The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text of the Corrected Copy Left by the Late George Steevens, Esq. ; with Glossarial Notes, 第 8 卷

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第310页 - Julius bleed for justice' sake ? What villain touch'd his body, that did stab, And not for justice ? What, shall one of us, That struck the foremost man of all this world But for supporting robbers, shall we now Contaminate our fingers with base bribes, And sell the mighty space of our large honours For so much trash as may be grasped thus?
第301页 - What private griefs they have, alas, I know not, That made them do it; they are wise and honourable, And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you. 1 come not, friends, to steal away your hearts: I am no orator, as Brutus is; But (as you know me all) a plain blunt man, That love my friend; and that they know full well That gave me public leave to speak of him. For I have neither wit...
第313页 - O Cassius, you are yoked with a lamb That carries anger as the flint bears fire ; Who, much enforced, shows a hasty spark, And straight is cold again.
第312页 - I had rather coin my heart, And drop my blood for drachmas, than to wring From the hard hands of peasants their vile trash By any indirection. I did send To you for gold to pay my legions,. Which you denied me. Was that done like Cassius?
第298页 - Caesar lov'd you. You are not wood, you are not stones, but men ; And, being men, hearing the will of Caesar, It will inflame you, it will make you mad. 'Tis good you know not that you are his heirs ; For, if you should, O, what would come of it!
第249页 - Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world. Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves.
第297页 - Yet Brutus says, he was ambitious ; And Brutus is an honourable man. You all did see that on the Lupercal I thrice presented him a kingly crown, Which he did thrice refuse. Was this ambition? Yet Brutus says, he was ambitious ; And, sure, he is an honourable man. I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke, But here I am to speak what I do know. You all did love him once, not without cause ; What cause withholds you then to mourn for him...
第473页 - Give me my robe, put on my crown ; I have Immortal longings in me. Now no more The juice of Egypt's grape shall moist this lip. — Yare, yare, good Iras ; quick. — Methinks, I hear Antony call ; I see him rouse himself To praise my noble act ; I hear him mock The luck of Caesar, which the gods give men To excuse their after wrath.
第248页 - Did I the tired Caesar : And this man Is now become a god ; and Cassius is A wretched creature, and must bend his body, If Caesar carelessly but nod on him.
第264页 - Tis good. Go to the gate ; somebody knocks. [Exit Lucius. Since Cassius first did whet me against Caesar, I have not slept. Between the acting of a dreadful thing And the first motion, all the interim is Like a phantasma, or a hideous dream : The Genius, and the mortal instruments, Are then in council ; and the state of man, Like to a little kingdom, suffers then The nature of an insurrection.

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