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The sun has a race to run through into the sweetest similes, and the heavens : will any spell or allure. example, in the setting lumin ment from earth arrest his progress? feelings that lead ourselves in None surely but the most power- clining hours to look back wi ful : but Adam well thought that such eminent fondness on the scer power resided on the lips of Raphael, passages of our early prime. when first recounting to man the wonders of creation :

“ Thus, from the precincts of the

The Sun, when sinking down to r " The greater light of day yet wants to run Though his departing radiance fai Much of his race, though steep; suspense To illuminate the hollow valein heaven,

A lingering lustre fondly throws Held by thy voice, thy potent voice, he On the dear mountain-tops, where hears,

rose." And longer will delay to hear thee tell His generation, and the rising birth

Of eagle-breed must be the Of Nature from the unapparent deep." scans with fixed intensity th

shape : nor can any but the s At deepest noon the full.blazing sun true poetry concentrate its dire seems to us to sit“ high in his meridian on his imaginative glory. Mil tower;” nor, in the hour of his de

an instant, has made the Po parture, do we forget the honour due moral Darkness, with indign: to the object of our morning admira- extorted admiration, addre tion. We still regard him as a mon. Source of Light, in language arch pursuing, in regal pomp, his of one whose fall was from hea beneficent progress through distant dominions ; or we think of him as

"O thou, that with surpassir one retiring to repose from the scene

crown'd, of his triumphs, till we almost wish

Look'st from thy sole dominion that we too conld follow in his train.

God

Of this new world ; at whose sigh “66 Oh happy,' cried the priests, Your brethren who have fallen ! already Hide their diminish'd heads; to they

stars

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Imighty who rejoices in all her beauty at the

splendour of his coming. Glorious is eve, the vision of their nuptials: number. nament less and lovely the offspring that orering shall adorn their bed! The life that

we confer upon the orb of day, and Light, which we intertwine with the light god!”

that is his essence, diffuses itself upoe a mo. all the objects of lower creation which ts, will his presence illumes. er and « What soul was his, when, from the na

ked top

himself Of some bold headland, he beheld the su

Rise up and bathe the world in light! He sun

looked st,

Ocean and earth, the solid frame of earth auds are

And ocean's liquid mass, beneath him las

In gladness and deep joy. The cloade rack

were touch'd nt."

And in their silent faces did be read

Voutterable love." a ta. sun,

Thus, too, the poet of the Seasons oming addresses the bright ruler of those deed à fair vicissitudes which diversify bis

earth, immortal song:-ation from thy touch life. By thee refined,

the relucent stream ad. The precipice abrupt,

on the blacken'd lood, urn. The desert joys 11 his melancholy bounds.

and the briny deep, inted promontory's top, orizon's utmost verge,

floating gleam." of this diffusive happiness, not limited to the

call, Have join'd the company of blessed souls ; But with no friendly voice: and Already they with song and harmony,

name, And in the dance of beauty, are gone O Sun, to tell thee how I hate th forth,

That bring to my remembrance fr To follow down his western path of light

state Yon sun, the Prince of Glory, from the I fell,-how glorious once al world

sphere!" Retiring to the palace of his rest.'"

But the apostrophe is not la Is not the last ray that he throws on

tained. The perturbed soul earth like the interchange of parting outcast angel soon wanders fro looks with a dear friend, whose smile objects to his own bitter recol even in separation is joyful, because and guilty prospects; and, his return is certain ?

through all the emotions that As when from mountain tops the dusky to remorse and revenge, subsi clouds

the fearful invocation that fore Ascending, while the north wind sleeps, fate Evil, be thou my good o'er-spread

The bard of Morven has Heaven's cheerful face; the lowering ele. formal address to that luminary

light was withdrawn from his Scowls o'er the darken’d landscape snow vision. It is familiar to all o or shower:

ers, and need not be quoted Jf chance the radiant sun, with farewell undoubtedly a noble effusion of sweet,

and if it have a few specks Extend his evening beam, the fields re

splendour, the Sun himself is vive

from them, and we on eart The birds their note renew; and bleating humbly repeat the much-forgot

berds
Attest their joy, that hill and valley rings."

