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one vast morass; the Chickahominy rose. The enemy, no longer occupied in guard to a higher stage than had been known for ing his own capital, poured his troops years before. Pursuing the advance, the northward, entered Maryland, threatened crossings were seized, and the right wing Pennsylvania, and even Washington itself. extended to effect a junction with re-en- Elated by his recent victories, and assured forcements now promised and earnestly that our troops were disorganized and dig. desired, and upon the arrival of which the pirited, he was confident that the seat of complete success of the campaign seemed war was now permanently transferred to clear. The brilliant battle of Hanover the loyal States, and that his own exCourt House was fought, which opened hausted soil was to be relieved from the the way for the first corps, with the aid of burden of supporting two hostile armies. which, had it come, we should then have But he did not understand the spirit which gone into the enemy's capital. It never animated the soldiers of the Union. I shall came. The bravest army could not do more, not, nor can I living, forget that when I under such overwhelming disappointment, was ordered to the command of the troops than the army of the Potomac then did. ( for the defence of the capital, the soldiers Fair Oaks attests their courage and.endu- with whom I had shared so much of the rance when they hurled back, again and anxiety, and pain, and suffering of the war, again, the vastly superior masses of the had not lost their confidence in me as their enemy. But mortal men could not accom-commander. They sprang to my call with plish the miracle that seemed to have been all their ancient vigor, discipline, anil expected of them. But one course was courage. I led them into Maryland. Fif. left-a flank march in the face of a power-teen days after they had fallen back deful enemy to another and better báse-one feated before Washington, they vanquished of the most hazardous movements in war. the enemy on the rugged height of South The army of the Potomac, bolding its Mountain, pursued him to the hard-fought own safety and almost the safety of our field of Antietam, and drove him, broken cause, in its hands, was equal to the occa and disappointed, across the Potomac sion. The seven days are classical in sinto Virginia. American history; those days in which

The army had need of rest. Ater the the noble soldiers of the Union and Consti

terrible experiences of baitles and marches, tution fought an outnumbering enemy by • day, and retreated from successive victories

with scarcely an interval of repose, which by night, through a week of battle, closing

they had gone through from the time of the terrible series of conflicts with the w

| leaving for the Peninsula; the return to ever-memorable victory of Malvern, where

| Washington ; the defeat in Virginia ; the they drove back, beaten and shattered, the

victory at South Mountain, and again at entire eastern army of the confederacy,

| Antietam, it was not surprising that they and thus secured for themselves a place of

| were in a large degree destitute of the ab

solute necessaries to effective duty. Shoes rest and a point for a new advance upon the capital from the banks of the James.

were worn out; blankets were lost; clothRichmond was still within our grasp, had

ing was in rags; in short, the army was the army of the Potomac been re-enforced

unfit for active service, and an interval for and permitted to advance. But counsels,

rest and equipment was necessary. When which I cannot but think subsequent

the slowly forwarded supplies came to us

I led the army across the river, renovated, events proved'unwise, prevailed in Wash

refreshed, in good order and discipline, ington, and we were ordered to abandon

and followed the retreating foe to a posi. the campaign. Never did soldiers better descrve the thanks of a nation than the

tion where I was confident of decisive vic:

itory, when, in the midst of the movement, army of the Potomac for the decds of the l.

while my advance guard was actually in Peninsula campaign, and although that

' contact with the enemy, I was removed meed was withheld from them by the au-| thorities, I am persuaded they have re

from the command. (cived the applause of the American I am devoutly grateful to God that my people.

| last campaign with this brave army was 'The army of the Potomac was recalled crowned with a victory which saved the from within sight of Richmond, and incor- nation from the greatest peril it had then porated with the army of Virginia. The undergone. I have not accomplished my disappointments of the campaign on the purpose if, by this report, the army of the Peninsula had not damped their ardor nor Potomac is not placed high on the roll of diminished their patriotism. They fought the historic armies of the world. Its deeds well, faithfully, gallantly, under General cnoble the nation to which it belongs. Pope ; yet were compelled to fall back on Always ready for battle, always firin, Washington, defeated and almost demor- steadfast, and trustworthy, I never called alized.

on it in vain; nor will the nation ever have cause to attribute its want of suc- than their survivors to the justice of a cess, under myself, or under other com- nation's gratitude. manders, to any failure of patriotism or I am, sir, very respectfully, bravery in that noble body of American

Your obedient servant. soldiers.

G. B. MCCLELLAN, No man can justly charge upon any por

Major Gen. U.S. Army. tion of that army, from the commanding Brigadier Gen. L. THOMAS. general to the private, any lack of devo Adj. Gen. U. S. Army. tion to the service of the United States government, and to the cause of the Con

WAR DEPARTMENT, stitution and the Union. They have proved

Adj. General's Office, their fealty in much sorrow, suffering,

Washington, Dec. 22, 1863. danger, and through the very shadow of I certify that the above is a true copy death. Their comrades dead on all the of the original report on file in this office. fields where we fought have scarcely more

E. D. TOWNSEND, claim to the honor of a nation's reverence!

Assist. Adj. General.

INDEX.

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PAGR

.....18

FIRST PERIOD. Instructions to Gen. Banks.......... 45
Introductory Summary..................3

" Gen. Wadsworth..45-6
Memorandum of Operations........4-5

Official Note on the Plan of Cam-
Letter to the Secretary of War

paign ................................. 46
Strength of the Army of the Po-

| Blenker's Division ordered to Fre-

mont .................................47
tomac—Plans of Advance....... 6-8
Situation at Washington, July 1861..8

Troops left in front of Waslı'n..48–50
Organization of the Army.............9

Security of Washington..............51
Artillery .....................

