The Alphabet of Nature; Or, Contributions Towards a More Accurate Analysis and Symbolization of Spoken Sounds; with Some Account of the Principal Phonetical Alphabets Hitherto Proposed

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Bagster, 1845 - 194页

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第10页 - Jessica. Look how the floor of heaven Is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold. There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st But in his motion like an angel sings, Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubims : Such harmony is in immortal souls ; But whilst this muddy vesture of decay Doth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it.
第29页 - These considerations soon induced me, upon entering on this investigation, to lay down a different plan of operations; namely, neglecting entirely the organs of speech, to determine, if possible, by experiments upon the usual acoustic instruments, what forms of cavities or other conditions, are essential to the production of these sounds, after which, by comparing these with the various positions of the human organs, it might be possible, not only to deduce the explanation and reason of their various...
第149页 - With the isolated villages of the desert it is far otherwise. They have no such meetings; they are compelled to traverse the wilds, often to a great distance from their native village. On such occasions, fathers and mothers, and all who can bear a burden, often set out for weeks at a time, and leave their children to the care of two or three infirm old people. The infant progeny, some of whom are beginning to lisp, while others can just master a whole sentence, and those still further advanced, romping...
第155页 - That sounds within a determined degree of likeness, be represented by signs within a determined degree of likeness ; whilst sounds beyond a certain degree of likeness, be represented by distinct and different signs, and that uniformly.
第34页 - For want of a different notation, I have given in the second column the English word containing the vowel in question :— " I have found this table as correct a general standard as I could well expect; for vowels, it must be considered, are not definite sounds, like the different harmonics of a note, but on the contrary glide into each other by almost imperceptible gradations, so that it becomes extremely difficult...
第39页 - ... they do not exist, but because they are overpowered by the original sound of the reed. We do not mean to assert that each multiple resonance is a distinct vowel sound : but we infer that, when a tube is added to a reed or vibrating tongue, whatever may be its length, a quality is added to the original sound, which depends on the feeble vibrations of the air in the added tube ; these increase in number in proportion to the shortness of the tube ; and when the number of vibrations thus excited...
第32页 - ... pleasure the tube through which the air passed on quitting the reed. The results, which partly depended upon the musical note of the reed, are described by Mr. Willis in these words : — "No. 1. IEAOU* UOAEIIEAOU Let the line abed represent the length of the pipe measured from a, and take ab, be, cd, &c., respectively equal to the length of the stopped pipe in unison with the reed employed, that is, equal to half the length of the sonorous wave of the reed. " Now if the pipe be drawn out gradually,...
第36页 - The entire series of vowels can be produced from tubes of either of his forms by merely changing its dimensions. Mr. Willis finally concludes, from his experiments, that the vowel quality, added to any sound, is merely the coexistence of its peculiar note with that sound ; this accompanying note being excited by the successive reflections of the original wave of the reed at the extremities of the added tube. This view of the matter naturally associates the phenomena of vowel-sounds with those of...
第156页 - C'était d'éclairer sa lanterne. FABLE VIII. L'ENFANT ET LE MIRAIR. Un enfant élevé dans un pauvre village Revint chez ses parens , et fut surpris d'y voir Un miroir. D'abord il aima son image , Et puis par un travers bien digne d'un enfant, Et même d'un être plus grand, II veut outrager ce qu'il aime , Lui fait une grimace , et le miroir la rend. Alors son dépit est extrême ; II lui montre un poing menaçant , II se \ nii menacé de même.
第38页 - Some kinds of sounds are better suited to produce these multiple resonances than others ; and it is an universal fact that wherever these subordinate sounds can be distinguished, there also the vowel qualities are heard ; and, reciprocally, when a sound puts on successively different vowel qualities, these multiple resonances are audible. The tongue of a Jew's harp, which so readily gives rise to these subordinate sounds, is obedient not only to the vowel sounds, but to almost all the articulations...

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