tence: “ Ubi plura nitent in

non ego paucis offendar maculi May we not moralize such moments A modern poet, in choosi:

ment

at day, a speck to stain ne blessed Sun, alone, vinity,

his fields of light. -th the bright blue sky, be glowing green expanse, bending line of shore

when the peacock's neck
tint of amethyst,
glory. All the flocks
: like floating foam,
fall upon the waves;
neck, the cormorants
loft ; and round and round
d give their note of joy.
into the heart
en the insect swarms
5 and coverts issued forth,
day of existence more ;
on the bank,
h it had no cause to mourn
ch; the rocks, and shores,

erlasting hills
unshine-they partook

theme an Oriental story of the Fire. . Love's ANNIVERSARY. worshippers, had a noble occasion for

To the Sun. presenting in an impressive aspect « Thou art return'd (great light) to that that object which, in the hearts of his blest hour, heroes, combined the mysteriousness of In which I first by marriage' sacred power religious awe with the radiance of Join'd with Castara hearts: and as the same natural beauty. We doubt, however,

Thy lustre is as then, so is our flame; if he has successfully done so in the

Which had increased but that, by love's

decree, passage where the attempt seems to

'Twas such at first, it ne'er could greater be. have been made :

But tell me, glorious lamp, in thy survey “ And see-the Sun himself !-on wings

Of things below thée, what did not decay Of glory up the East he springs.

By age to weakness? I since that have seen Angel of light! who from the time

The rosebud forth and fade, the tree grow Those heavens began their march sublime,

green Hath_first of all the starry choir

And wither--and the beauty of the field Trod in his Maker's steps of fire!

With winter wrinkled. Even thyself dost Where are the days, thou wondrous

yield sphere,

Something to time, and to thy grave fall When Iran, like a sup-flower, turn'd

nigher ; To meet that eye where'er it burn'? But virtuous love is one sweet endless fire.

When from the banks of Bendemeer As our previous observations touch. To the nut-groves of Samarcand,

ed on the superstitions connected with Thy temples flamed o'er all the land !”

eclipses of the sun and moon, it may

be interesting to insert two descrip. We do not much like the repre- tions of a solar eclipse, which will sentation of the Sun“ with wings."

help to illustrate the transition from It suggests to our ornithological

the mythological to the poetical faculties an image of rather a clumsy

personification. The one by Wordscontour; and if the luminary was to

worth, represents the eclipse of 1820, be painted flying, we should have prefer.

as seen through the softness of Italian red the wings to be kept out of sight. skies. But, letting that pass-what shall we say to the concluding appellation, on

“ High on her speculative tower which we stumble as over a stone,

Stood Science, waiting for the hour when we are expecting the climax of

When Sol was destined to endure the address ? « Where are the days,

That darkening of his radiant face

Which Superstition strove to chase, thou wondrous sphere ?" Alas! the

Erewhile with rites impure. mighty Mithras—the winged Sun-the Angel of Light-is become a sphere!

“No vapour stretch'd his wings; no cloud This, indeed, realizes the lament of

sament of Cast far or near a murky shroud ;

caste Schiller, and makes it quite unneces. The sky an azure field display'd ; sary to answer the poet's question ; 'Twas sunlight sheath'd and gently charm'd, where are the days when the sphere of all its sparkling rays disarm’d, was supposed to be something very And as in slumber laid :different? But, possibly, Mr Moore may have been here too intent on his " Or something, night or day between, parallel between Iran and Erin, and Like moonshine, but the hue was green; too anxious to show that his friends in Still moonshine, without shadow, spread both countries could distinguish be- On jutted rock, and curved shore, tween spiritual adoration and its phy. Where gazed the peasant from his door, sical types.

