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'I did hope that some succeeding lie would have 'superseded the thousand and one which were accu'mulated during last winter. I can forgive whatever may be said of or against me, but not what they make 'me say or sing for myself. It is enough to answer 'for what I have written; but it were too much for 'Job himself to bear what one has not. I suspect that when the Arab Patriarch wished that his " enemy 'had written a book," he did not anticipate his own ' name on the title-page. I feel quite as much bored 'with this foolery as it deserves, and more than I 'should be if I had not a headache.

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'Of Glenarvon, Madame de Staël told me (ten days ago, at Copet) marvellous and grievous things; but I ' have seen nothing of it but the motto, which promises amiably" "for us and for our tragedy." If such be 'the posy, what should the ring be?" a name to all 'succeeding," &c. The generous moment selected 'for the publication is probably its kindest accompani'ment, and-truth to say-the time was well chosen. 'I have not even a guess at the contents, except from 'the very vague accounts I have heard.

'I ought to be ashamed of the egotism of this letter. 'It is not my fault altogether, and I shall be but too happy to drop the subject when others will allow

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'I am in tolerable plight, and in my last letter told you what I had done in the way of all rhyme. I trust 'that you prosper, and that your authors are in good 'condition. I should suppose your stud has received 'some increase by what I hear. Bertram must be a

The motto is

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He left a name to all succeeding times,

'Link'd with one virtue and a thousand crimes.'

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good horse; does he run next meeting? I hope you 'will beat the Row. Yours alway, &c.'

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TO MR. ROGERS.

'Diodati, near Geneva, July 29th, 1816. 'Do you recollect a book, Mathieson's Letters, ' which you lent me, which I have still, and yet hope ' to return to your library? Well, I have encountered

at Copet and elsewhere Gray's correspondent, that 'same Bonstetten, to whom I lent the translation of his correspondent's epistles, for a few days; but all he 'could remember of Gray amounts to little, except that he was the most "melancholy and gentleman"like" of all possible poets. Bonstetten himself is a 'fine and very lively old man, and much esteemed by 'his compatriots; he is also a littérateur of good repute, and all his friends have a mania of addressing to him volumes of letters-Mathieson, Muller the 'historian, &c. &c. He is a good deal at Copet, where I have met him a few times. All there are well, except Rocca, who, I am sorry to say, looks in a very 'bad state of health. Schlegel is in high force, and 'Madame as brilliant as ever.

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LETTER 244.

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'I came here by the Netherlands and the Rhine route, and Basle, Berne, Morat, and Lausanne. I 'have circumnavigated the Lake, and go to Chamouni ' with the first fair weather; but really we have had 'lately such stupid mists, fogs, and perpetual density,

that one would think Castlereagh had the Foreign 'Affairs of the kingdom of Heaven also on his hands. 'I need say nothing to you of these parts, you having ' traversed them already. I do not think of Italy before

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September. I have read Glenarvon, and have also 'seen Ben. Constant's Adolphe, and his preface, deny

ing the real people. It is a work which leaves an unpleasant impression, but very consistent with the consequences of not being in love, which is perhaps as disagreeable as anything, except being so. I doubt, however, whether all such liens (as he calls 'them) terminate so wretchedly as his hero and 'heroine's.

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'There is a third Canto (a longer than either of the 'former) of Childe Harold finished, and some smaller things, among them a story on the Chateau de 'Chillon; I only wait a good opportunity to transmit 'them to the grand Murray, who, I hope, flourishes. 'Where is Moore? Why is he not out? My love to him, and my perfect consideration and remembrances 'to all, particularly to Lord and Lady Holland, and to your Duchess of Somerset. Ever, &c.

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'P.S. 1 send you a fac simile, a note of Bonstetten's 'thinking you might like to see the hand of Gray's correspondent.'

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'Diodati, Sept. 29th, 1816.

I am very much flattered by Mr. Gifford's good 'opinion of the MSS., and shall be still more so if it

answers your expectations and justifies his kindness. 'I liked it myself, but that must go for nothing. The 'feelings with which most of it was written need not be envied me. With regard to the price, I fixed none, but left it to Mr. Kinnaird, Mr. Shelley, and yourself, to arrange. Of course, they would do their best; and as to yourself, I knew you would make no 'difficulties. But I agree with Mr. Kinnaird perfectly, that the concluding five hundred should be only conditional; and for my own sake, I wish it to

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'be added, only in case of your selling a certain n m'ber, that number to be fixed by yourself. I hope this

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is fair. In everything of this kind there must be ' risk; and till that be past, in one way or the other, I would not willingly add to it, particularly in times like the present. And pray always recollect that 'nothing could mortify me more-no failure on my ' own part-than having made you lose by any pur'chase from me.

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*

'The Monody was written by request of Mr. Kin'naird for the theatre. I did as well as I could; but 'where I have not my choice, I pretend to answer for 'nothing. Mr. Hobhouse and myself are just returned 'from a journey of lakes and mountains. We have 'been to the Grindelwald, and the Jungfrau, and stood ' on the summit of the Wengen Alp; and seen torrents ' of nine hundred feet in fall, and glaciers of all dimen'sions we have heard shepherds' pipes, and avalanches, and looked on the clouds foaming up from 'the valleys below us, like the spray of the ocean of 'hell. Chamouni, and that which it inherits, we saw ' a month ago; but, though Mont Blanc is higher, it ' is not equal in wildness to the Jungfrau, the Eighers, 'the Shreckhorn, and the Rose Glaciers.

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'We set off for Italy next week. The road is within 'this month infested with bandits, but we must take ' our chance and such precautions as are requisite. 'Ever, &c.'

'P. S. My best remembrances to Mr. Gifford. 'Pray say all that can be said from me to him.

I am sorry that Mr. Maturin did not like Phillips'

* A Monody on the death of Sheridan, which was spoken at Drurylane theatre.

picture. I thought it was reckoned a good one. If he had made the speech on the original, perhaps 'he would have been more readily forgiven by the ' proprietor and the painter of the portrait

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LETTER 246.

'Diodati, Sept. 30th, 1816. 'I answered your obliging letters yesterday: to-day 'the Monody arrived with its title-page, which is, I presume, a separate publication. "The request of 'a friend:"

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TO MR. MURRAY.

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'I will request you to expunge

that same, unless you

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please to add, "by a person of quality," or "of wit

' and honour about town." Merely say, "written to 'be spoken at Drury-lane." To-morrow I dine at 'Copet. Saturday I strike tents for Italy. This

evening, on the lake in my boat with Mr. Hobhouse, 'the pole which sustains the mainsail slipped in tack

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ing, and struck me so violently on one of my legs (the 'worst, luckily) as to make me do a foolish thing, viz. 'to faint-a downright swoon; the thing must have 'jarred some nerve or other, for the bone is not in

jured, and hardly painful (it is six hours since), and 'cost Mr. Hobhouse some apprehension and much

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sprinkling of water to recover me. The sensation 6 was a very odd one I never had but two such be

fore, once from a cut on the head from a stone, seve

'ral years ago, and once (long ago also) in falling into

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a great wreath of snow;-a sort of gray giddiness

first, then nothingness, and a total loss of memory on 'beginning to recover. The last part is not disagree'able, if one did not find it again.

'Obliged by hunger and request of friends."

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