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TEN THOUSAND A-YEAR.

Part IX.

“ FORTUNA Sævo læta negotio, et
Ludum insolentem ludere pertinax,
Transmutat incertos honores,

Nunc mihi, nunc alii benigna.
Laudo manentem : SI CELERES QUATIT
PENNAS, RESIGNO QUÆ DEDIT, ET MEA
VIRTUTE ME INVOLVO, PROBAMQUE
PAUPERIEM SINE DOTE QUÆRO."

Hor. Carm. Lib. iii. 49.

• The Attorney-General did his Lynx: here, you see, the deed is dis. work very fairly,I thought-eh, Lyox?" graced in the first instance ; no proof, said Mr Subtle, as, arm-in-arm with in fact, that it ever was a deed-thereMr Lynx, he quitted the castle-gates, fore, mere waste paper." each of them on his way to their re. “ To be sure, possession has gone spective lodgings, to prepare for their along with the deed.” next day's work.

“ Possession goes along with it?« Yes--he's a keen enough hand, to What then !--that is to say, the man be sure: he's given us all work enough; who has altered it, to benefit himself and, I must say, it's been a capital set- and his heirs, keeps it snugly in his to between you. I'm very glad you own chest and then that is of itself got the verdict !"

to be sufficient to"-" It wouldn't have done to be beaten “Yes—and again, you know, isn't on my own dunghill, as it were-eh? it the general rule that the party By the way, Lynx, that was a good hit producing an instrument must account of yours about the erasure-I ought, for the appearance of erasure or alterareally, if it had occurred to me at the tion to encounter the presumption of time, to have given you the credit of fraud ?-it seems good sense enough." it-twas entirely your's, Lynx, I " By the way, did you ever see any must say."

thing like Quicksilver in that matter? “Oh, no"-replied Lynx, modestly. I knew he'd bring Widdrington down He knew that Mr Subtle would be on him-I sate frying, I assure you! Attorney-General one day; and would To hear one's cases spoiled--butthen require the services of a certain well I it's all over now, however!- It's grim functionary-to wit, a devil really been a very interesting cause.'' " It was a mere accident my lighting “ Very. Some capital points-that on it; the merit was, the use you of Mortmain's on the stamp-act”made of it!"

“ Pish, Lynx ! there's nothing in it! “ To think of ten thousand a-year I meant the cause itself has been an turning on that same trumpery era- interesting one-uncommonly." sure.”

Mr Subtle suddenly paused, and oo But are you sure of our verdict stood still. “God bless my soul, on that ground, Mr Subtle? Do you Lynx-I've made a blunder !" think Widdrington was right in re- « Eh!” jecting that deed ?"

“ Yes_by Jove, a blunder! Never « Right ? to be sure he was! But did such a thing since I've led a cause I own I got rather uneasy at the way before." the Attorney-General put it-that the “A blunder? Impossible !- What estate had once been vested, and could is it?” enquired Lyux briskly, pricknot be subsequently de-vested by an ing up his ears. alteration or blemish in the instrument « It will be at least thirty or forty evidencing the passing of the estate, pounds out of our client's pocket. Í -eh? that was a good point, Lynx." forgot to ask Widdrington for the cer

« Aye, but as Lord Widdrington tificate for the cost of the special jury. put it-that could be only where the I protest I never did such a thing be. defect was proved to exist after a fore- I'm quite annoyed--I hate to complete and valid deed had been once overlook any thing.” established."

“ Oh! is that all?" inquired Lynx, “ True--true; that's the answer, much relieved " then it's all right!

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his Lynx: here, you see, the deed is dis-
x?" graced in the first instance ; no proof

,
rith in fact, that it ever was a deed-there-
tes, fore, mere waste paper."

To be sure, possession has gone heir along with the deed.”

“ Possession goes along with it:-
, to What then!-that is to say, the man
gh; who has altered it, to benefit himself
set. and his heirs, keeps it snugly in his
çou own chest-and then that is of itself

to be sufficient to"--
ten Yes—and again, you know, isa't
eh? it the general rule that the party
hit producing an instrument must account
-ht, for the appearance of erasure or altera-
the tion to encounter the presumption of
of fraud ?-it seems good sense enough."
I
By the
way,

ever see any
thing like Quicksilver in that matter?
ly. I knew he'd bring Widdrington down
be

on bim-Isate frying, I assure you!
uld To hear one's cases spoiled—but-
ain well ! it's all over now, however!-- It's
- really been a very interesting cause.

"
“Very. Some capital points-that
ou of Mortmain's on the stamp-act”-

Pish, Lynx ! there's nothing in it!
ar I meant the cause itself has been an
ra- interesting one-uncommonly."