And on the mountain's head. Let us conclude this topic by insert. ing some lines to the solar power, of a “Lo! while I speak, the labouring sun much humbler, but, in our opinion, a His glad deliverance has begun : more successful kind, flowing from the

The cypress waves its sombre plume heart of one who wrote with less of

More cheerily; and town and tower, fiction than poets usually employ. It

The vineyard and the olive bower, is an address, by the virtuous Habing

Their lustre reassume!” ton, in commemoration of the endu. The other example, of which the rance of that united love which some scene is laid in the Arctic regions, is times scarcely survives the first rapid from Montgomery's Grcenland, and revolution of the sister-luminary: allowing for some imperfections of

noon

expression, might well deserve the In other moods the poet or the praise of sublimity.

sees in her pale loveliness, not the “ Their faith must yet be tried : the sun at nity of a sovereign, but the sorro

one who is herself subject to a dc Shrinks from the shadow of the passing ion that sheds a happy or a disas

influence on the whole of sentier moon,

ture: Till, ray by ray, of all his pomp bereft, (Save one slight ring of quivering lustre “ With how sad steps, O moon! left;)

climb'st the skies! Total eclipse involves his peerless eye: How silently, and with how wan a fa Portentous twilight creeps along the sky; What! may it be that even in hes The frighted sea-birds, to their haunts place repair;

That busy archer his sharp arrows to There is a freezing stillness in the air, Sure if that long-with-love-acquainte As if the blood through nature's veins ran Can judge of love, thou feel'st a 1 cold,

case ; A prodigy so fearful to behold;

I read it in thy looks; thy lang A few faint stars gleam through the dread

grace, serene,

To me, that feel the like, thy sta Trembling and pale spectators of the scries.” scene;

How many aspects of varying b While the rude mariners with stern amaze,

does the enlightener of the nig As on some tragic execution gaze,

sume to our mental vision? W When calm but awful guilt is stretch'd to

livelier fancy is on the wing, th feel

tions of other days reappear, an The torturing fire, or dislocating wheel, And life, like light from yonder orb, retires, goddess traverses the sky with a Spark after spark, till the whole man

appliances of Pagan splendour expires.

disdaining for a while to suspen Yet may the darken'd sun and mourning course as she sees or hears thing skies,

lightful to her heart. Thus it is Point to a higher, holier sacrifice; the pensive spirit of the poet imy The brethren's thoughts to Calvary's brow

thatascend,

“ Philomel will deign a song Round the Redeemer's Cross their spirits In her sweetest saddest plight, bend,

Smoothing the rugged brow of nigh And while heaven frowns, earth shudders, While Cynthia checks her dragon yo graves disclose

Gently o'er the accustomed oak.' The forms of sleepers, startled from repose,

Does not the lovely light seem They catch the blessing of his latest breath, Mark his last look, and through th' eclipse

times to rejoice when the blue co of death,

is all her own, and not a cloud re See lovelier beams than Tabor's vision

to checker its purity!shed,

« The moon doth with delight Wreathe a meek halo round his sacred Look round her when the heavens are head."

But now again does it not se The honours that imagination has if she were all uncertain in the paid to the sun have scarcely exceeded she was pursuing, and in need those which the milder beauty of his guide to lead her along the se sister has received. To the poet's eye

sameness of the untrodden sky? she too appears to ascend the heavens

"I walk unseen in regal majesty, where she holds On the dry smooth-shaved green, sway over the "common people of the To behold the wandering Moon skies," who acknowledge her prece- Riding near her highest noon, dence, and give place to her glory as

Like one that had been led astray she moves among them.

Through the Heaven's wide pathless

And oft, as if her head she bowed, “ Now glow'd the firmament With living sapphires : Hesperus, that led

Stooping through a fleecy cloud.” The starry host, rode brightest, till the May we not readily, too, assi

the course that she thus purel Rising in clouded majesty, at length patiently pursues amidst the Apparent queen unveil'd her peerless light, vapours that surround her, to the And o'er the dark her silver mantle throw." majesty in which innocent and et

NO. CCXCVII. VOL. XLVIII.

moon

green

On Personification.

