The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Measure for measure. Midsummer-night's dream. Much ado about nothing. Love's labour's lost

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C. Whittingham, 1826
 

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第6页 - Heaven doth with us, as we with torches do ; Not light them for themselves : for if our virtues Did not go forth of us, 'twere all alike As if we had them not.
第413页 - When icicles hang by the wall, And Dick the shepherd blows his nail, And Tom bears logs into the hall. And milk comes frozen home in pail...
第246页 - Philomel, with melody Sing in our sweet lullaby; Lulla, lulla, lullaby ; lulla, lulla, lullaby ; Never harm, nor spell nor charm, Come our lovely lady nigh; So, good night, with lullaby.
第235页 - Swifter than the moon's sphere; And I serve the Fairy Queen, To dew her orbs upon the green. The cowslips tall her pensioners be; In their gold coats spots you see; Those be rubies, fairy favours, In those freckles live their savours. I must go seek some dewdrops here, And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.
第305页 - Biron they call him ; but a merrier man, Within the limit of becoming mirth, I never spent an hour's talk withal : His eye begets occasion for his wit ; For every object that the one doth catch The other turns to a mirth-moving jest, Which his fair tongue, conceit's expositor, Delivers in such apt and gracious words That aged ears play truant at his tales And younger hearings are quite ravished ; So sweet and voluble is his discourse.
第54页 - Ay, but to die, and go we know not where ; To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot ; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod ; and the delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside In thrilling...
第412页 - When shepherds pipe on oaten straws And merry larks are ploughmen's clocks, When turtles tread, and rooks, and daws, And maidens bleach their summer smocks, The cuckoo then, on every tree, Mocks married men ; for thus sings he, Cuckoo ; Cuckoo, cuckoo...
第151页 - Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more, Men were deceivers ever ; One foot in sea, and one on shore; To one thing constant never: Then sigh not so, But let them go, And be you blithe and bonny ; Converting all your sounds of woe Into, Hey nonny, nonny. II. Sing no more ditties, sing no mo...
第168页 - Why, then take no note of him, but let him go ; and presently call the rest of the watch together, and thank God you are rid of a knave.
第50页 - Do curse the gout, serpigo, and the rheum, For ending thee no sooner. Thou hast nor youth nor age; But, as it were, an after-dinner's sleep, Dreaming on both ; for all thy blessed youth Becomes as aged, and doth beg the alms Of palsied eld ; and when thou art old and rich, Thou hast neither heat, affection, limb, nor beauty, To make thy riches pleasant. What's yet in this That bears the name of life ? Yet in this life Lie hid more thousand deaths ; yet death we fear, That makes these odds all even.

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