Mr Subtle suddenly paused, and ct stood still. God bless my soul, ou Lynx—I've made a blunder !""

" Eh !"

While you were speaking to Mr Gam. gentlemen, walking slowly, and mon, immediately after the verdict had versing in a low tone, but with m been given, I turned towards Quick- earnestness of manner. They w silver to get him to ask for the certis in fact, Mr Aubrey and Lord Do ficate_but he had seen a man with the Zouch. Mr Subtle and Mr L new “ Times” containing the division crossed over to the other side of on the Catholic claims, and had set off narrow street, and quickened t after him-s0 I took the liberty, as pace, so as soon to be out of s you seemed very earnestly talking to and hearing of the persons they see Mr Gammon, to name it to the judge desirous of avoiding. Mr Subtle -and it's all right.”

indeed, unable to bear the sight of “ Capitall-Then there isn't a point man whom his strenuous and sple missed? And in a good two-days' tight exertions during the last two days that's something.'

tended to strip of his all—to th · D'ye think we shall keep the ver from the bright domain of wes dict, and get its fruits, Mr Subtle ?” prosperity, distinction, into-asit

We shall keep the verdict, I've -outer darkness--the outer dark no doubt; there's nothing in Wid. of poverty-of destitution. drington's notes that we need be afraid is It's a bore for Mr Aubrey, of_but of course they'll put us to it?” quoth the matter of fact Lyn bring another ejectment, perhaps seve

" It's quite frightful!"-rep ral.”

Mr Subtle, in a tone of voice “ Yes-certainly—there must be a with a manner which showed good deal of fighting before such a deeply he felt what he uttered. property as Yatton changes hands," it's not only what he will lose, replied Lynx, with a complacent air; what he will be liable to-the m for he saw a few pleasant pickings in profits—sixty thousand pounds." store for him. 65 By the way,” he « Oh !-you think, then, that continued, our client's a sweet spe can't go beyond the statute of lin cimen of humanity, isn't he!"

tion?-Eh?—is that so clear?" " Faugh! odious little reptile! And Subtle looked sharply at Lynx, did you ever in all your life witness an expression it would be difficu such a scene as when he interrupted describe. “ Well”-continued the me in the way he did ?"

penetrable Lynx—"at all events “ Ha, ha! Never! But, upon my look into it.” He felt about as a honour, what an exqusite turn you sentiment in the matter, as a pig gave the thing—it was worth more ing acorns would feel interest in than called it forth it was admir. antiquity of the oak from which able.”

fell, and under whose venerable s “ Pooh-Lynx !” said Mr. Subtle, he was munching and stufling him with a gratified air ; “ knack-mere “ By the way, Lynx--a’n't knack-nothing more. My voice with me in Higson and Mellingto trembled-eh ?—at least so I intend 56 Yes—and it stands first fo. ed."

morrow morning.” " Upon my soul, Mr Subtle, I al. 6. What's it about? I've not op most thought you were for the mo. my papers, and—why, we've a co ment overcome, and going to shed tation fixed for ten tonight.” tears."

“ It's libel against a newspapei " Ah, ha, ha !--Delightful! I was tor-the POMFRET COCKATRICE ; convulsed with inward laughter! Shed our client's a clergyman.” tears !! Did the Bar take it, Lynx ?" 66 What about?" inquired Mr Subtle ; for though he « Tithes-grasping, cruelty, ai hated display, he loved appreciation, forth." and by competent persons.

“By the - Justification ?" way, Lynx, the way in which No-not guilty only." you've got up the whole case does " Who leads for the defendant you vast credit -- that opinion of " Mr Quicksilver.” yours on the evidence was—upon my « Ohl-we can dispense wit! word—the most masterly". here he consultation then. I shall send suddenly ceased and squeezed his com- clerk to fix tomorrow mornin panion's arm, motioning him thereby court-five minutes before the si to silence. They had come up with two of the court. I'm rather tired to-ni

did you

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“ Yes--by Jove, a blunder! Never
ut did such a thing since I've led a cause
zy before."

"A blunder? Impossible !- What
ld is it?" enquired Lyux briskly, prick-
an ing up his ears.
nt

li will be at least thirty or forty
pounds out of our client's pocket

. I
forgot to ask Widdrington for the cer.
in

tificate for the cost of the special jury.
I protest I never did such a thing be-

fore-- I'm quite annoyedI hate to
ce overlook any thing.

Oh! is that all?" inquired Lynx, s, much relieved" then it's all right!