July, the Fire

LOVE'S ANNIVERSARY. ccasion for

To the Sun. e aspect

“ Thou art return'd (great light) to that rts of his

blest hour, ousness of In which I first by marriage' sacred power diance of Join'd with Castara bearts: and as the same

however, Thy lustre is as then, so is our flame; so in the Which bad increased but that, by love's seems to

decree, 'Twas such at first, it ne'er could greater be.

But tell me, glorious lamp, in thy survey on wings

Of things below thee, what did not decar

By age to weakness? I since that have seen Eme

The rosebud forth and fade, the tree gror ch sublime, ir

And wither-and the beauty of the field e!

With winter wrinkled. Even thyself dost wondrous

yield

Something to time, and to thy grare crn'd

nigher ; irn'u ?

But virtuous love demeer

As our previous observations touch. 1,

ed on the superstitions connected with land!"

eclipses of the sun and moon, it may

be interesting to insert two descrip. che repre- tions of a solar eclipse, which will wings.”

help to illustrate the transition from hological the mythological to the poetical a clumsy personification. The one by Words ty was to worth, represents the celipse of 1820, veprefer- as seen through the softness of Italian of sight. skies.

shall we lation, on

High on her speculative tower a stone,

Stood Science, waiting for the hour

When Sol was destined to endure climax of the days,

That darkening of his radiant face

Which Superstition strove to chase, ilas! the

Erewhile with rites impure. Sun-the a sphere! “No vapour stretch'd his wings; no cload

one sweet endless fire.

ament of

Cast far or near a murky shroud ; unneces.

The sky an azure field display'd; question; 'Twas sunlight sheath'd and gently charm'd, ne sphere Of all its sparkling rays disarm’d, ang very

And as in slumber laid :r Moore nt on his

“ Or something, night or day between, Erin, and Like moonshine, but the hue was green; Friends in

Still moonshine, without shadow, spread uish be On jutted rock, and curved shore, its phy. Where gazed the peasant from his door,

And on the mountain's head. ny insert. wer, of a Lo! while I speak, the labouring sun pinion, a

His glad deliverance has begun : from the The cypress waves its sombre plume z less of More cheerily; and town and tower,

The vineyard and the olive bower, Hlabing

Their lustre reassume!e endu The other example, of which the h some

scene is laid in the Arctic regions, is st rapid from Montgomery's Greenland, and

allowing for some imperfections of

loy. It

D

souls advance on their earthly path, And yet this benediction passeth not, through the exhalations of sin and One obscure hiding-place, one little spot. sorrow, on which they have even Where pleasure may be sent: the nested power to bestow a portion of their own wren passing lustre? Take as an illustra. Has thy fair face within its tranquil ken, tion this beautiful address to a child of And from beneath a sheltering ivy-leaf a month old :

Takes glimpses of thee: thou art a relief

To the poor patient oyster, where it sleeps « Thy sinless progress, through a world Within its pearly home. The mighty deeps, By sorrow darken'd and by care disturbod, The monstrous sea is thine—the myriad sea! Apt likeness bears to hers, through gathering 0, Moon! farspooming Ocean bows to clouds,

thee ! Moving untouch'd in silver purity, And cheering oftimes their reluctant gloom.

