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ishment, it seemed desirous of concealing its bloody deeds, and skipped about the chamber in an agony of nervous agitation ; throwing down and breaking the furniture as it moved, and dragging the bed from the bedstead. In conclusion, it seized first the sorpse of the daughter, and thrust it up the chimney, as it was found ; then that of the old lady, which it immediately hurled through the window headlong.

As the ape approached the casement with its mutilated burden, the sailor shrank aghast to the rod, and, rather gliding than clam bering down it, hurried at once home-dreading the consequences of the butchery, and gladly abandoning, in his terror, all solicitude about the fate of the Ourang-Outang. The words heard by the party upon the staircase were the Frenchman's exclamations of horror and affright, commingled with the fiendish jabberings of the brute.

I have scarcely anything to add. The Ourang-Outang must have escaped from the chamber, by the rod, just before the break. ing of the door. It must have closed the window as it passed through it. It was subsequently caught by the owner himself, who obtained for it a very large sum at the Jardin des Plantes. Le Bon was instantly released, upon our narration of the circum. stances (with some comments from Dupin) at the bureau of the Prefect of Police. This functionary, however well disposed to my friend, could not altogether conceal his chagrin at the turn which affairs had taken, and was fain to indulge in a sarcasm or two, about the propriety of every person minding his own business.

“Let him talk,” said Dupin, who had not thought it necessary to reply. “Let him discourse; it will ease his conscience. I am satisfied with having defeated him in his own castle. Never. theless, that he failed in the solution of this mystery, is by no means that matter for wonder which he supposes it; for, in truth, our friend the Prefect is somewhat too cunning to be profound. In his wisdom is no stamen. It is all head and no body, like the pictures of the Goddess Laverna,-or, at best, all head and shoulders, like a codfish. But he is a good creature after all. I like him especially for one master stroke of cant, by which he has attained his reputation for ingenuity. I mean the way he bas de nier ce qui est, et d'expliquer ce qui n'est pas." "*

• Rousseau-Nouvelle Heloise.

THE MYSTERY OF MARIE ROGET:

A SEQUEL TO "THE MURDERS IN THE RUE MOROUE."

Es giebt eine Reihe idealischer Begebenheiten, die der Wirklichkeit parallel

lauft. Selten fallen sie zusammen. Menschen und zufalle modificiren gewo. hulich die idealische Begebenheit, so dass sie unvollkommen erscheint, und ihre Folgen gleichfalls unvollkommen sind. · So bei der Reformation ; statt

des Protestantismus kam das Lutherthum hervor. There are ideal series of events which run parallel with the real ones. They

rarely coincide. Men and circumstances generally modify the ideal train of events, so that it seems imperfect, and its consequences are equally imperfect. Thus with the Reformation; instead of Protestantism came Lutheran. ism.-Novalis.t Moral Ansichten.

THERE are few persons, even among the calmest thinkers, who have not occasionally been startled into a vague yet thrilling halfcredence in the supernatural, by coincidences of so seemingly marvellous a character that, as mere coincidences, the intellect has been unable to receive them. Such sentiments—for the half.

* Upon the original publication of “Marie Rogêt," the foot-notes now appended were considered unnecessary; but the lapse of several years since the tragedy upon which the tale is based, renders it expedient to give them, and also to say a few words in explanation of the general design. A young girl, Mary Cecilia Rogers, was murdered in the vicinity of New York; and, although her death occasioned an intense and long-enduring excitement, tho mystery attending it had remained unsolved at the period when the present paper was written and published (November, 1842). Herein, under pretence of relating the fate of a Parisian grisette, the author has followed, in minule retail, the essential, while merely paralleling the inessential facts of the real niurder of Mary Rogers. Thus all argument founded upon the fiction is appli. cable to the truth : and the investigation of the truth was the object.

The “ Mystery of Marie Roger" was composed at a distance from the sceno o! the atrocity, and with no other means of investigation than the nowspapers

+ The nom de plume of Von Hardenburg.

credences of which I speak have never the full force of thought such sentiments are seldom thoroughly stifled unless by reference to the doctrine of chance, or, as it is technically termed, the Cal. culus of Probabilities. Now this Calculus is, in its essence, purely mathematical ; and thus we have the anomaly of the most rigidly exact in science applied to the shadow aru spiritu. ality of the most intangible in speculation.

The extraordinary details which I am now called upon to make public, will be found to form, as regards sequence of time, the primary branch of a series of scarcely intelligible coinci. dences, whose secondary or concluding branch will be recognized by all readers in the late murder of MARY Cecilia ROGERS, at New York.

