College Life, Its Conditions and Problems: A Selection of Essays for Use in College Writing Courses

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Maurice Garland Fulton
Macmillan, 1914 - 524 頁
In this volume, intended primarily for use in English composition classes, the selections have been chosen chiefly from the writings of college presidents and other educators with a view to covering some of the more improtant questions and problems of the student's personal relation to the various aspects of college life -- intelectual, athletic, and social.
 

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第 108 頁 - For whosoever will save his life shall lose it : but whosoever will lose his life for my sake, the same shall save it. 25 For what is a man advantaged, if he gain the whole world, and lose himself, or be cast away?
第 407 頁 - Tell me where is fancy bred, Or in the heart or in the head? How begot, how nourished! Reply, reply. It is engendered in the eyes. With gazing fed ; and fancy dies In the cradle where it lies. Let us all ring fancy's knell : I'll begin it, — Ding, dong, bell.
第 160 頁 - Then again, do not tell me, as a good man did to-day, of my obligation to put all poor men in good situations. Are they my poor ? I tell thee thou foolish philanthropist that I grudge the dollar, the dime, the Cent I give to such men as do not belong to me and to whom I do not belong.
第 121 頁 - The idea of her life shall sweetly creep Into his study of imagination...
第 157 頁 - There is a time in every man's education when he arrives at the conviction that envy is ignorance ; that imitation is suicide ; that he must take himself for better, for worse, as his portion ; that though the wide universe is full of good, no kernel of nourishing corn can come to him but through his toil bestowed on that plot of ground which is given to him to till.
第 96 頁 - The civilized world is to be regarded as now being, for intellectual and spiritual purposes, one great confederation, bound to a joint action and working to a common result; and whose members have for their proper outfit a knowledge of Greek, Roman, and Eastern antiquity, and of one another. Special local and temporary advantages being put out of account, that modern nation will in the intellectual and spiritual sphere make most progress, which most thoroughly carries out this programme.
第 160 頁 - If an angry bigot assumes this bountiful cause of Abolition, and comes to me with his last news from Barbadoes, why should I not say to him, " Go love thy infant ; love thy wood-chopper : be good-natured and modest : have that grace ; and never varnish your hard, uncharitable ambition with this incredible tenderness for black folk a thousand miles off. Thy love afar is spite at home.
第 167 頁 - The inquiry leads us to that source, at once the essence of genius, of virtue, and of life, which we call Spontaneity or Instinct. We denote this primary wisdom as Intuition, whilst all later teachings are tuitions. In that deep force, the last fact behind which analysis cannot go, all things find their common origin.
第 104 頁 - the notions of the beginning and the end of the world entertained by our forefathers are no longer credible. It is very certain that the earth is not the chief body in the material universe, and that the world is not subordinated to man's use. It is even more certain that nature is the expression of a definite order, with which nothing interferes.
第 157 頁 - A man should learn to detect and watch that gleam of light which flashes across his mind from within, more than the lustre of the firmament of bards and sages.

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