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With this the great leader shook bands Lord De la Zouch's servants, who, with with his modest, learned, laborious a great thick cane in bis hand, was junior-and entered his lodgings. standing at a little distance bebind, in

As soon as Titmouse had been eject. attendance on the carriage, which was ed from the court, in the summary standing in the castle-yard. This way which the reader will remember, man's face looked so ready for mis. merely on account of his having, with chief, that Titmouse slowly walked slight indecorum, yielded to the mighty off. There were a good many standimpulse of his agitated feelings, he ers-by, who seemed all to look with began to cry bitterly, wringing his dislike and distrust at Titmouse. He hands, and asking every one about him made many ineffectual attempts to per. if they thought he could get in again, suade the doorkeeper, who had asbecause it was his case that was going sisted in his extrusion, to re-admit bim; on. His eyes were red and swollen but the incorruptible janitor was proof with weeping; and his little breast against a sixpence-even against a throbbed violently as he walked to and shilling; and at length Titmouse gave fro from one door of the court to the himself up to despair, and thought himother. « Oh, gents, will you get me self the most miserable man in the in again?" said he, in passionate tones, whole world-as very probably, inapproaching two gentlemen, who, with deed, he was : for consider what a a very anxious and oppressed air, were horrid interval of suspense he had to standing together at the outside of one endure, from the closing of Mr Subtle's of the doors-in fact, Lord De la Zouch speech till the delivery of the verdict. and Mr Aubrey; and they quickly re- But at length, through this portentous cognised in Titmouse the gentleman and apparently impenetrable cloud, whose claims were being at that in- burst the rich sunlight of success. stant mooted within the court. " Will " Mr Titmouse I - Mr Titmouse ! you get me in ? You seem such re- - Mr Tit"spectable gents_'Pon my soul I'm “ Here! Here I am! Here!"going mad! It's my case that's going exclaimed the little fellow, jumping off on! I'm Mr Titmouse"--

the window.seat on which he had " We have no power, sir, to get you been sitting for the last hour in the in," replied Lord De la Zouch haughtdark, half stupified with grief and exily: so coldly and sternly as to cause haustion. The voice that called him Titmouse involuntarily to shrink from · was a blessed voice-a familiar voice him.

-the voice of Mr Gammon; who, as " The court is crowded to the very soon as the jury began to come back, door, sir-and we really have no more on some pretence or other had quitted right to be present in court, or get bis seat between Quirk and Snap, in others into court, than you have,” said order, if the verdict should be for the Mr Aubrey, with mildness and dignity. plaintiff, to be the very first to com

" Thank you, sir! Thank you !" municate it to him. In a moment or quoth Titmouse, moving with an ap. two Mr Gammon had grasped both prehensive air away from Lord De la Mr Titmouse's hands. “My dear, Zouch, towards Mr Aubrey, “ Know dear Mr Titmouse, I congratulate quite well who you are, sir! 'Pon my you! You are victorious! God solemn soul, sir, sorry to do all this ; grant you long life to enjoy your good but law's law, and right's right, all the fortune! God bless you, Titmouse !" world over."

He wrung Titmouse's hands—and his " I desire you to leave us, sir," said voice trembled with the intensity of Lord De la Zouch with irrepressible his emotions. Mr Titmouse had gone sternness; “ you are very intrusive. very white, and for a while spoke not, How can we catch a syllable of what but stood staring at Mr Gammon, as is going on while you are chattering in if he was hardly aware of the import this way?” Titmouse saw that Mr of his communication. Aubrey looked towards him with a “No-but-is it so ? Honour very different expression from that bright?" at length he stammered. exbibited by his forbidding companion, « It is indeed! My long labours are and would perhaps have stood his at length crowned with success! ground, but for a glimpse he caught of Hurrah, hurrah, Mr Titmouse!" a huge powdered, broad-shouldered “ I've really won ? It a'n't a joke or footman, in a splendid livery, one of a dream?" inquired Titmouse with

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hands Lord De la Zouch's servants, who, with Orious a great thick cane in bis hand, was

standing at a little distance behind, in eject. attendance on the carriage, which was mary standing in the castle-yard. This mber, man's face looked so ready for mis. - with chief, that Titmouse slowly walked nighty off. There were a good many stands, he ers-by, who seemed all to look with

bis dislike and distrust at Titmouse. He t him made many ineffectual attempts to pergain, suade the doorkeeper, who had asgoing sisted in his extrusion, to re-admit him; ollen but the incorruptible janitor was proof reast against a sixpence-even against å and shilling; and at length Titmouse gare

the himself up to despair, and thought himet me self the most miserable man in the ones, whole world-as very probably, inwith deed, he was : for consider what a were horrid interval of suspense he had to fone endure, from the closing of Mr Subtle's vuch speech till the delivery of the verdiet.

