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With something of hope and fear, I offer this work to my country. I have endeavoured to relate the chequered fortunes, delineate the character, and trace the works of the Illustrious Peasant with candour and accuracy: his farming speculations-excise schemes—political feelings and poetic musings—are discussed with a fulness not common to biography: and his sharp lampoons and personal sallies are alluded to with all possible tenderness to the living, and respect for the dead. In writing the Poet's life I have availed myself of his unpublished journals-private letters, manuscript verses, and of well-authenticated anecdotes and traits of character supplied by his friends; and I have arranged his works as much as might be in the order of their composition, and illustrated them with such notes, critical, historical and biographical, as seemed necessary. Of verse, one hundred and odd pieces will be found in this edition, which are not in Currie's octavos. The number of letters, too, is materially increased—but nothing is admitted which bears not the true Burns' stamp.

A. C.
BELGRAVE-PLACE,
January 1, 1834.

PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION.

When this Memoir and chronological Edition of the works of Burns were first announced, a friend observed that the learned part of the world, he was afraid, might think they had enough of the Peasant Poet already, and look coldly on any attempt to associate him in beauty of embellishment and elegance of exterior with bards

"Far seen in Greek, deep men of letters.” · My chief dread is," I replied, “that my labours in the cause of the Poet may not be acceptable : I have no fear for Burns-he will take care of himself.” It has not happened otherwise with the Poet than I anticipated: nor have my own exertions been, it appears, unwelcoine : six thousand copies of the Life have been disposed of, and a new edition is called for: I now give it to the world, with some of the errors in the first edition corrected, and all such new intelligence added as seemed useful and characteristic.

A. C.
BELGRAVE-PLACE,
September, 1835.

THE PASSAGES OF THE LIFE WITHIN BRACKETS ARE INCORPORATED FOR THE

FIRST TIME IN THIS EDITION.

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Life of Burns.

LIFE OF BURNS.

PAGE

His residence at Harvieston

62

PART I.-AYR-SHIRE.

Visit to a descendant of Robert Bruce

ib.

The fairest Maid of Devon Banks—Char-

His parentage

lotte Hamilton

63

Picture of his early days, by himself

Burns's third Highland Tour, in company

with Nicol

64

His secret school of study

His first love

5

His visit to Bannockburn

ib.

65

to the Duke of Athole, at Blair

[Narrative of his residence at Kirkoswald in

1777)

6

to Mrs. Rose, at Kilravock

67

His melancholy-Letter to his father . 10

to the Duke and Duchess of Gor-

Mrs. Stewart of Afton, his first patroness 13

don

68

Bachelors' Club, Tarbolton

17 (His return to Edinburgh] .

69

Old and New Light Factions

19 Dangerous accident

il.

Person and manners of the young Poet

His friendship with Clarinda

70

Sketches by Henry MoKenzie — David He contributes to Johnson's Musical Mu-

Sillar, and Professor Walker

22 seum

71

The maidens of Kyle

30 Jacobitism of Burns-His Ode to Prince

(His attachment to Jean Armour]

31

Charles.

73

35

First appearance of his Poems

ib.

Burns erects a monument to Fergusson

37

His friendship for Mrs. Dunlop

His connexion with Creech

74

75

Adventure at Ballochmyle-Miss Alexander 38

His appointment to the Excise

39

Dr. Blacklock-his encouraging letter

His Common - place Book Sketches of

Character

76

78

His return to Mauchline, and Marriage

PART II.-EDINBURGH.