When, in an article entitled “The Murders in the Rue Mor. gue,” I endeavored, about a year ago, to depict some very reInarkable features in the mental character of my friend, the Chev. alier C. Auguste Dupin, it did not occur to me that I should ever resume the subject. This depicting of character constituted my design ; and this design was thoroughly fulfilled in the wild train of circumstances brought to instance Dupin's idiosyncrasy. I might have adduced other examples, but I should have proven no'more. Late events, however, in their surprising development, have startled me into some farther details, which will carry with them the air of extorted confession. Hearing what I have lately heard, it would be indeed strange should I remain silent in regard to what I both heard and saw so long ago.

Upon the winding up of the tragedy involved in the deaths of Madame L'Espanaye and her daughter, the Chevalier dismissed the affair at once from his attention, and relapsed into his old habits of moody reverie. Prone, at all times, to abstraction, I readily fell in with his humor; and, continuing to occupy our whambers in the Faubourg Saint Germain, we gave the Future to the winds, and slumbered tranquilly in the Present, weaving the dull world around us into dreams.

afforded. Thus much escaped the writer of which he could havo availed him. self had he been upon the spot, and visited the localities. It may not be improper to record, nevertheless, that the confessions of two persons, (one of them the Madamo Deluc of the narrativo) made, at different periods, long sub. nequent to the publication, confirmed, in full, not only the general conclusioa, out absolutely all the chief hypothetical details by which that conc.usion was attained.

Bul these dreams were not altogether uninterrupted. It may readily be supposed that the part played by my friend, in the drama at the Rue Morgue, had not failed of its impression upon the fancies of the Parisian police. With its emissaries, the name of Dupin had grown into a household word. The simple charac. ter of those inductions by which he had disentangled the mystery never having been explained even to the Prefect, or to any other individual than myself, of course it is not surprising that the affair was regarded as little less than miraculous, or that the Cheva. lier's analytical abilities acquired for him the credit of intuition. His frankness would have led him to disabuse every inquirer of such prejudice ; but his indolent humor forbade all farther agita. tion of a topic whose interest to himself had long ceased. It thus happened that he found himself the cynosure of the policial eyes; and the cases were not few in which attempt was niade to engage his services at the Prefecture. One of the most :emark. able instances was that of the murder of a young girl named Marie Rogêt.

This event occurred about two years after the atrocity in the Rue Morgue. Marie, whose Christian and family name will at once arrest attention from their resemblance to those of the unfor. tunate “cigar-girl," was the only daughter of the widow Estelle Rogét. The father had died during the child's infancy, and from the period of his death, until within eighteen months before the assassination which forms the subject of our narrative, the inother and daughter had dwelt together in the Rue Pavée Saint Andrée ;* Madame there keeping a pension, assisted by Marie. Affairs went on thus until the latter had attained her twenty-sec. ond year, when her great beauty attracted the notice of a perfu. mer, who occupied one of the shops in the basement of the Palais Royal, and whose custom lay chiefly among the desperate adven. turers infesting that neighborhood. Monsieur Le Blanct was not unaware of the advantages to be derived from the attendance of the fair Marie in his perfumery; and his liberal proposals were • Nassau Street.

+ Anderson VOL. 1.-18

accepted eagerly by the girl, although with somewhat more of hesitation by Madame.

The anticipations of the shopkeeper were realized, and his rooms soon became notorious through the charms of the sprightly grisette. She had been in his employ about a year, when her ad. mirers were thrown into confusion by her sudden disappearance from the shop. Monsieur Le Blanc was unable to account for hei absence, and Madame Rogêt was distracted with anxiety and terror. The public papers immediately took up the theme, and the police were upon the point of making serious investigations, when, one fine morning, after the lapse of a week, Marie, in good health, but with a somewhat saddened air, made her re-appear. ance at her usual counter in the perfumery. All inquiry, except that of a private character, was of course immediately hushed. Monsieur Le Blanc professed total ignorance, as before. Marie, with Madame, replied to all questions, that the last week had been spent at the house of a relation in the country. Thus the affair died away, and was generally forgotten; for the girl, osten. sibly to relieve herself from the impertinence of curiosity, soon bade a final adieu to the perfumer, and sought the shelter of her mother's residence in the Rue Pavée Saint Andrée.

It was about five months after this return home, that her friends were alarmed by her sudden disappearance for the second time. Three days elapsed, and nothing was heard of her. On the fourth her corpse was found floating in the Seine,* near the shore which is opposite the Quartier of the Rue Saint Andrée, and at a point not very far distant from the secluded neighborhood of the Barrière du Ronle.t

The atrocity of this murder, (for it was at once evident that murder had been committed,) the youth and beauty of the victim, and, above all, her previous notoriety, conspired to produce in. tense excitement in the minds of the sensitive Parisians. I can call to mind no similar occurrence producing so general and so intense an effect. For several weeks, in the discussion of this one absorbing theme, even the momentous political topics of the day were forgotten. The Prefect made unusual exertions; anci

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