Letters which Have Appeared in the Banner of the Constitution: Addressed to the Editor

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T.W. Ustick, 1831 - 80 頁
 

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第 23 頁 - The mobs of great cities add just so much to the support of pure government, as sores do to the strength of the human body.
第 6 頁 - I maintain that sovereignty is in its nature indivisible. It is the supreme power in a State, and we might just as well speak of half a square, or half of a triangle, as of half a sovereignty.
第 6 頁 - ... surrender of them. A sovereign may delegate his powers to be exercised by as many agents as he may think proper, under such conditions and with such limitations as he may impose; but to surrender any portion of his sovereignty to another is to annihilate the whole.
第 23 頁 - Those who labor in the earth are the chosen people of God, if ever He had a chosen people, whose breast He has made his peculiar deposit for substantial.
第 23 頁 - While we have land to labor then, let us never wish to see our citizens occupied at a workbench, or twirling a distaff.
第 20 頁 - Under a system of perfectly free commerce, each country naturally devotes its capital and labour to such employments as are most beneficial to each. This pursuit of individual advantage is admirably connected with the universal good of the whole.
第 7 頁 - Laplace, and astronomy itself from a mere observation of insulated facts into that noble science which displays to our admiration the system of the universe. And shall this high power of the mind, which has effected such wonders when directed to the laws which control the material world, be forever prohibited, under a senseless cry of metaphysics...
第 18 頁 - Exorbitant duties on imported articles serve to beget a general spirit Of smuggling ; which is always prejudicial to the fair trader, and eventually to the revenue itself: they tend to render other classes of the community tributary, in an improper degree, to the manufacturing classes, to whom they give a premature monopoly of the markets : they sometimes force industry out of its most natural channels...
第 7 頁 - He held them to be subject to laws as fixed as matter itself, and to be as fit a subject for the application of the highest intellectual power. Denunciation may indeed fall upon the philosophical inquirer into these first principles, as it did upon Galileo and Bacon, when they first unfolded the great discoveries which have immortalized their names; but the time will come when truth will prevail in spite of Prejudice and denunciation, and when politics and legisition will be considered as much a...
第 7 頁 - It is the power •which raises man above the brute — which distinguishes his faculties from mere sagacity, which he holds in common with inferior animals. It is this power which has raised the astronomer from being a mere gazer at the stars to the high intellectual eminence of a Newton or Laplace, and astronomy itself from a mere observation of insulated facts into that noble science which displays to our admiration the system of the universe.

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