The Hive: Or, A Collection of Thoughts on Civil, Moral, Sentimental and Religious Subjects: Selected from the Writings of Near One Hundred of the Best Authors of Different Nations; But Chiefly from the English Writers. Intended as a Repository of Sententious, Ingenious, and Pertinent Sayings, in Verse and Prose ...

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Oliver D. Cooke, 1810 - 216 頁

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第 30 頁 - Ah! little think the gay licentious proud, Whom pleasure, power, and affluence surround — They who their thoughtless hours in giddy mirth, And wanton, often cruel, riot waste — Ah! little think they, while they dance along, How many feel, this very moment, death And all the sad variety of pain...
第 118 頁 - Whatsoever ye would that men should do unto you, even so do unto them ; for this is the law and the prophets.
第 31 頁 - How many drink the cup Of baleful grief, or eat the bitter bread Of misery. Sore pierced by wintry winds, How many shrink into the sordid hut Of cheerless poverty.
第 173 頁 - OF all the causes which conspire to blind Man's erring judgment, and misguide the mind, What the weak head with strongest bias rules, Is pride, the never-failing vice of fools.
第 66 頁 - ... the body of it. Education, after the same manner, when it works upon a noble mind, draws out to view every latent virtue and perfection, which without such helps are never able to make their appearance.
第 195 頁 - True happiness is of a retired nature, and an enemy to pomp and noise ; it arises, in the first place, from the enjoyment of one's self ; and, in the next, from the friendship and conversation of a few select companions...
第 200 頁 - Good name in man and woman, dear my lord, Is the immediate jewel of their souls : Who steals my purse, steals trash ; 'tis something, nothing ; 'Twas mine, 'tis his, and has been slave to thousands : But he that filches from me my good name Robs me of that which not enriches him, And makes me poor indeed, Oth.
第 42 頁 - INQUIRIES after happiness, and rules for attaining it, are not so necessary and useful to mankind as the arts of consolation, and supporting one's self under affliction. The utmost we can hope for in this world is contentment ; if we aim at any thing higher, we shall meet with nothing but grief and disappointment. A man should direct all his studies and endeavours at making himself easy now, and happy hereafter.
第 30 頁 - Ah little think they, while they dance along, How many feel, this very moment, death And all the sad variety of pain. How many sink in the devouring flood, Or more devouring flame. How many bleed, By shameful variance betwixt man and man. How many pine in want, and dungeon glooms ; Shut from the common air, and common use Of their own limbs.
第 194 頁 - That calm and elegant satisfaction which the vulgar call melancholy is the true and proper delight of men of knowledge and virtue.

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