Burns's first appearance there

40 PART III.-ELLISLAND.

(Description of his manners and conduct, by His appearance as a farmer in Nithsdale, in

Dugald Stewart]

41 1788

79

Testimony of Professor Walker

43 (State of his mind, described by himself 81

(Recollections of the Poet by John Richmond 44 His increasing cares

83

- by Sir Walter Scott] 45 [Domestic Sketch of the Poet, by Sir Eger-

Kindness of Henry MoKenzie

46

ton Brydges) ·

84

The beautiful Duchess of Gordon

47

Friars-Carse Hermitage

85

Anecdotes of the Poet, in Edinburgh

49 Picture of his mind and feelings, by himself 87

iLockhart's description of Burns among the [His favourite walk on the banks of the

Literati and Lawyers]

Nith]

88

[Burns's Border Tour, in company with

He establishes a Subscription Library. 89

Robert Ainslie)

53 Anecdotes while in the Excise

90

A love adventure

54 His Highland Mary

92

A jaunt to England

57 (His perambulations over the moors of Dum-

His return to Mossgiel in 1787

58 fries-shire)

93

His first Highland Tour

59

The story of the Whistle

96

An adventure

60 His adventure with Ramsay of Ochtertyre. ib.

Return to Mauchline

ib. The Earl of Buchan's invitation to Burns to
Renews his intercourse with Miss Armour ib.

visit Dryburgh
His second Highland excursion with Dr. (His final visit to Edinburgh-Anecdotes] . 100
Adair
6) He relinquishes his farm

. 10)

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ib.

LIFE OF BURNS.

Stanzas for the Anniversary of Burns, by

David Vedder

163

PART IV.--DUMFRIES.

His residence at the Bank-Vennel

102 | POEMS OF BURNS.

His engagement with George Thomson 103

Conduct of the Board of Excise towards

The Poems marked thus are not included in the

Burns

104

Eight-volume Edition.

His Nithside beauties

. 107

[His excursion with Syme of Galloway)

. 108

Preface to the First, or Kilmarnock, Edition 164

His dislike of epauletted puppies

. 115

Dedication to the Second, or Edinburgh,

Edition

165

Story of the sword-cane

116

The beautiful Maria Woodleigh

. 117

166

Winter, a Dirge

His removal to Mill-hole-Brae, in 1794 . 118

Death, and dying words, of Poor Mailie ib.

Death of Glendinning

Poor Mailie's Elegy

119

. 167

First Epistle to Davie, a brother poet . 168

Testimonials of Gray and Findlater re-

specting the Poet

120 (Davie's reply)

170

Visit of Professor Walker

. 121

Second Epistle to Davie

. 171

Illness of the Poet

ib. Address to the De'il .

172

His residence at Brow

122 [Explanatory notes by Thomas Landseer ib.

Affecting Interview with Mrs. Riddel 123 [The De’il's answer, by Lapraik)

174

His letter to Erskine of Mar

The Auld Farmer's salutation to his auld

His return from Brow in a dying state ib. mare, Maggie

175

ib.

Address to a Haggis

Melancholy spectacle of his household

. 176

Death of Burnshis Funeral

126

A Winter Night

177

(His personal character, by a Lady) . 127

The Jolly Beggars

179

His personal strength and conversation . 130

Tune : Soldier's joy

180

Anecdotes of Burns

132

Soldier laddie

181

His character as a Poet

. 135

Auld Sir Simon

['The excellence of Burns, by Thos. Carlyle] 138

O an ye were dead, guidman ib.

[The widow, children, and brother of the

Whistle o'er the lave o't

182

Poet)

142

Clout the cau'dron

ib.

Sale of his household effects (note)

143

For a' that, an' a'that .

183

Jolly mortals, fill your glasses

ib.

APPENDIX.

Death and Dr. Hornbook

185

Rules and Regulations of the Bachelors'

The Kirk's Alarm. A satire

· 187

Club

145 The Twa Herds, or the Holy Tulzie . . 190

[Letter of Gilbert Burns on Education) 146 Holy Willie's Prayer

192

[The last three years of the Poet's life, by Epitaph on Holy Willie

193

Mr. Gray)

149

The Inventory. In answer to a mandate by

[Phrenological developement of Burns) 151 the surveyor of taxes

194

[Poem addressed to Burns, by Mr. Telford] 154

Adam A-m's prayer

195

Poem on the Death of Burns, by William The Holy Fair.

ib.

Roscoe

156

(Letter from a blacksmith to the ministers

Ode to his Memory, by Campbell

157

and elders of the church of Scotland]

. 199

Address to the Sons of Burns, by Words- The Ordination .

