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'Till lengthen'd on to FAITH, and unconfin'd,
It pours the blifs that fills up all the mind.
He fees, why Nature plants in Man alone
345
Hope of known blifs, and Faith in bliss unknown:
(Nature, whofe dictates to no other kind

Are giv'n in vain, but what they seek they find)
Wife is her present; fhe connects in this
His greatest Virtue with his greatest Bliss ;
At once his own bright prospect to be bleft,
And strongest motive to affist the rest.

Self-love thus pufh'd to focial, to divine,
Gives thee to make thy neighbour's bleffing thine.
Is this too little for the boundless heart?
Extend it, let thy enemies have part:

355

Grafp the whole worlds of Reason, Life, and Sense,
In one close fyftem of Benevolence:
Happier as kinder, in whate'er degree,
And height of Blifs but height of Charity.

350

360

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temper of mortal men.” Τῷ δὲ μηδὲν ἑαυτῷ ἀδικον ξύνει δέτε ἡδεῖα ἐλπὶς ἀεὶ πάρεςι, καὶ ἀγαθὴ γηροςόφος, ὡς καὶ Πίνδαρος λέγει. Χαριένως γάς τι, ὦ Σώκραίες, τέτ ̓ ἐκεῖνος εἶπεν, ὅτι ὃς ἂν δικαίως καὶ ὁσίως τὸν βίον διαγάγῃ, γλυκεῖα οἱ καρδίαν ἀτάλλεσα γης ζόφος συναορεῖ ἐλπὶς, ἃ μάλιςα θναλῶν πολύςροφον γνώμαν κυβέρνα, In the fame manner Euripides speaks in his Hercules furens,

Οὗτος δ ̓ ἀνὴς ἄξιδος, ὅσις ἐλπίσιν

$105.

Πέποιθεν αἰεί. τὸ δ ̓ ἀπορεῖν, ἀνδρὸς κακῆ.

"He is the good man in whose breaft Hope Springs eternally: "But to be without Hope in the world is the portion of the "wicked."

God loves from Whole to Parts: But human foul Muft rife from Individual to the Whole.

Self-love but serves the virtuous mind to wake,
As the fmall pebble stirs the peaceful lake;
The centre mov'd, a circle strait fucceeds,
Another still, and still another spreads;
Friend, parent, neighbour, first it will embrace;
His country next; and next all human race;
Wide and more wide, th' o'erflowings of the mind
Take ev'ry creature in, of ev'ry kind;
Earth smiles around, with boundless bounty bleft,
And Heav'n beholds its image in his breast.

370

Come then, my Friend! my Genius! come along; Oh mafter of the poet, and the fong!

374

365

VER. 373. Come then, my Friend! ctc.] This noble Apoftrophe, by which the Poet concludes the Effay in an addrefs to his friend, will furnish a Critic with examples of every one of those five Species of Elocution, from which, as from its Sources, Longinus deduceth the SUBLIME.

VARIATIONS.

VER. 373. Come then, my Friend! etc.] In the MS. thus,
And now transported o'er so vaft a Plain,

While the wing'd courfer flies with all her rein,
While heav'n-ward now her mounting wing the feels,
Now scatter'd fools fly trembling from her heels,
Wilt thou, my St. John! keep her course in fight,
Confine her fury and affift her flight?

And while the Mufe now ftoops, or now afcends, To Man's low paffions, or their glorious ends,

1. The first and chief is a Grandeur and Sublimity of Cenception a

Come then, my Friend! my Genius! come along,
O Master of the Poet, and the Song!

And while the Mufe now ftoops, and now afcends,

To Man's low paffions, or their glorious ends,

2. The Second, that Pathetic Enthufiafm, which, at the fame Time, melts and inflames:

Teach me, like thee, in various nature wife,
To fall with dignity, with temper rife,
Form'd by thy converse, happily to steer
From grave to gay, from lively to severe ;
Correct with spirit, eloquent with ease,
Intent to reafon, or polite to please.

3. A certain elegant Formation and Ordonance of Figures:
O! while along the fiream of Time thy name
Expanded flies, and gathers all its fame,
Say, fhall my little bark attendant fail,
Pursue the triumph, and partake the gale!
4. A fplendid Diction :

When statesmen, heroes, kings, in duft repose,
Whofe fons fhall blush their fathers were thy foes,
Shall then this verfe to future age pretend
Thou wert my guide, philofopher, and friend?

a

· πέντε πηγαί τινές εἰσιν τὸ ὑψηγορίας. 1. Πρῶτον μὲν καὶ κράτιςον τὸ περὶ τὰς νοήσεις ἀδρεπήβολον. 2. Δεύτερον δὲ τὸ σφοδρὸν καὶ ἐνθεσιαςικὲν πάθω. 3· Ποιὰ τῶν σχημάτων πλάσις. 4. Η γενναῖα φράσις. 5. Πέμπτη δὲ μεγέθες αἰτία, καὶ συγκλείσα τὰ πρὸ ἑαυτῆς ἁπανία, ἡ ἐν ἀξιώματι καὶ διάρκει σύνθεση

Teach me, like thee, in various nature wife,
To fall with dignity, with temper rife;
Form'd by thy converfe, happily to fteer
From grave to gay, from lively to fevere;
Correct with fpirit, eloquent with ease,
Intent to reafon, or polite to please.
Oh! while along the ftream of Time thy name
Expanded flies, and gathers all its fame;
= Say, fhall my little bark attendant fail,

Pursue the triumph, and partake the gale?
When statesmen, heroes, kings, in duft repose,
Whose fons fhall blush their fathers were thy foes,
Shall then this verfe to future age pretend
Thou wert my guide, philofopher, and friend? 390
That urg'd by thee, I turn'd the tuneful art
From founds to things, from fancy to the heart;
For Wit's falfe mirror held up Nature's light;
Shew'd erring Pride, WHATEVER IS, IS RIGHT;

That, urg'd by thee, I turn'd the tuneful art,
From founds to things, from fancy to the heart;
For Wit's falfe mirror held up Nature's light;

Shew'd erring Pride whatever is, is RIGHT;

That REASON, PASSION, answer one great AIM;
That true SELF-LOVE and SOCIAL are the SAME;
That VIRTUE only makes our BLISS below;
And all our Knowledge is OURSELVES TO KNOW.

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385

5. And fifthly, which includes in itself all the reft, a Weight and Dignity in the Compofition:

That REASON, PASSION, anfwer one great aim; 395
That true SELF-LOVE and SOCIAL are the fame ;
That VIRTUE only makes our Bliss below;
And all our Knowledge is, OURSELVES TO KNOW.

VARIATION S.

VER. 397. That Virtue only, etc.] in the MS. thus,
That just to find a God is all we can,

And all the Study of Mankind is Man.

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