Horae Ionicae: A Poem, Descriptive of the Ionian Islands, and Part of the Adjacent Coast of Greece

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1809 - 67 頁
 

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第 22 頁 - The lonely mountains o'er And the resounding shore A voice of weeping heard, and loud lament; From haunted spring and dale Edged with poplar pale The parting Genius is with sighing sent; With flower-inwoven tresses torn The Nymphs in twilight shade of tangled thickets mourn.
第 45 頁 - The modern Greeks still retain a variety of traditional stories, which they derive from classical antiquity; their national dance they pretend had its origin in the days of Theseus, and consider it as emblematical of that hero's adventures in the labyrinth; and the strain which accompanies it, is said to be the lamentation of Ariadne, when deserted by him at Naxos.
第 44 頁 - Soft breathing gales their gather'd sweets dispense From thousand aromatic plants, that grow In wild luxuriance on the mountain's brow ; From cultur'd fields, where blooms the early vine, And embryo blossoms swell with future wine; But chiefly thence, where, clad in vernal bloom, The grape of Corinth * sheds its rich perfume. Still is the landscape ; nature sleeps around ; All motion dead, and hush'd is ev'ry sound; Save where the unyok'd heifer roams at large, Or the rude goatherd tends his wand'ring...
第 52 頁 - Alpheum fama est hue Elidis amnem Occultas egisse vias subter mare : qui nunc Ore, Arethusa, tuo Siculis confunditur undis.
第 60 頁 - Plato rears. Such as of old, on Sunium's rocky side, Or where Ilissus' sacred waters glide, From reason's light he taught the list'ning youth Of moral beauty, and eternal truth ; Or in mysterious symbols half conceal'd The secret lore which Memphis had reveal'd. Now, clear'd from mortal mists, his eagle sight Expatiates freely through the realms of light : Inspir'd by truth he sings in bolder strain What pow'r combines creation's golden chain ; How worlds obey the...
第 60 頁 - Till, rising with its theme, the lofty ode Ascends from nature to the throne of God. Unseen celestial beings hover nigh And pour their sweet accordant minstrelsy ; Through boundless space the sacred hymn prolong, And worlds unnumber'd join the choral song. But cease, my Muse ! for not to thee is given On earth to emulate the songs of heav'n : No sister thou, but handmaid of the Nine ; And least of all their train as I of thine. Immortal themes a master's hand requireIn silence 1 adore, and trembling...
第 3 頁 - Where April wantons in luxuriant bloom, No longer vocal to your native lyre, Forgive the daring strain your charms inspire ; Though all unworthy of the meed ye claim, A meed as deathless as your ancient fame. For well I know, that not to me belong The lofty raptures of poetick song : My simple Muse in fancy's gilded ray May sport, the insect of a summer day ; May sparkle, like the dew-drop on the flower ; But never please beyond the transient hour.
第 37 頁 - Thy vine-clad hills, and deep sequester7*! glades ! Soft are the gales that o'er thy bosom stray, And mild the beams that on thy mountains play. What though no spreading oak or lofty plane Here mark the honours of the Sylvan reign ! With rapture we survey thy humbler groves, Still bending as the changeful Zephyr moves. By Acroteria's steep we pass along, Whose echoing cliffs repeat the boatman's song ; Then to our destin'd station bear away, And moor our vessel in the shelter'd bay. Sure 'tis enchantment...
第 3 頁 - Ye isles beyond the Adriatic wave! Whose classic shores Ionian waters lave ; Ye plains of Greece! the Muse's ancient pride, Whose rising beauties crown the western tide ; That smile beneath November's deepest gloom ; Where April wantons in luxuriant bloom, No longer vocal to your native lyre, Forgive the daring strain your charms inspire ; Though all unworthy of the meed ye claim, A meed as deathless as your ancient fame. For well I know, that not to me belong The lofty raptures of...
第 66 頁 - ... to the English pronunciation of the Greek language seeks in vain for that full, sonorous cadence which early habits ' have taught us to admire, and finds in its stead an acute, stridulous combination of sounds, which is far from being either agreeable or harmonious; while the mind is disgusted at the barbarous structure of a dialect which confounds the anomalies of ancient and modern grammar.

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