10

Plans for the defence of Manassas...52
Organization of Divisions........ 11-

Military Incidents of the First

Period ...............................53
Wadsworth's Command.........
Dix's Command................
Engineers .................................18
" Topographical..............19

SECOND PERIOD.
Medical and other departments.. 20-23 Embarkation at Alexandria.......53-4
Occupation of Drainsville..............24 Arrival at Fort Monroe...............54
The Battle of Ball's Bluff.............25 Position and force of the Enemy...55
Coast Expeditions proposed...... 26–7 The Advance on Yorktown..........56
Burnside sent to North Carolina...27 McDowell's corps detached..........57
Instructions to Gen. Halleck.........28 Preparations for the Siege of

Gen. Buell............29 Yorktown .......... ..........58
Gen. Sherman........30 Letter from Gen. Keyes to Sena-

Gen. Butler...........31 tor Harris.......... ..........59-60
President's General War Order The President impatient-he urges
No. 1........... ..............31-2 haste .......

...............61
President's Special War Order | Gen. Barnard on the Fortifications
No. 1.................................32

.......32 of Yorktown.......... ......... 62-3
Peninsula Route proposed............32 Progress of the Siege ................ 64
Note from the President to Mc- Evacuation of Yorktown...............64

Clellan...............................32 Battle of Williamsburg............ 66-8
Letter from McClellan to the Scc Advance to White House............63

retary of War.................... 32–6 On the Chickahominy.. ............... 69
Vessels of transport.................36–7 Reinforcements requested........ 69-70
War Vessels on the Potomac........37 McDowell ordered to co-operate 70–71
Rebel obstructions on the Potomac..38 Instructions to McDowell............71
Notes explaining Operations......38–9 McDowell's Orders Suspended......73
President's General War Order Alarm at Washington about Banks 74
No. 3...............................

..............40 Preparations for the Attack on
Advance of the Army on Manas- I. Richmond ............................ 75
sas...........

...........40-1 Battle at Hanover Court House.... 76
Circular in relation to Spies, &c..41-2 Advance to the Seren Pines......... 78
Strength of the Rebel Army.........42 Battle at Fair Oaks..............73-81
President's Far Order No. 3........43 Condition of the Arr.y.............83-4
Preparations for the Peninsula Awaiting Reinforcement3............ 8+
Campaign ............................ 44 The affair at Redoulit No. 3.........88

(173)

PAGR.

PAGE
Battle of Mechanicsville.......... 90-94 | FOURTH PERIOD.
of Gaines' Mill..................95

The Situation at Washington......129
" Allen's Farm................. ...96

McClellan to Command the De-
" Savage's Station ............

fences ..............................129
Crossing White Oak Swamp......

Interview with the President......129
Battle of Nelson's Farm............98-9

Telegram to Gen. Porter............129
16 of Malvern Hill...............100

The Return of Pope..................130
Losses from June 26 to July 1.....102

The Defence of Washington........130
Retreat to Harrison's Bar...........102

The Movement into Maryland.....131
Halleck fearful and complaining...132

Gen. McClellan reaches Frederick.133
THIRD PERIOD,

Orders of the Enemy.................133

Situation at Harper's Ferry........134
Correspondence between General Instructions to Col. Miles...........135

McClellan and the Presi Movernents of Franklin's corps. 135-36

dent .............................. 103–4 Action at Burkettsville..............163
McClellan's view of the Situation.. 105 Surrender of Harper's Ferry.......137
Another call for Reinforcements...106 Battle at South Mountain......137-40
Occupation of Coggin's Point......107 The Advance to Antietam...... 141-42
The Enemy driven from Malvern The Battle of Antietam .........143-49

Hill .................................108 Retreat of the Enemy................150
Order for the Evacuation of Har- 1 Casualties at Antietam ..............151

rison's Bar ........................109 Estimated strength of Rebel army.152
Remonstrance of Gen. McClellan..111 Strength of McClellan's army.....152
Halleck's Rejoinder..............112-13 | The Enemy recross the Poto-
Preparations for Evacuation .,113–15 mac ...............
Halleck Impatient at Delay........116 Halleck finding fault...................152
Want of necessary Transports.....116 The Enemy at Martinsburg..........154
A Talk with Halleck by Tele Condition of the Army.................155

graph ........... ..........117 Rebel Raid into Maryland.........156
The Evacuation.........................118 McClellan ordered across the Poto-
The March to Fort Monroe.........119 mac ...........

..........157
McClellan asks a kind word for Correspondence in relation to
Army................................ 119

Army supplies................158–62
Embarkation at Fort Monroe......120 Plan of the Advance.................164
McClellan at A quia Creek..........121 Guard the Potomac...............165-6
Halleck alarmed about Pope....... 121 South of the Potomac.............166–7
McClellan arrives at Alexandria..121 The Army massed at Warren-
Preparations to aid Pope............122 ton ........... .... ......168-9
McClellan without authority to Gen. McClellan Relieved of the
Act ..........

...........123 Command..........................168
Apprehensions for the Safety of | Review of Events General Con-

the Capital ........ ......125-28 siderations .......... .........169-72

..........152

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