But at length, through this portentous erran and apparently impenetrable cloud, in- burst the rich sunlight of sucecss.

“ Mr Titmouse ! --Mr Titmouse!

-Mr Tit”I'm

“ Here! Here I am! Here!'oing exclaimed the little fellow, jumping off

the window.seat on which he had you been sitting for the last hour in the ht- dark, half stupitied with grief and ex

haustion. The voice that called him rom

--the voice of Mr Gammon; who, as cery soon as the jury began to come back,

y re

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quickly increasing excitement, and a not follow that the mischief is fina joyous expression bursting over his done." features, which became suddenly “I am certain of it! But, d flushed.

Lord De la Zouch, how much I “ A joke?--the best you'll ever to your kindness and sympathy !"s have. À dream that will last your Mr Aubrey, with a slight tremor life. Thank God, Mr Titmouse, the his voice. battle's ours; we've defeated all their " We are at this moment, Aubr villany!"

firmer friends than we ever were “ Tol de rol ! Tol de rol! Tol de lol, fore. So help me Heaven! I wo lol, lol, rido!— Ab,” he added, in a loud notlose your friendship for the wor truculent tone, as Lord De la Zouch I feel it a greater honour than I and Mr Aubrey slowly passed him, worthy of — I do indeed,” said L " done for you now

—'pon my life! De la Zouch, with great emotion. -turned the tables !—that for you !" “ There's a great gulf between said he, snapping his fingers ; but I though, Lord De la Zouch, as fa need hardly say that he did so with worldly circumstances are concer perfect impunity as far as those two-you a peer of the realm, I a b gentlemen were concerned, who were gar.” so absorbed with the grievous event Forgive me Aubrey, but it is which had just happened, as scarcely to talk in that way ; I am hurt bey to be aware of their being addressed measure at your supposing it poss at all.

that under any circumstances”. “ Aubrey, it's against you—all is " Believe me, I feel the full v lost; the verdict is for the plaintiff!” of your friendship,-more valuabl said Lord De la Zouch in a hurried this moment than ever." agitated whisper, as he grasped the 6. That a serious calamity has fa hand of Mr Aubrey, whom he had upon you is certain ;-which of quitted for an instant to hear the ver indeed, is safe from such a calam dict pronounced. Mr Aubrey for But who would bear it with the some moments spoke not.

fortitude which you have alre “ God's will be done!" at length evinced, my dear Aubrey ?" said he, in a low tone, and in rather a “ You speak very kindly, Loro faint murmur. More than a dozen la Zouch ; I trust I shall play the r gentlemen, who came crowding out, now that the time for playing a mgrasped his hand with great energy part has come," said Mr Aubrey, and vehemence.

an air of mingled melancholy ane “ God bless you, Aubrey ! God solution.

I feel an inexpres bless you!”-said several voices, their consolation in the reflection, th speakers wringing his hand with great cannot charge myself with any vehemence as they spoke.

unconscientious. If I have “ Let us go,"—said Lord De la wrong in depriving another for Zouch, putting Mr Aubrey's arm in long a period of what was his, it his own, and leading him away from surely in ignorance; and, as fo a scene of distressing excitement, too future, I put my trust God. powerful for bis exhausted feelings. as if I could submit to the wi

“ I am nothing of a fatalist," said Heaven with cheerfulness"'Mr Aubrey, after a pause of some mi “ Don't speak so despondi: nutes, during which they had quitted Aubrey"the castle.gates, and his feelings had Despondingly ?" echoed ME recovered from the shock which they brey, with momentary animat had just before suffered ;—" I am no " Despondingly? My dear frie thing of a fatalist, but I ought not to feel as if I were indeed entering a feel the least surprise at this issue, for black as midnight—but what is I have long had a settled conviction the valley of the shadow of death, that such would be the issue. For Lord de la Zouch, which is befo some time before I had the least inti. of us? I assure you I feel no mation of the commencement of these glorious confidence; yet I seem proceedings, I was oppressed by a leaning on the arm of an unsee sense of impending calamity"

all-powerful supporter." “ Well, that may be so; but it does " You are a hero, my dear Aub

use

was a blessed voice-a familiar voice

sore

on some pretence or other had quitted
get his seat between Quirk and Snap, ia
said order, if the verdict should be for the
ity. plaintiff, to be the very first to corn.
al" municate it to him. In a moment or
ap- two Mr Gammon had grasped both
- la Mr Titmouse's hands. " My dear,
ow dear Mr Titmouse, I congratulate
my you! You are victorious! God
is; grant you long life to enjoy your good
the fortune! God bless you, Titmouse!"

