Emerson: A Statement of New England Transcendentalism as Expressed in the Philosophy of Its Chief Exponent

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The University, 1917 - 110 頁
 

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第 53 頁 - Is lightened : — that serene and blessed mood, In which the affections gently lead us on, — Until, the breath of this co1poreal frame And even the motion of our human blood Almost suspended, we are laid asleep In body, and become a living soul : While with an eye made quiet by the power Of harmony, and the deep power of joy, We see into the life of things.
第 52 頁 - We live in succession, in division, in parts, in particles. Meantime within man is the soul of the whole; the wise silence; the universal beauty, to which every part and particle is equally related; the eternal ONE.
第 96 頁 - The hand that rounded Peter's dome, And groined the aisles of Christian Rome, Wrought in a sad sincerity: Himself from God he could not free; He builded better than he knew : The conscious stone to beauty grew.
第 62 頁 - When we have broken our god of tradition, and ceased from our god of rhetoric, then may God fire the heart with his presence.
第 36 頁 - Sensible objects conform to the premonitions of Reason and reflect the conscience. All things are moral ; and in their boundless changes have an unceasing reference to spiritual nature. Therefore is nature glorious with form, color, and motion ; that every globe in the remotest heaven, every chemical change from the rudest crystal up to the laws of life, every change of vegetation from the first principle of growth in the eye of a leaf, to the tropical forest and antediluvian coal-mine...
第 55 頁 - The inquiry leads us to that source, at once the essence of genius, of virtue, and of life, which we call Spontaneity or Instinct. We denote this primary wisdom as Intuition, whilst all later teachings are tuitions. In that deep force, the last fact behind which analysis cannot go, all things find their common origin.
第 25 頁 - All writing comes by the grace of God, and all doing and having. I would gladly be moral and keep due metes and bounds, which I dearly love, and allow the most to the will of man ; but I have set my heart on honesty in this chapter, and I can see nothing at last, in success or failure, than more or less of vital force supplied from the Eternal.
第 52 頁 - All goes to show that the soul in man is not an organ, but animates and exercises all the organs ; is not a function, like the power of memory, of calculation, of comparison, but uses these as hands and feet ; is not a faculty, but a light ; is not the intellect or the will, but the master of the intellect and the will ; is the background of our being, in which they lie, — an immensity not possessed and that cannot be possessed.
第 96 頁 - To believe your own thought, to believe that what is true for you in your private heart is true for all men, — that is genius.
第 5 頁 - Everybody had a mission (with a capital M) to attend to everybody else's business. No brain but had its private maggot, which must have found pitiably short commons sometimes. Not a few impecunious zealots abjured the use of money (unless earned by other people), professing to live on the internal revenues of the spirit. Some had an assurance of instant millennium so soon as hooks and eyes should be substituted for buttons. Communities were established where everything was...

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