We do not know if this be genius; Fair are ye both, and both are free from in some points it looks very like it, stain :

but if it be genuine it seems to be diBut thou, how leisurely thou fill'st thy horn vided by even a thinner partition than With brightness ! leaving her to post along usual from one of its next door neighAnd range about - disquieted in change, bours, and a very Pyramus and And still impatient of the shape she wears. Thisbe-like intercourse seems to be Once up, once down the hill, one journey, kept up between them. The passage babe,

is from Keats' Endymion, a poem in That will suffice thee."

which one of the loveliest of classical It were endless to advert to the in- fables is defaced by an absurd incofinite forms in which incense from the herency of detail, and overlaid by an shrine of poetry has ascended to the extravagant profusion of embellishlunar throne. In many of such ment. One line had told the story offerings, unfortunately, the divinity infinitely better :addressed seems to have exercised

“Peace ho ! the moon sleeps with Eutoo characteristic an influence over her votaries, whose effusions seem

dymion.” to be prompted by the “fine The mysterious connexion between frenzy," not of the lover or the poet, the moon and the ocean, which supbut of the other unhappy enthusiast plies a topic in these lines from whom Shakspeare has associated with Keats, is well adapted for the exercise these, as “ of imagination all com- of poetical fancy. The moon, as “ the pact." To which of these sources governess of floods,” could not be dismust we assign the following lines ?- regarded by the poet, when she seems

"- By the feud to look upon the sea beneath her as if 'Twixt nothing and Creation, I here swear,

darting down those rays of sympa. Eterne Apollo ! that thy sister fair

thy which so beautifully bind togeIs of all these the gentlier-mightiest.

ther the subject and the sovereign. When thy gold breath is misty in the west, The lines that follow, give a worthy She, unobserved, steals unto her throne,

expression to that relation, though they

expression to ma And there she sits most meek and most do not certainly contain such “ faralone,

spooming” epithets, as those of the As if she had not pomp subservient ; poet whom we have just quoted. As if thine eye, high poet! was not bent Towards her with the Muses in thine heart;

The mighty Moon she sits above, As if the ministering stars kept not apart,

Encircled with a zone of love; Waiting for silver-footed messages.

A zone of dim and tender light, 0, Moon! the oldest sbades 'mong oldest

That makes her wakeful eye more bright.

She seems to shine with a sunny ray, trees Feel palpitations when thou lookest on:

And the night looks like a mellow'd day! 0, Moon! old boughs lisp forth a holier din

The gracious mistress of the main, The while they feel thine airy fellowship

Hath now an undisturbed reign; Thou dost bless every where, with silver lip

And from her silent throne looks down, Kissing dead things to life.

As upon children of her own,

The sleeping on the waves that lend their gentle breast, kine, Couch'd in thy brightness, dream of fields

In gladness for her couch of rest. divine :

In whose eyes besides those of the Innumerable mountains rise and rise, lover whose visions we have noticed, Ambitious for the hallowing of thine eyes; is the Moon likely to wear the fairest

even

wren

path, And yet this benediction passeth net and One obscure hiding-place, one little spot

Where pleasure may be sent: the rested ir own Lustra

Has thy fair face within its tranquil ken, wild of And from beneath a sheltering ivy-leaf

Takes glimpses of thee: thou art a relief

To the poor patient oyster, where it sleeps world

Within its pearly home. The mighty depa bid,

The monstrous sea is thine-the myriad sa thering 0, Moon! far-spooming Ocean bows tą

thee! gloom.

We do not know if this be genius ; e from in some points it looks very like it

but if it be genuine it seems to be di. y horn vided by even a thinner partition than along usual from one of its next door neigbo

bours, and a very Pyramus and

Thisbe-like intercourse seems to be urney, kept up between them. The passage

is from Keats' Endymion, a poem in

which one of the loveliest of classical he in. fables is defaced by an absurd incom the herency of detail, and overlaid by an o the extravagant profusion of embellish

such ment. One line had told the story winity infinitely better :-cised

Peace ho! the moon sleeps with Es

dymion."

