The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, 第 1 卷

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Widdleton, 1871

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用户评价  - Kaethe - LibraryThing

I'm reading the story of Pfaall. I had no idea that Poe had written science fiction about a trip to the moon. Amazing. *** Finished Pfaall, which turns out to be an amusing story, as well as ... 阅读完整评价

LibraryThing Review

用户评价  - Kaethe - LibraryThing

I'm reading the story of Pfaall. I had no idea that Poe had written science fiction about a trip to the moon. Amazing. *** Finished Pfaall, which turns out to be an amusing story, as well as ... 阅读完整评价

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第300页 - And all with pearl and ruby glowing Was the fair palace door, Through which came flowing, flowing, flowing, And sparkling evermore, A troop of Echoes, whose sweet duty Was but to sing, In voices of surpassing beauty, The wit and wisdom of their king.
第460页 - And the seraphs sob at vermin fangs In human gore imbued. Out — out are the lights — out all! And over each quivering form, The curtain, a funeral pall, Comes down with the rush of a storm, And the angels, all pallid and wan. Uprising, unveiling, affirm That the play is the tragedy, 'Man,' And its hero the Conqueror Worm.
第291页 - During the whole of a dull, dark, and soundless day in the autumn of the year, when the clouds hung oppressively low in the heavens, I had been passing alone, on horseback, through a singularly dreary tract of country; and at length found myself, as the shades of evening drew on, within view of the melancholy House of Usher.
第459页 - By a crowd that seize it not, Through a circle that ever returneth in To the self-same spot; And much of Madness, and more of Sin And Horror, the soul of the plot!
第291页 - There was an iciness, a sinking, a sickening of the heart - an unredeemed dreariness of thought which no goading of the imagination could torture into aught of the sublime.
第299页 - ... improvisations), the result of that intense mental collectedness and concentration to which I have previously alluded as observable only in particular moments of the highest artificial excitement. The words of one of these rhapsodies I have easily remembered. I was, perhaps, the more forcibly impressed with it, as he gave it, because, in the under or mystic current of its meaning, I fancied that I perceived, and for the first time, a full consciousness on the part of Usher, of the tottering of...
第294页 - ... house. A servant in waiting took my horse, and I entered the Gothic archway of the hall. A valet of stealthy step thence conducted me, in silence, through many dark and intricate passages in my progress to the studio of his master. Much that I encountered on the way contributed, I know not how, to heighten the vague .sentiments of which I have already spoken. While the objects around me — while the carvings of the ceilings, the sombre tapestries of the walls, the ebon blackness of the floors,...
第305页 - The antique volume which I had taken up was the ' Mad Trist ' of Sir Launcelot Canning : but I had called it a favorite of Usher's more in sad jest than in earnest; for in truth there is little in its uncouth and unimaginative prolixity which could have had interest for the lofty and spiritual ideality of my friend. It was, however, the only book immediately at hand; and I indulged...
第347页 - I have no engagement ; — come." "My friend, no. It is not the engagement, but the severe cold with which I perceive you are afflicted. The vaults are insufferably damp. They are encrusted with nitre.
第346页 - It was about dusk, one evening during the supreme madness of the carnival season, that I encountered my friend. He accosted me with excessive warmth, for he had been drinking much.

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