii

very many volumes in all the London Catalogues, but not immediately obtainable in Calcutta, that I should have been most eager to refer to for interesting and valuable information, if they had been at hand. The mere titles of these books have often tantalized me with visions of riches beyond my reach. I might indeed have sent for some of these from England, but I had announced this volume, and commenced the printing of it, before it occurred to me that it would be advisable to extend the matter beyond the limits I had originally contemplated. I must now send it forth, "with all its imperfections on its head;” but not without the hope that in spite of these, it will be found calculated to increase the taste amongst my brother exiles here for flowers and flower-gardens, and lead many of my Native friends—(particularly those who have been educated at the Government Colleges --who have imbibed some English thoughts and feelings—and who are so fortunate as to be in possession of landed property)- to improve their parterres,---and set an example to their poorer countrymen of that neatness and care and cleanliness and order which may make even the peasant's cottage and the smallest plot of ground assume an aspect of comfort, and afford a favorable indication of the character of the possessor.

D. L. R. Calcutta, September 21st 1855.

a

« 上一頁繼續 »