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ge, Sears.

attractions ? Good old Gawin Douglas When death and danger, terro thus fitly addresses her:

dismay, “ Hornyt lady, pail Cynthia, not brycht,

Are madly struggling on the dismal

With heedless smile and calm un Quilk from thi broder borrowis all the lycht,

motion, Rewlare of passage and ways mony one, Onward thou glidest through the Maistres of stremys and glaidar of the dycht, Schipmen and pilgrymys hallowis thi mycht.' Nor, in thy own immortal beauty b

way, Milton, too, makes the brothers in Hear’st dying mortals rave themsel Comus invoke her as a power to whom rest. the wayfarer looks not in vain for Yet when this night thou mount kind protection :

starry throne, “ Unmufile, ye faint stars ; and thou, fair Brightening to sunlike glory in thy Moon,

Wilt thou not then thy once-loved That wont'st to love the traveller's benison, And wish her happy now that she is

miss, Stoop thy pale visage through an amber cloud,

To whom else than these ca And disinherit chaos, that reigns here In double night of darkness and of shades."

glimpses of the moon be so inte

dear as to prompt the sponta But faint, perhaps, or feeble in con. poetry of the Heart? Surely, templative earnestness must be the love than to any others, to those w of other travellers compared with that in the darkness and desolation of which rivets the lonely seaman's gaze, in age, counting the tedious re the watches of the night, on that object places of time, and reviving as it which brightens his watery scene, and the dead at any kind visitation on which, belonging as it does to earth seems to break their loneliness, aswell as to'ocean, he would fain believe betoken the return of light and li that the weeping eyes of friends at home

“ Smile of the moon !—for so I nan are now fixed in sympathy with his. And if this gentle visitant of the night That silent greeting from above; is thus dear to the sea-farer's heart,

A gentle flash of light that came can we readily believe that she does From Her whom drooping captive not, in return, look in love on the gal. Thou that didst part the clouds of e

Or art thou of still higher birth? lant vessels that wing their way beneath her beams, and commiserate the My torpor to reprove !" sad disasters which they are doomed to undergo.

Such are some of the imagi

impersonations of these fair orbs “O heavenly Queen! by mariners beloved! spring from the feelings of the Resulgeat moon! when in the cruel sea Down sank yon fair ship to her coral grave; additional beauty to their lustr

and which, in all time, will gi Where didst thou linger then? Sure it behoved

a stronger energy to their moral A spirit strong and pitiful like thee ence, yet so as not to distur At that dread hour thy worshippers to save ;

rather to aid and enforce the s Nor let the glory where thy tenderest light, truth, that these are but the di Forsaking even the clouds, with pleasure lay, flections of ineffable brightnes Pass, like a cloud which none deplores, transcendant power, in a Beir away,

finitely greater than all his No more to bless the empire of the night.

. from whom our faculties have bo

ed all their resources, and to who O vain belief! most beauteous as thou can communicate nothing unless art,

the imperfections of our own uns Thy heavenly visage hides a cruel heart. and inadequate apprehensions.

!

over

seem

=* fine

poet, isiast with comurces 28?e feud wear,

west,

The mysterious connexion between
the moon and the ocean, which sup-
plies a topic in these lines from
Keats, is well adapted for the exercise
of poetical fancy. The moon, as “ the
governess of floods," could not be dis-
regarded by the poet, when she seems
to look upon the sea beneath her as if
darting down those rays of sympa-
thy which so beautifully bind toge-
ther the subject and the sovereigt,
The lines that follow, give a worthy

expression to that relation, though they
most do not certainly contain such so far.
spoomingepithets

, as those of the poet whom we have just quoted.

The mighty Moon she sits above, eart; Encircled with a zone of love;

A zone of dim and tender light,

That makes her wakeful eye more brigit.
Idest

She seems to shine with a sunny say,
And the night looks like a mellow'd day!

The gracious mistress of the main,
r din

Hath now an undisturbed reign ;
p.

And from her silent tbrone looks down,
r.lip As upon children of her own,
ping On the waves that lend their gentle breast,

In gladness for her couch of rest.

In whose eyes besides those of the lover whose visions we have noticed, is the Moon likely to wear the fairest

*

*

nt

art,

:

Eelds

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