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Earnestly approving of the pion of such a national organ, long needed and of most imporance the undesigned agree to contribute for its pages from time to time, such onas may be requisite to set sooth and defend the doctrines held by the united Whig Party of th Union.

George P. Marsh of Vermo W. S. Archer of Virginia.

J. R. Intersoll of Philadelphio.
T L Clingman of North Carolina.
Daniel Webster
Rufus Choate.
Robert C. Winthron.
Hamilton Fish of New York City.

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Alexander H. Stephens, Ga.
D. D. Bonard of Albany.
E. Joy Morris, of Philadelphia.
John Macpherson Bertion of Goa.
Thomas Bullet King of Georgia.
J. P. Kennedy of Baltimore.

Colone of Vernon. John J. Hardin, of Illinois. The reasons leading to the design of this Review are many and obvious There has long been and, it is food, will be a faction in the Republic, assuming popular soons, but led on by demagogues, agains the true interests of the country. Under such guidto they have already indicted many injuries on the body of the Commonwealth-love oped out commerce, reduced out manufactures, diminished our revenue, dissipated out to deanged our currency disonored our schools, corrupted popular suito yet solo Executive power, liminished the hard earnings of the laborer, and placed a disastrous chool on the whole course of internal improvements. In addition to these injuries, they are promulgating or giving countenance to the most doorous doctrines. That low should have no vitality or force apart from the popular will to loislation is to be no more stable than party power; that contracts and coven outs of to-day may set aside by a change of majorities to-morrow that the solemn seals of judicature, and the tribunals of justice, are to be directly controlled by the populace that change in a word is pro

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The position of the times and the stand now necessarily to be occupied by this Review, make it proper to say something of the work and its prospects. Since the issue of the first number a significant and most eventful change has come over the aspect of things. Against all just calculation, by slander, falsehood, and illegal suffrages, Henry Clay, and the Whig party, and the best hopes of the Nation, have been defeated. But we are not vanquished—we are still the same—and more honored by such adversity than our opponents in their prosperity. We are in reality stronger than when our forces were marshalled for the conflict—occupying a prouder eminence, with a clearer vision, and with something, may we trust, of hard-learned wisdom to counsel us for future action. In our principles we have practically conquered, and, by any just computation—arraying fairly the conservative elements of the country—we are a majority of the American People. It is for the Whig party, therefore, still to stand unbroken, undismayed, unwavering. The battle is but just begun. New issues must constantly arise to bind us closer together; and the positions already long occupied by us, though falsely assumed, in part, by the enemy, for purposes of the hour, must naturally revert to our sole possession, or become in their disjointed body the elements of dissolution. At such a time, is it necessary to urge upon any one the importance of sustaining a National Review, corresponding to that which the Democratic party have long made an organ of influence so ably pernicious Certainly, it is now more needed than ever before since we were a nation. Great questions are to be argued—great public measures are to be assailed or defended; and it is time that the people in different sections who are alike opposed to radicalism, corruption and misrule, had on all definite matters of State greater uniformity of sentiment. Unanimity alone gives power. And aside from Politics, the state of American Philosophy and Literature, so replete with speculative error and false principles of taste, demands an earnest and vigorous organ, which may penetrate every part of the land and gradually influence the opinions of the o and rising generations. To these ends the “American Review” was begun: for these ends we ask for it the support of the country. It is gratifying to be able to state, that notwithstanding the result of the Election, unexpected encouragement has been extended to the work from every section of the Union. Its mere continuance is beyond contingency. But all know that, to be stamped with any effective and permanent power, it must have a liberal subscription, through which its writers may be liberally paid. We have certainly a most powerful and accomplished band of contributors; and no pains will be spared, or means left unemployed, to make this the first of American Periodicals. ay we hope, then, for this work a support commensurate with its importance. We ask its friends every where, to do something more than give their good wishes. If every one willing to subscribe himself would obtain one additional subscription from a friend, the highest hopes and desires of its conductors would soon be realized. (G. A word with respect to Engravings. Our readers will remember that our notices have advertised three or four a year. But in the notice prefixed to No. I., an engraving was promised for No. II. This was to be alikeness of John Quincy Adams, taken from a portrait, pronounced by Daniel Webster and other distinguished judges, as well as Mr. Adams himself, to be the finest ever executed of him. The portrait was placed in the hands of a skillful artist; but as the time, after receiving the portrait, was short—the most finished execution being resolved upon—besides that the remaining embellishments for the year would otherwise appear at very long intervals—it was concluded to give the likeness of Mr. Adams in the No. for May. The other engravings for the year, will be from portraits of Daniel Webster and Hugh S. Legare, t * in the summer and autumn. - n the present No., owing to the unexpected length of two or three important articles, several short reviews and notices were crowded out, but will appear in the next. . . The appearance of the story, “Jack Long; or, Lynch Law and Vengeance,” may need a word of explanation. The writer of the tale, some time in the autumn, furnished to the “Democratic Review” an article founded upon the same incidents. It seems that the MS. was accidentally misplaced at that office, and after repeated search was finally considered to be lost. It was then, without the knowledge of the Editor of the “Democratic Review,” rewritten for this Review—and it was not until both Reviews were in press, too late for alteration in either, that the author was 'informed it had been found and inserted in the “Democratic.”

Our Southern friends are informed, that Mr. C. W. WEBBER, a gentleman from Kentucky, interested in the establishment of the Review, will travel through portions of the South to promote that object. It is hoped his efforts will be seconded by every earnest-minded friend of a cause—beaten, not vanqnished.

WOL. I. FEBRUARY, 1845.
CONTENTS.
THE RESULT of THE ELECTION, - - - - -
JACK LoNG; OR, LYNCH LAW AND VENGEANCE.-By a Kentuckian,
PATENT PROPERTY, . - - - - - - -
THE RAVEN.—By — Quarles, . - - - - -
LITERARY PRosPECTs of 1845.—By E. A. D., - - -
ALIson’s HistoRY of EUROPE, - - • - -
sonNET, . - - - - - - - 2 -
words.-By E. P. Whipple, - - - - - -
GOETHE’s CHARACTER of EGMONT, . - - - -
LovE AND FRIENDSHIP ; EPIGRAM.–By Horus, - -
DoING NoTHING witH MUCH ADo, - - - - -
Post of FICE REFoRM, . - - - - - - *
CRITICAL NoTICEs, . - - - - - - -
FoREIGN MISCELLANY, . - - - - - -
NEW - YORK;

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No. II

131 121 137 143 146 151 177 178 183 194 195 199 215 219

161, BROADwAY ; AND 6, waterloo PLACE, REGENT-STREET, LONDON. PRINcIPAL AGENTs.---Vermont, V. Harrington, Burlington; Boston, Jordan, Swift

& Co.; Rhode Island, H. Whiteker, Providence; Zieber & Co.,
Philadelphia; Shurtz & Taylor, Baltimore.

Edward O. Jenk in s, Printer, 11 4 JV as s a u-street.

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