Ohio History, 第 8 卷

封面
 

大家的评论 - 撰写书评

我们没有找到任何书评。

其他版本 - 查看全部

常见术语和短语

热门引用章节

第424页 - ... whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute a new government, laying its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness.
第81页 - Maryland, being sick and weak in body but of sound and disposing mind memory and understanding...
第127页 - ... now we are engaged in a great civil war testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure we are met on a great battlefield of that war we have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live...
第469页 - The general boundary line, between the lands of the United States and the lands of the said Indian tribes, shall begin at the mouth of Cuyahoga river, and run thence, up the same, to the portage between that and the Tuscarawas branch of the Muskingum; thence, down that branch to the crossing place, above fort...
第408页 - I call therefore a complete and generous education, that which fits a man to perform justly, skilfully, and magnanimously all the offices, both private and public, of peace and war.
第414页 - Thou wilt not leave us in the dust: Thou madest man, he knows not why, — He thinks he was not made to die; And thou hast made him : thou art just.
第74页 - For just experience tells, in every soil, That those that think must govern those that toil; And all that freedom's highest aims can reach, Is but to lay proportion'd loads on each.
第48页 - He, unconscious whence the bliss. Feels, and owns in carols rude, That all the circling joys are his, Of dear vicissitude. From toil he wins his spirits light, From busy day the peaceful night ; Rich, from the very want of wealth, In heaven's best treasures, peace and health.
第83页 - Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife, Their sober wishes never learned to stray ; Along the cool sequestered vale of life They kept the noiseless tenor of their way.
第414页 - Thou seemest human and divine, The highest, holiest manhood, thou: Our wills are ours, we know not how; Our wills are ours, to make them thine.

书目信息