Titus Andronicus

封面
Cambridge University Press, 2006 - 180 頁
The New Cambridge Shakespeare appeals to students worldwide for its up-to-date scholarship and emphasis on performance. The series features line-by-line commentaries and textual notes on the plays and poems. Introductions are regularly refreshed with accounts of new critical, stage and screen interpretations. For this second edition of Titus Andronicus Sue Hall-Smith has written a new section on recent scholarship and important contemporary performances of the play. The edition retains the text prepared by Alan Hughes, based on the first quarto and supplemented by crucial additions and stage directions from the Folio. In the introduction, Hughes contradicts the historically popular view that Titus Andronicus is a poor play of dubious authorship. Joining the growing ranks of critics who take the play seriously, Hughes applauds its thematic unity and grim humour, and demonstrates that it is the work of a brilliant stage craftsman, confident in his mastery of space, movement and verse.
 

讀者評論 - 撰寫評論

我們找不到任何評論。

內容

titus People of Rome and peoples tribunes here
76
Romes royal mistress mistress of my heart
77
Warrants these words in princely courtesy
78
My sons would never so dishonour me 295
79
Sith priest and holy water are so near
80
lucius Dear father soul and substance of us all
82
That brought her for this high good turn so far?
83
Tis thou and those that have dishonoured me
84
As will revenge these bitter woes of ours
116
That with his pretty buzzing melody
118
marcus Sit down sweet niece brother sit down by me
121
marcus O heavens can you hear a good man groan
123
aaron Pray to the devils the gods have given us
125
demetrius Villain what hast thou done?
126
My son and I will have the wind of you
128
And be received for the emperors heir
129

Take up this good old man and cheer the heart
85
I found a friend and sure as death I swore
86
Than is Prometheus tied to Caucasus
87
I tell you lords you do but plot your deaths
89
That both should speed?
90
There speak and strike brave boys and take your turns
91
saturninus And you have rung it lustily my lords
92
The birds chant melody on every bush
93
Which never hopes more heaven than rests in thee
94
Are singled forth to try thy experiments
95
A barren detested vale you see it is
96
demetrius Stay madam here is more belongs to her
97
The lion moved with pity did endure
98
demetrius Away For thou hast stayed us here too long
99
How these were they that made away his brother
100
As hateful as Cocytus misty mouth
101
saturninus Now to the bottom dost thou search my wound
102
saturninus If it be proved You see it is apparent
103
chiron And twere my cause I should go hang myself
104
Doth burn the heart to cinders where it is
105
In dangerous wars whilst you securely slept
106
30
107
marcus
109
And made a brinepit with our bitter tears?
110
titus Now stay your strife what shall be is dispatched
112
When heaven doth weep doth not the earth oerflow? 220
113
The vow is made Come brother take a head
115
Terras Astraea reliquit
130
Take wreak on Rome for this ingratitude
131
Of my word I have written to effect 60
132
titus Why villain art not thou the carrier? 85
133
Knock at my door and tell me what he says
134
In Saturninus health whom if he sleep
135
I know from whence this same device proceeds
136
Is the sun dimmed that gnats do fly in it?
137
51 Flourish Enter lucius with an army of goths with
138
Peace tawny slave half me and half thy dam
139
aaron Tut Lucius this was but a deed of charity
141
She sounded almost at my pleasing tale
142
But to torment you with my bitter tongue 150
143
Is it your trick to make me ope the door
144
And if one arms embracement will content thee
146
tamora
147
This do thou for my love and so let him
148
Oft have you heard me wish for such an hour
149
And this the banquet she shall surfeit on
150
lucius Away inhuman dog unhallowed slave
151
He kills Saturninus
153
Heres Romes young captain let him tell the tale
154
Or more than any living man could bear
155
O take this warm kiss on thy pale cold lips
156
aaron Ah why should wrath be mute and fury dumb?
157
TEXTUAL ANALYSIS
159

其他版本 - 查看全部

常見字詞

關於作者 (2006)

William Shakespeare, 1564 - 1616 Although there are many myths and mysteries surrounding William Shakespeare, a great deal is actually known about his life. He was born in Stratford-Upon-Avon, son of John Shakespeare, a prosperous merchant and local politician and Mary Arden, who had the wealth to send their oldest son to Stratford Grammar School. At 18, Shakespeare married Anne Hathaway, the 27-year-old daughter of a local farmer, and they had their first daughter six months later. He probably developed an interest in theatre by watching plays performed by traveling players in Stratford while still in his youth. Some time before 1592, he left his family to take up residence in London, where he began acting and writing plays and poetry. By 1594 Shakespeare had become a member and part owner of an acting company called The Lord Chamberlain's Men, where he soon became the company's principal playwright. His plays enjoyed great popularity and high critical acclaim in the newly built Globe Theatre. It was through his popularity that the troupe gained the attention of the new king, James I, who appointed them the King's Players in 1603. Before retiring to Stratford in 1613, after the Globe burned down, he wrote more than three dozen plays (that we are sure of) and more than 150 sonnets. He was celebrated by Ben Jonson, one of the leading playwrights of the day, as a writer who would be "not for an age, but for all time," a prediction that has proved to be true. Today, Shakespeare towers over all other English writers and has few rivals in any language. His genius and creativity continue to astound scholars, and his plays continue to delight audiences. Many have served as the basis for operas, ballets, musical compositions, and films. While Jonson and other writers labored over their plays, Shakespeare seems to have had the ability to turn out work of exceptionally high caliber at an amazing speed. At the height of his career, he wrote an average of two plays a year as well as dozens of poems, songs, and possibly even verses for tombstones and heraldic shields, all while he continued to act in the plays performed by the Lord Chamberlain's Men. This staggering output is even more impressive when one considers its variety. Except for the English history plays, he never wrote the same kind of play twice. He seems to have had a good deal of fun in trying his hand at every kind of play. Shakespeare wrote 154 sonnets, all published on 1609, most of which were dedicated to his patron Henry Wriothsley, The Earl of Southhampton. He also wrote 13 comedies, 13 histories, 6 tragedies, and 4 tragecomedies. He died at Stratford-upon-Avon April 23, 1616, and was buried two days later on the grounds of Holy Trinity Church in Stratford. His cause of death was unknown, but it is surmised that he knew he was dying.

書目資訊