The Surgical Operations on President Cleveland in 1893

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G. W. Jacobs & Company, 1917 - 52页
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A part of the Duke Medical Center Library History of Medicine Ephemera Collection.
 

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第30页 - On Sunday, June 18, 1893, Dr. RM O'Reilly — later Surgeon-General of the United States Army — the official medical attendant on officers of the government in Washington, examined a rough place on the roof of Mr. Cleveland's mouth. He found an ulcer as large as a quarter of a dollar, extending from the molar teeth to within one third of an inch of the middle line, and encroaching slightly on the soft palate, and some diseased bone.
第38页 - The entire left upper jaw was removed from the first bicuspid tooth to just beyond the last molar, and nearly up to the middle line.
第20页 - Democrats on a platform demanding the free and unlimited coinage of silver and gold at the ratio of 16 to 1.
第26页 - If we have developed an unexpected capacity for the assimilation of a largely increased volume of the currency, and even if we have demonstrated the usefulness of such an increase, these conditions fall far short of insuring us against disaster if, in the present situation, we enter upon the dangerous and reckless experiment of free, unlimited, and independent silver coinage.
第44页 - ... dropped anchor at Gray Gables, and the patient walked from the launch to his residence with little apparent effort. A second slight operation twelve days later, and the surgical work was over. Dr. Kasson C. Gibson, of New York, then fitted Mr. Cleveland with an artificial jaw of vulcanized rubber and "when it was in place the President's speech was excellent, even its quality not being altered.
第38页 - ... minutes elapsed after the administration of the ether before they had concluded their task. In that time they removed the entire left upper jaw from the first bicuspid tooth to just beyond the last molar, and took out a part of the palate; this extensive operation being necessary, writes Dr. Keen, "because we found that the antrum — the large hollow cavity in the upper jaw — was partly filled with a gelatinous mass, evidently a sarcoma.
第40页 - What a sigh of intense relief we surgeons breathed," writes Dr. Keen, "when the patient was once more safe in bed can hardly be imagined!
第29页 - The operation itself was as nothing compared with scores that both of us had performed; but on it hung the life not only of a human being and an illustrious ruler but the destiny of a nation. It was by far the most responsible operation in which I ever took part.
第33页 - I reached New York City in the evening," writes Dr. Keen, "went to Pier A, and was taken over to the yacht, which was lying at anchor at a considerable distance from the Battery. Dr. EG Janeway, of New York; Dr. O'Reilly; Dr. John F. Erdmann, Dr. Bryant's assistant; and Dr. Hasbrouck had also secretly gone to the yacht. The President, Dr. Bryant and Secretary Lamont, at a later hour, arrived from Washington, and openly drove to Pier A, whence they were taken to the yacht. . . . On arriving on the...
第33页 - ... EG Janeway, of New York; Dr. O'Reilly; Dr. John F. Erdmann, Dr. Bryant's assistant; and Dr. Hasbrouck had also secretly gone to the yacht. The President, Dr. Bryant and Secretary Lamont, at a later hour, arrived from Washington, and openly drove to Pier A, whence they were taken to the yacht. . . . On arriving on the yacht, the President lighted a cigar, and we sat on deck smoking and chatting until near midnight. Once he burst out with, 'Oh, Doctor Keen, those office seekers! Those office seekers...

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