Native Place, City, and Nation: Regional Networks and Identities in Shanghai, 1853–1937

封面
University of California Press, 1995年10月20日 - 367 頁
0 書評
This book explores the role of native place associations in the development of modern Chinese urban society and the role of native-place identity in the development of urban nationalism. From the late nineteenth to the early twentieth century, sojourners from other provinces dominated the population of Shanghai and other expanding commercial Chinese cities. These immigrants formed native place associations beginning in the imperial period and persisting into the mid-twentieth century. Goodman examines the modernization of these associations and argues that under weak urban government, native place sentiment and organization flourished and had a profound effect on city life, social order and urban and national identity.
 

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內容

Introduction
1
r
21
f f
31
Foreign Imperialism
47
pnri
51
Community Hierarchy
84
jfSSMafs
108
Expansive Practices
119
Figure 6 French destruction of
167
The Native Place
176
Modern Spirit5 Institutional
217
The Native Place and the State
258
Conclusion
305
Appendix
315
Glossary
317
Bibliography
325

NativePlace Associations
147

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關於作者 (1995)

Bryna Goodman is Associate Professor of Modern Chinese History at the University of Oregon.

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