Manners and Customs of the Japanese, in the Nineteenth Century

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J. Murray, 1841 - 423 頁
 

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用戶評語  - stefrand - LibraryThing

I have yet to read this book...I got it some time ago as an addition to my Japanese culture selection. 閱讀評論全文

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第 133 頁 - Then he ordered us to take off our cappa, or cloak, being our garment of ceremony ; then to stand upright, that he might have a full view of us ; again, to walk, to stand still, to compliment each other, to dance, to jump, to play the drunkard, to speak broken Japanese, to read Dutch, to paint, to sing, to put our cloaks on and off.
第 125 頁 - Nagasaki and the chief interpreter are the only persons who accompany the opperhoefd, and give him the signal of retreat, which, like his entrance, is performed in a very stooping attitude ; so that, although the presence of numbers may be perceived, it is impossible, without violating the laws of Japanese courtesy, to look round for what should attract attention or excite curiosity.
第 134 頁 - ... of us ; again, to walk, to stand still, to compliment each other, to dance, to jump, to play the drunkard, to speak broken Japanese, to read Dutch, to paint, to sing, to put our cloaks on and off. Meanwhile we...
第 130 頁 - Emperor sat on the other; and there, kneeling, he bowed his forehead quite down to the ground, and so crawled backwards like a crab, without uttering a single word. So mean and short a thing is the audience we have of this mighty monarch.
第 317 頁 - ... round rocks placed here and there, then running across the middle of the landscape till lost in a wood of fir-trees. A golden sun hangs aloft in the sky, and, turning upon a pivot, indicates the striking of the hours. On the frame below the twelve hours of day and night are marked, where a slowly-creeping tortoise serves as a hand.
第 344 頁 - As he spoke, he tore out his eyes and presented them to Yoritomo on a salver. The prince, struck with admiration, released him; and Kakekigo withdrew into retirement, where he founded the second order of the blind, the Fekisado.
第 305 頁 - Upright in heart be thou and pure, So shall the blessing of God Through eternity be upon thee ; ' Clamorous prayers shall not avail, But truly a clear conscience, That worships and fears in silence.
第 193 頁 - If a man holding office dies, his death is concealed — it is naibon — and family life proceeds apparently as usual till the reversion of his place has been obtained for his son. If such a person be deeply in debt, the same course is adopted for the benefit of his creditors, who receive his salary, whilst he, though well known to be dead, is nominally alive. Again, if he has incurred any...
第 130 頁 - which was the signal for him to draw near and make his obeisance. Accordingly he crawled on his hands and knees to a place showed him between the presents, ranged in due order on one side, and the place where the emperor sat on the other, and then kneeling, he bowed his forehead quite down to the ground, and so crawled backwards like a crab, without uttering one single word.
第 243 頁 - To effect this, it was indispensable to surprise him, and measures were taken accordingly. An alarm of fire was raised at Tchouya's door, and when he ran out to ascertain the degree of danger threatening his house, he was suddenly surrounded and attacked. He defended himself stoutly, cutting down two of his assailants, but, in the end, was overpowered by numbers and secured. His wife, meanwhile, had heard the sounds of conflict, and apprehending its cause, immediately caught up those of her husband's...

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