Letters of Euler on Different Subjects in Natural Philosophy: Addressed to a German Princess

封面
Murray and Highley, 1802
 

大家的评论 - 撰写书评

我们没有找到任何书评。

目录

I
xiii
II
1
IV
5
VI
9
VIII
13
X
16
XII
20
XIII
24
CVII
220
CIX
226
CX
227
CXII
231
CXIV
235
CXVI
238
CXVIII
242
CXX
245

XV
30
XVII
33
XIX
37
XX
41
XXII
45
XXIV
48
XXVI
52
XXVII
55
XXIX
60
XXX
65
XXXII
70
XXXIII
74
XXXIV
79
XXXV
83
XXXVI
87
XXXVII
91
XXXIX
94
XLI
99
XLII
102
XLIV
106
XLV
110
XLVII
116
L
121
LII
115
LIV
115
LVI
125
LVIII
129
LX
134
LXII
140
LXIV
144
LXVI
149
LXVIII
151
LXX
155
LXXII
159
LXXIV
161
LXXVII
164
LXXIX
169
LXXXI
171
LXXXII
175
LXXXIV
179
LXXXVI
182
LXXXVIII
187
XC
188
XCII
193
XCIV
196
XCVI
200
XCVIII
204
C
207
CIII
209
CV
215
CXXII
249
CXXIV
253
CXXV
257
CXXVII
261
CXXVIII
264
CXXX
268
CXXXII
273
CXXXIV
277
CXXXVI
282
CXXXVIII
286
CXL
289
CXLII
293
CXLIV
297
CXLVI
301
CXLVII
304
CXLIX
308
CLI
311
CLIII
315
CLIV
319
CLVI
322
CLVIII
326
CLX
330
CLXII
334
CLXIV
339
CLXV
342
CLXVII
345
CLXIX
349
CLXXI
354
CLXXIII
358
CLXXV
363
CLXXVII
367
CLXXIX
371
CLXXXI
375
CLXXXIII
379
CLXXXV
383
CLXXXVII
387
CLXXXIX
391
CXCI
397
CXCIII
403
CXCV
407
CXCVII
411
CXCIX
415
CCII
419
CCIV
423
CCVI
427
CCVIII
431
CCX
434
CCXII
438
CCXIV
442

其他版本 - 查看全部

常见术语和短语

热门引用章节

第123页 - Sthly, the angle RCF, or SCF, formed by the refracted CR or CS, with the perpendicular CF, is called the angle of refraction. Therefore, because of the bending which the ray of light undergoes, the angle of refraction is not equal to the angle of incidence PCE ; for producing the line PC to Q, the angles PCE and FCQ, being vertical, are equal to each other (Euclid's Elements, Book I., Prob. 15), as you will easily recollect. The angle QCF, then, is equal to the angle of incidence PCE ; therefore...
第340页 - When, therefore, a man addresses to God a prayer worthy of being heard, it must not be imagined that such a prayer came not to the knowledge of God till the moment it was formed. That prayer was already heard from all eternity ; and if the Father of Mercies deemed it worthy of being answered, he arranged the world expressly in favour of that prayer, so that the accomplishment should be a consequence of the natural course of events.
第60页 - ... to us, and even far beyond the height of the loftieft mountains, is a mere nothing, compared to the diftance of the fun, which is about thirty millions of miles.* This is, therefore, a very important difficulty, which we muft endeavour to folve. For this purpofe I begin with remarking, that the rays of the fun do not communicate heat to any bodies, but fuch as do not grant them a free paffage.
第174页 - What hands are here ? ha ! they pluck out mine eyes. Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood Clean from my hand ? No, this my hand will rather The multitudinous seas incarnadine, Making the green one red.
第339页 - He hath given us. Philosophy, on the other hand, instructs us that all events take place in strict conformity to the course of Nature, established from the beginning, and that our prayers can effect no change whatever, unless we pretend to expect that God should be continually working miracles in compliance...
第94页 - According to this opinion, we see the moon and the planets only by the rays of the sun which they reflect; and you must frequently have heard it affirmed, that the light of the moon is a reflection of the light of the sun. In the same manner. say they, the rays of the sun are reflected by the first opaque bodies which are exposed to them, on other bodies of the same nature, and undergo a series of similar reflections, till they are entirely weakened. But however plausible this opinion may at first...
第xvi页 - ... of the ftudy of the elegant and amufing poetical fictions of Antiquity. Without meaning to decry this, may I not be permitted to hint, that it might be of importance frequently to recall young minds from an ideal world, and its ideal inhabitants, to the real world, of which they are a part, and of which it is a fhame to be ignorant. Let your pupil, by all means, read the poets ; let him read Ovid, and, after he has amufed himfelf with the golden age of old Saturn, lead him out into the open firmament...
第31页 - Thus two notes which differ an octave, excite a perception of the relation of i to 2 ; a fifth, of that of 2 to 3 ; and a greater third, of that of 4 to 5. We comprehend then the order which is found in harmony, when we know all the relations which pervade the notes of which it is compofed, and it is the perception of the ear which leads to this knowledge.
第303页 - ... qualities in the highest degree is GOD. There is, then, an infinite difference between body and spirit. Extension, inertia, and impenetrability — qualities which exclude all thought — are the properties of body ; but spirit is endowed with the faculty of thinking;, of judging, of reasoning, of feeling, of reflecting, of willing, or of determining in favour of one object preferably to another. There is here neither extension, nor inertia, nor impenetrability ; these material qualities are...
第337页 - ... were all good : for time is requisite to the formation of evil inclinations: there is, therefore, no difficulty in affirming that God created spirits. But it being the essence of spirits to be free, and liberty not being capable of subsisting without a power to sin, to create a spirit possessed of the power of sinning has nothing inconsistent with divine perfection, because a spirit could not be created destitute of that power. God has...

书目信息