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God hath not despised them. And if God is pleased to work by them, and if the succession, with all its means and appliances, and state advantages, was never honoured with triumphs like these, then what good is it? By what Jamaica is, and by what Canterbury is not, we see that it is good for nothing but to be cast out, and to be trodden under foot of men.

CHAPTER IX.

APOSTOLIC SUCCESSION ARROGANT AND INTOLERANT.

Estimate of Dissenting Ministers-Collier's view of clerical

dignity-dominion over the poor-middling classes—feudal times—offertory-keys of heaven-bill of costs for getting a young man into heaven-clergy wish to stand in the place of Christ-mistaken opinions visited with greater punishment than crimes-case of Rev. H. E. Head-ecclesiastical courts, nuisances-called so by Lord Denman-Civil rulers more just than spiritual rulers.

Man - proud man
Dressed in his little brief authority,
Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven,
As make the angels weep !

NONCONFORMIST ministers; venerable for years, for intellectual endowments, and for righteousness of life, - eloquent preachers, — faithful translators of the bible,-authors of works that do honour to the age, and that shall live when the age shall be no more ;-labourers in the Lord's vineyard, who have borne the burden and heat of the day,—the clergy, with an overweening conceit of their own exclusive sanctity and apostolic descent, regard with feelings of sovereign contempt, and often a mere stripling, with no other seals to his ministry, than the dry formalities of episcopal ordination* calls them intruders into the sacred office, and consigns them over to the uncovenanted mercies of God. He can associate with fox-hunters, dancers, card-players,t gamblers, horse-racers, and with all those who walk according to the course of this world; but he cannot associate with ministers who have nothing to recommend them but piety and usefulness, and moral fitness for the high vocation to which they are called. Or, even if he repudiate these inconsistencies in his order, and is one of evangelic doctrine, and of blameless life, they are still looked upon by him with coolness, if not contempt; and all inducement to act in concert or in correspondence with such characters is met by the question of privilege. “What! I, an apostolic successor -1, one of the spiritual aristocracy,--asacred functionary sanctioned by the state, can I be found on the same platform, or in the same society with the dissenting teacher, advoca

* The next generation will I trust see fewer of these marrying and christening machines--Southey, in Life of Wilberforce.

+ I can't help saying that in my opinion a prince made bựt a lean figure in comparison of an apostle. A prince can bestow marks of distinction, and posts of honor and authority; but he can't give the Holy Ghost; he can't register his favorites among the quality of .heaven, nor entitle them to the bliss of eternity.

Bishop Collier, in No. 74. † Clergymen in Canterbury have refused to meet dissenting ministers on the platform of the Bible Society.

§ A very fair specimen of this arrogant spirit may be seen in Mr. Glover's address to the dissenters of Charlton. It is however a very silly affair, as the following extract, will clearly shew, “ It is therefore strictly legal to say,' " the pretended Rev. Jabez Bunting," ecclesiastically speaking writes a friend, “ the man is a gentile gnostick."

The same authority likewise seriously contends that it is wrong for dissenting ministers to wear black coats and white cravats !

ting the cause of humanity, or any other cause directly or indirectly connected with our common salvation ?" It is in this manner that the notion of the exclusive validity of episcopal orders, or of apostolic descent induces that temper of foolish pride as utterly opposed to the dictates of reason, as it is to the charity which vaunteth not itself, and which is such a necessary element in the character of a holy man of God.

The same spirit of arrogance, and of lofty bearing is likewise manifested towards the poor;-* and were it not for that bulwark of our civil and religious privilegesthe middling classes, this nation would be ruled by the priesthood, and ruled as with a rod of iron, and the darkness of Portugal or Spain would soon overshadow the land. They have already expressed a wish for a return to the venerable usages of the feudal times.p And why is this desired! Because those times were favorable to the power of the clergy, and to the bondage of the people. And why all this ado about the restoration of the offertory? Is it for the sake of the poor? or for the sake of gaining an increase to their own power, and of domination over them. When we reflect how the poor have been deprived of their right to one

* According to an old Popish writer, the clergy are as the mountain, and the laity as the beasts that might not touch the mountain lest they be consumed.-Cumming.

+ Sermon by Bishop of London, in St. James' Church, Feb. 1844.

+

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third of the tithe of this country; this newborn zeal for their interests looks very suspicious, and almost renders inevitable a conclusion most unfavourable to the disinterestedness of those who are now pleading so loudly in their behalf.

How extremely arrogant is their claim to the keys of the kingdom of Heaven. They not only profess to hold those keys, but likewise to hold a discretionary power in making use of them.* Let this monstrous claim be an article of general belief, and they will have an engine of spiritual despotism that will enable them to ride roughshod over the heads of the people. That the most extravagant honour and estimation of their own importance-yea, to be regarded as Christ himself is most agreeable to their wishes is evident: for they say, "if tempted, as any of us may be, hastily and needlessly to forsake the church, let us reply to the temptation, by addressing her in words somewhat similar to those of Peter to his divine Master :

* That Puseyism is no new thing will appear from the following bill of costs. 1804

Maidstone Kent.
Mr. Honeyman, Dr.

To the Rev. T-
May 24,

To writing two letters ; attending your son in prison, preparing his soul for an immortal state £1 58. Od. and sending him to God as a Christian.

The original is in the possession of the executors of a dissenting minister who died a few years ago in this city. What an awful absurdity; yet as Puseyite Clergymen profess to make Christians, and to hold the keys of the kingdom of heaven and to receive tithes and rates, and fees, as a remuneration for making use of those keys, this clerical bill of costs is perfectly consistent with the genius of their system.

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