Writing Indians: Literacy, Christianity, and Native Community in Early America

封面
Univ of Massachusetts Press, 2003 - 224 頁

A study of cultural encounter, this book takes a fresh look at the much ignored and often misunderstood experience of Christian Indians in early America. Focusing on New England missionary settlements from the mid-seventeenth to the early nineteenth centuries, Hilary E. Wyss examines the ways in which Native American converts to Christianity developed their own distinct identity within the context of a colonial culture.

With an approach that weaves together literature, religious studies, and ethno-history, Wyss grounds her work in the analysis of a rarely read body of "autobiographical" writings by Christian Indians, including letters, journal entries, and religious confessions. She then juxtaposes these documents to the writings of better known Native Americans like Samson Occom as well as to the published works of Anglo-Americans, such as Mary Rowlandson's famous captivity narrative and Eleazor Wheelock's accounts of his charity schools.

In their search for ostensibly "authentic" Native voices, scholars have tended to overlook the writings of Christian Indians. Yet, Wyss argues, these texts reveal the emergence of a dynamic Native American identity through Christianity. More specifically, they show how the active appropriation of New England Protestantism contributed to the formation of a particular Indian identity that resisted colonialism by using its language against itself.

 

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內容

LITERACY CAPTIVITY AND REDEMPTION The Christian Indians of King Philips War
17
THINGS THAT D0 ACCOMPANY SALVATION Indian Converts Transculturation and Reculturation
52
CAPTIVITY AND CHRISTIANITY Stockbridge New Stockbridge and the Place of History
81
ONE HEAD ONE HEART AND ONE BLOOD Christian Community and Native Identity at Brotherton
123
A SON OF THE FOREST AND A PREACHER OF THE GOSPEL Narratives of Captivity and Conversion
154

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第 39 頁 - ... one more man besides this one Tom Nepanet, and send with all true heart and with all your mind by two men; because you know and we know your heart great sorrowful with crying for your lost many many hundred man and all your house and all your land and woman child and cattle as all your thing that you have lost and on your backside stand.
第 36 頁 - I am greatly distressed this day on every side ; the English have taken away some of my estate, my corn, cattle, my plough, cart, chain, and other goods. The enemy Indians have also taken a part of what I had ; and the wicked Indians mock and scoff at me, saying, ' Now what is become of your praying to God ? ' The English also censure me, and say I am a hypocrite.
第 31 頁 - That the Heathen People amongst whom we live, and whose Land the Lord God of our Fathers hath given to us for a rightful Possession...
第 190 頁 - The Day-Breaking, if not the SunRising of the Gospel with the Indians in New England, 1647, iv.
第 39 頁 - Lancaster, returned on the 12. following, with a written answer from the enemy, saying,"Wenougtee answer by this one man, but if you like my answer sent one more man besides this one Tom Nepanet, and send with all true heart and with all your mind by two men ; because you know and we know your heart great sorrowful with crying for your lost many many hundred man and all your house and all your land and woman child and cattle as all your thing that you have lost...
第 20 頁 - Wee are oft upbraided by some of our Countrymen that so little good is done by our professing planters upon the hearts of Natives; such men have surely more spleene then judgement, and know not the vast distance of Natives from common civility, almost humanity it selfe...
第 35 頁 - Therein imitating the cuttlefish, which, when it is pursued or in danger, casteth out of its body a thick humor, as black as ink, through which it passes away unseen by the pursuer.

關於作者 (2003)

Hilary E. Wyss is assistant professor of English at Auburn University.

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