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même le temps de regarder jamais derrière soi. **

“Up! God has form'd thee with a wiser view,
Not to be led in chains, but to subdue ;
Calls thee to cope with enemies, and first
Points out a conflict with thyself the worst !"

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But, even if you have been fortunate in your choice, if you discreetly love, weed at least from your attachment mere sickening romance, and all that unmeaning idealism, of which we have spoken in the foregoing pages.

It is unworthy of either sex, to receive as to offer ; for never was it intended that one creature should give its worship to another. “As if,” indignantly exclaims Bacon, “as if man, made for the contemplation of heaven, and all noble objects, should do nothing but kneel before a little idol, and make himself a subject, though not of the mouth, as beasts are, yet of the eye, which was given him for higher purposes."

Quelle injustice aux dieux d'abandonner aux femmes
Un empire si grand sur les plus belles ames,
Et de se plaire à voir de si fables vainqueurs
Régner si puissamment sur les plus nobles cæurs.

CORNEILLE.
Télémaque.

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(1) “In painting love, with what contrary passions is Sappho moved. As Longinus writes in his work on the

Sublime:

« Ου θαυμάζεις, ώς υπ' αυτό την ψυχήν, το σώμα, τας ακοάς, την γλώσσαν, τάς όψεις, την χρόαν, πάνθ', ώς αλλότρια, διοι. χόμενα επιζητεί, και καθ' υπεναντιώσεις άμα ψύχεται, καίεται, αλογιστεί, φρονεί ; ή γάρ φοβείται, η παρ' ολίγον τέθνηκεν ίνα μή έν τι περί αυτήν πάθος φαίνεται, παθών δε σύνοδος. Πάντα μεν τα τοιαύτα γίνεται περί τους ερώντας

[Translation.] Are you not amazed to find how, in the same moment, her soul, her body, her ears, her tongue, her

eyes, her colour,-are all as much absent from her as if they had never belonged to her? And what contrary effects does she feel together! She burns, she freezes, she raves,—that one would think she was possessed not by one passion only, but that the whole circle of them had made one jarring rendezvous in her breast; all true symptoms of those who are far gone in love.

(2) 'Tis written, among other things, in the fanciful volume of Love, that there is a fate in loving; that particular persons are destined for each other. Hence proceeds Love at first sight,' which ranks among the most favourite phenomena in the extravagancies of this passion. But such ready-made' affection, such a flashy, gunpowder passion is rarely of continuance; it burns much too fiercely. If it rise in a night, like Jonah's gourd, another sun may

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suffice to crush it. Hearts too easily won, are easily deserted. “Hot love, soon cold,” as runs the old adage: that which has been kindled with haste, seldom retains its heat longest. And this kind of love is entirely based on what is perishable; it has beauty for its foundation, Solos formosos amamus, primo velut aspectu.' “We love the beautiful only,” says Isocrates, “at a first glance.”

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(3) Desire the passionate lover to give you a character of his mistress-he will tell you that he is at a loss for words to describe her charms, and will ask you very seriously, if ever you were acquainted with a goddess, or an angel? If you answer that you never were, he will then say, that it is impossible for you to form a conception of such divine beauties, as those which his charmer possesses ; so complete a shape, such well-proportioned features, so engaging an air, such sweetness of disposition, such gaiety of humour. You can infer nothing, however, from all this discourse, but that the poor man is in love; and that the general appetite between the sexes, which nature has infused into all animals, is in him determined to a particular object by some qualities which give him pleasure. The same divine creature, not only to a different animal, but also to a different man, appears a mere mortal being, and is beheld with the utmost indifference."—HUME, Essay xviii.

(4) Our errors may render us amiable. I said one day to a young girl, “If you were but as good as your brother!' * I don't care,' she exclaimed, you would not be so fond of me, if I were !'-Goetue.

(5) Would a disease-smitten beauty still retain attrac

tions for the most ardent lover? A story is told of Raymond Lully, who in his youth became enamoured of a lady, with a tender heart and soul of sensibility, as well as (to all appearance) exquisite beauty of form and feature. She refused his suit; but Lully was not to be repulsed, and played the part of a desperate lover. At length his mistress, protesting that her refusals had cost her as much grief as himself, made the following severe trial of his affection :-uncovering her hosom, she exposed the frightful wounds of a cancer that consumed her. The sight drew tears from Lully, but it extinguished his ardour. He forgot his passion, and afterwards studied philosophy at Paris, with a success well known.

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(6) “ Nemo Amore capitur, nisi qui fuerit ante Forma, specieque delectatus,” says Aristotle ; and Plato defines love,“ pulchræ fruendi desiderium.To the same purport seem several passages in Scripture : “Do we not love a woman who is comely?Many have been deceived by the beauty of a woman, for herewith love is kindled as with fire.” (Were not this the case, a woman advanced in years, who has grown grey in cultivating the amiable and mental qualities, would be the fittest object of love.)

(7) Admiration is a very short-lived passion, that immediately decays upon growing familiar with its object, unless it be still fed with fresh discoveries, and kept alive by a new perpetual succession of miracles rising up to its view.-ADDISON.

(8) There are so many circumstances, perfectly nameless, to communicate to the new-married man the fact, that it is not a real angel of whom he has got the possession ; there suffice to crush it. Hearts too easily won, are easily deserted. “Hot love, soon cold,” as runs the old adage: that which has been kindled with haste, seldom retains its heat longest. And this kind of love is entirely based on what is perishable; it has beauty for its foundation, Solos formosos amamus, primo relut aspectu.' “We love the beautiful only," says Isocrates, “at a first glance."

(3) Desire the passionate lover to give you a character of his mistress,—he will tell you that he is at a loss for words to describe her charms, and will ask you very seriously, if ever you were acquainted with a goddess, or an angel? If you answer that you never were, he will then say, that it is impossible for you to form a conception of such divine beauties, as those which his charmer possesses ; so complete a shape, such well-proportioned features, so engaging an air, such sweetness of disposition, such gaiety of humour. You can infer nothing, however, from all this discourse, but that the poor man is in love ; and that the general appetite between the sexes, which nature has infused into all animals, is in him determined to a particular object by some qualities which give bim pleasure. The same divine creature, not only to a different animal, but also to a different man, appears a mere mortal being, and is beheld with the utmost indifference." —HUME, Essay xviii.

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