Introduction to the English Reader; Or, A Selection of Pieces in Prose and Poetry, Calculated to Improve the Younger Classes of Learners, in Reading: And to Imbue Their Minds with the Love of Virtue, with Rules and Observations for Assisting Children to Read with Propriety ...

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George Sherman, 1814 - 216页

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第165页 - Happy the man*, whose wish and care A few paternal acres bound, Content to breathe his native air In his own ground. Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire, Whose trees in summer yield him shade, In winter, fire.
第101页 - I then came home and went whistling all over the house, much pleased with my whistle, but disturbing all the family. My brothers and sisters, and cousins, understanding the bargain...
第192页 - And labours hard to store it well With the sweet food she makes. In works of labour or of skill I would be busy too: For Satan finds some mischief still For idle hands to do.
第151页 - Rest, little Young One, rest ; thou hast forgot the day When my Father found thee first in places far away ; Many flocks were on the hills, but thou wert own'd by none. And thy mother from thy side for evermore was gone.
第185页 - Hark ! they whisper ; angels say, Sister Spirit, come away. . What is this absorbs me quite ! Steals my senses, shuts my sight, Drowns my spirits, draws my breath ? Tell me, my soul!
第193页 - Though they bloom and look gay like the rose; Yet all our fond care to preserve them is vain, Time kills them as fast as he goes. Then I'll not be proud of my youth or my beauty, Since both of them wither and fade; But gain a good name by well doing my duty, This will scent like a rose when I'm dead.
第166页 - Tis the voice of the sluggard; I heard him complain, 'You have waked me too soon, I must slumber again.' As the door on its hinges, so he on his bed, Turns his sides and his shoulders and his heavy head. 'A little more sleep, and a little more slumber...
第173页 - BEHOLD, where, in a mortal form, Appears each grace divine ; The virtues, all in Jesus met, With mildest radiance shine. 2 To spread the rays of heavenly light, To give the mourner joy, To preach glad tidings to the poor, Was his divine employ. 3...
第170页 - Or in proud falls magnificently lost, But clear and artless, pouring through the plain Health to the sick, and solace to the swain. Whose causeway parts the vale with shady rows ? Whose seats the weary traveller repose ? Who tanght that heaven-directed spire to rise ? ' The Man of Ross,
第165页 - ... fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire, Whose trees in summer yield him shade. In winter fire. Blest, who can unconcern'dly find Hours, days, and years slide soft away. In health of body, peace of mind, Quiet by day. Sound sleep by night; study and ease, Together mixt; sweet recreation: And innocence, which most does please With meditation.

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