Essay-writing for Schools: A Practical Exposition of the Principles of this Form of Composition, Illustrated by Models and by Examples Drawn from the English Classics; and Designed to Meet the Requirements of the Public Examinations

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John Murray, 1903 - 309页
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第300页 - And yet it never was in my soul To play so ill a part : But evil is wrought by want of Thought, As well as want of Heart...
第221页 - Then I saw in my dream, that when they were got out of the wilderness, they presently saw a town before them, and the name of that town is Vanity ; and at the town there is a fair kept, called Vanity Fair : it is kept all the year long ; it beareth the name of Vanity Fair, because the town where it is kept is lighter than vanity ; and also because all that is there sold, or that cometh thither, is vanity. As is the saying of the wise,
第132页 - God Almighty first planted a garden; and, indeed, it is the purest of human pleasures; it is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross handyworks...
第109页 - It is a pleasure to stand upon the shore, and to see ships tossed upon the sea ; a pleasure to stand in the window of a castle, and to see a battle and the adventures thereof below : but no pleasure is comparable to the standing upon the vantage ground of Truth, (a hill not to be commanded, and where the air is always clear and serene,) and to see the errors, and wanderings, and mists, and tempests, in the vale below ' ; so always that this prospect be with pity, and not with swelling or pride.
第94页 - ... certain it is that, whosoever hath his mind fraught with many thoughts, his wits and understanding do clarify and break up in the communicating and discoursing with another: he tosseth his thoughts more easily ; he marshalleth them more orderly; he seeth how they look when they are turned into words: finally, he waxeth wiser than himself; and that more by an hour's discourse than by a day's meditation.
第108页 - ... a natural though corrupt love of the lie itself. One of the later school of the Grecians examineth the matter, and is at a stand to think what should be in it that men should love lies : where neither they make for pleasure, as with poets; nor for advantage, as with the merchant; but for the lie's sake. But I cannot tell : this same truth is a naked and open daylight, that doth not show the masks, and mummeries, and triumphs of the world half so stately and daintily as candlelights.
第299页 - To be prepared for war is one of the most effectual means of preserving peace.
第108页 - What is truth? said jesting Pilate, and would not stay for an answer. Certainly there be that delight in giddiness, and count it a bondage to fix a belief; affecting free-will in thinking, as well as in acting: and, though the sects of philosophers of that kind be gone, yet there remain certain discoursing wits which are of the same veins, though there be not so much blood in them as was in those of the ancients.
第220页 - Vanity of vanities, saith the Preacher, vanity of vanities ; all is vanity. What profit hath a man of all his labour which he taketh under the sun 1 One generation passeth away, and another generation cometh : but the earth abideth for ever.
第97页 - It is a strange thing to behold what gross errors and extreme absurdities many (especially of the greater sort) do commit for want of a friend to tell them of them, to the great damage both of their fame and fortune: for, as St.

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