He wrung Titmouse's hands-and his
aid voice trembled with the intensity of
ble his emotions. Mr Titmouse had gone
ve. very white, and for a while spoke not,
yat but stood staring at Mr Gammon, as

in if he was hardly aware of the import
Vr of his communication.

No-but-is it so ? Honour
at bright?" at length he stammered.
,

It is indeed! My long labours are
jis at length crowned with success !-
of Hurrah, hurrah, Mr Titmouse!"
ed I've really uon? It a'n't a joke or
of a dream?" inquired Titmouse with

a

exclaimed Lord De la Zouch, with were occupied by passengers, some sudden fervour.

returning from the castle after the " And that support will embrace great trial of the day ; others standing those dearer to me than life-dearer here and there, in little knots, con-far-far" - He ceased.

versing as he passed them; and he - My God, Aubrey !--Aubrey ! felt conscious that the subject of their what's the matter?" hastily exclaimed thoughts and conversation, was himLord De la Zouch, feeling Mr Aubrey self and his fallen fortunes. Several leaning heavily against him. He deep-drawn sighs escaped him, as he grasped Mr Aubrey firmly--for his walked on, the herald of such dismal head suddenly drooped ; and, but for tidings, to those whom he loved : and his companion's support, he must have he felt but for that which supported fallen to the ground. His delicate him from within, as it were, a fallen frame was worn out with the late ex- angel so far as concerned this world's citement, and the intense anxiety and honours and greatness. The splenexhaustion he had undergone; having dours of human pomp and prosperity scarce tasted food for the last two days. seemed rapidly vanishing in the disThe sudden recurrence of his thoughts tance. In the temporary depression to the objects of his fond and ineffable of his spirits, he experienced feelings love, had completely overpowered his somewhat akin to those of the heartexhausted nature. Mark-it was only sickened exile, whose fond eyes are his physical nature that for a moment riveted upon the mosques and minagave way. It was quite unworthy of rets of his native city, bathed in the the noble soul which animated it. Of soft sunlight of evening, where are such a one it may be said--the sword the cherished objects of all his tenderis too keen for its scabbard. His sen. est thoughts and feelings; while his sibilities were exquisite; perhaps mor- vessel is rapidly bearing him from it, bidly so. A soul like his, placed in a amid the rising wind, the increasing body which, as I long ago explained, and ominous swell of the waters, the was constitutionally feeble, might, from thickening gloom of night-whither ? the intimate and inscrutable connec. The Minster clock struck ten as he tion and sympathy between mind and passed one of the corners of the vast body, for a moment appear to be of an majestic structure, grey.glistening in inferior temper: whereas the momen- the faint moonlight. The chimes tary shock and vibration occasioned echoed in his ear, and smote his subby external accident over that soul, dued soul with a sense of peculiar quickly re-exbibited its native noble solemnity and awe; they forced upon ness and strength.

him a reflection upon the transient Mr Aubrey, who sunk into Lord De littleness of earthly things. Then he la Zouch's arms in the way I have de- thought of those dear beings who were scribed, just as they were passing a awaiting his return, and a gush of small shop whose owner stood at the grief and tenderness overflowed his door, was quickly taken into it; and heart, as he quickened his steps, with within a few minutes, and with the aid an inward and fervent prayer that of a glass of water, revived in time to Heaven would support them under the take advantage of Lord De la Zouch's misfortune which had befallen them. carriage, which was passing on its way As he neared the retired row of houses from the castle to his hotel. There where his lodgings were situated, he was only Lady De la Zouch within it, imagined that he saw some one near and she welcomed Mr Aubrey with the the door of his lodgings, as if on the most affectionate sympathy ; insisting look out for his approach; and who, upon their driving him to his lodgings, as he drew nearer, at length entered in order that they might, by their pre. his lodgings. This was a person sence, comfort and apease Mrs Aubrey wliom Mr Aubrey did not at all suspect and Miss Aubrey. Mr Aubrey, how it was his worthy friend Dr Tatever, most earnestly dissuaded them, ham; who, unable to quit Yatton saying, he would rather that, on so in time to hear the trial, had early that painful an occasion, they should be morning mounted his horse, and, after alone; and after taking a glass of wine a long and hard ride, reached York and water, which greatly revived him, soon after Mr Aubrey had set off for the he quitted the hotel, alone and on foot, castle. Though many of the country and made for his lodgings. The streets people then in York were aware that

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