Speeches of Lord Erskine: While at the Bar

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Callaghan, 1876 - 533 頁
 

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第 588 頁 - ... is in the close affection which grows from common names, from kindred blood, from similar privileges, and equal protection. These are ties, which, though light as air, are as strong as links of iron. Let the colonies always keep the idea of their civil rights associated with your government; — they will cling and grapple to you ; and no force under heaven will be of power to tear them from their allegiance.
第 588 頁 - My hold of the colonies is in the close affection which grows from common names, from kindred blood, from similar privileges, and equal protection. These are ties which, though light as air, are strong as links of iron.
第 206 頁 - ... will entirely lose its force when it is shown (by a seasonable exertion of the laws) that the press cannot be abused to any bad purpose, without incurring a suitable punishment ; whereas it never can be used to any good one when under the control of an inspector. So true will it be found, that to censure the licentiousness is to / maintain the liberty of the press.
第 205 頁 - To subject the press to the restrictive power of a licenser, as was formerly done, both before and since the revolution, is to subject all freedom of sentiment to the prejudices of one man, and make him the arbitrary and infallible judge of all controverted points in learning, religion, and government.
第 152 頁 - This species of universal subserviency, that makes the very servant who waits behind your chair the arbiter of your life and fortune, has such a tendency to degrade and abase mankind, and to deprive them of that assured and liberal state of mind, which alone can make us what we ought to be, that I vow to God I would sooner bring myself to put a man to immediate death for opinions I disliked...
第 204 頁 - The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state ; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter when published. [ 152 ] Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public : to forbid this, is to destroy the freedom of the press : but if he publishes what is improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequence of his own temerity.
第 514 頁 - The rights of men, that is to say, the natural rights of mankind, are indeed sacred things; and if any public measure is proved mischievously to affect them, the objection ought to be fatal to that measure, even if no charter at all could be set up against it.
第 66 頁 - ... adverting to the exact measure of wickedness and injustice necessary to their execution, and complaining only of the excess as the immorality, considering her authority as a dispensation for breaking the commands of God, and the breach of them as only punishable when contrary to the ordinances of man ? " Such a proceeding, Gentlemen, begets serious reflections. It would be better, perhaps, for the masters and the servants of all such governments to join in supplication that the great Author of...
第 389 頁 - And further to fulfil, perfect, and bring to effect their most evil and wicked treason and treasonable...
第 63 頁 - To be governed at all, they must be governed with a rod of iron ; and our empire in the East would, long since, have been lost to Great Britain, if civil skill and military prowess had not united their efforts to support an authority — which Heaven never gave — by means which it never can sanction.

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