200

worth

158

The Calf. To the Rev. James Steven . 202

Lines to a friend, by Coleridge

ib.

(Reply to Burns's Calf, by an Unco Calf] ib.

[On Burns's Anniversary, by James Mont-

Epistle to James Smith

203

gomery]

ib.

The Vision. Duan first

159

. 205

(Robin's Awa! by the Ettrick Shepherd]

The Vision. Duan second

• 206

On his Anniversary, by Hugh Ainslie . ib.

Hallowe'en

• 208

Verses to his Memory by Halleck

160

Man was made to mourn. A Dirge

213

by Andrew Mercer

161

. 214

(The Life and Age of Man]

ib.

On his Anniversary, by Mrs. Richardson

Epistle to John Goudie, Kilmarnock 215

To the Memory of Burns, by Edward

Rushton

162

Epistle to John Lapraik, an old Scottish bard ib.

Sonnet to the Shade of Burns, by Charlotte

* There's naething like the honest nappy . 216

Smith

163 (Lapraik's reply to Burns's Epistle

217

Verses to his Memory, by T. II., Dunfermline il Second Epistle of Burns to Lapraik

218

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PAGE

Epistle to William Simpson, Ochiltree

. 219

Postscript.

• 220

Third Epistle to John Lapraik

221

Epistle to the Rev. John M‘Math

222

Verses to a Mouse, on turning her up in

her nest with the plough

223

Scotch Drink

224

The Author's earnest Cry and Prayer to the

Scotch representatives in the House of

Commons

226

Postscript

228

Address to the Unco Guid, or the Rigidly

Righteous

ib.

Tam Samson's Elegy .

230

Epitaph.- Per Contra

ib.

The Lament, occasioned by the unfortunate

issue of a friend's amour.

Despondency. An Ode

. 232

The Cotter's Saturday Night

. 233

(Lines by Mrs. Hemans)

234

The First Psalm

. 236

[The ancient version]

ib.

The first six verses of the Ninetieth Psalm. 237

[The ancient version]

ib.

Ode to Ruin

ib.

A Prayer under the pressure of violent

anguish.

238

A Prayer in the prospect of death

ib.

Stanzas on the same occasion

'id.

Stanzas to a Mountain Daisy on turning one

down with the plough

239

Epistle to a young friend (Andrew Aiken] 240

Verses to a Louse, on seeing one on a lady's

honnet at church

241

Epistle to John Rankine

242

* Verses to the same, on his writing to the

Poet, that a girl in that part of the coun-

try was with child by him

243

*The Poet's welcome to his illegitimate child ib.

Verses on a Scotch Bard, gone to the West

Indies.

244

*Verses written under violent grief

245

The Farewell

A Dedication to Gavin Hamilton, Esq. 246

Elegy on the Death of Robert Ruisseaux 247

Epistle to James Tait, of Glenconner.

248

Stanzas on the birth of a Posthumous Child 249

Lines to Miss Cruikshanks, a very young

lady, written on the blank leaf of a book ib.

Verses to Willie Chalmers .

250

A Prayer, left at a Reverend Friend's house 251

Epistle to Gavin Hamilton, Esq., recom-

mending a boy

ib.

Epistle to Mr. M*Adam, of Craigengillan 252

* Nature's Law, a Poem, humbly inscribed

to Gavin Hamilton, Esq.

Answer to a Poetical Epistle, sent to the

Author by a Tailor

253

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[Epistle from a Tailor (Thomas Walker,

Ochiltree) to Robert Burns]

253

Lines written on a Bank note

254

A Dream

ib.

A Bard's Epitaph

256

* Remorse, a Fragment

ib.

The Twa Dogs, a Tale

. 257

*Address to the Owl

260

Address to Edinburgh

. 261

Lines on meeting with Lord Daer

Epistle to Major Logan

. 263

The Brigs of Ayr, a Dialogue

. 264

Verses to an old Sweetheart after her mar-

riage

267

Elegy on the Death of Robert Dundas, of

Arniston, Esq., late Lord President of the

Court of Session

ib.

Verses on the Death of John M.Leod, Esq. ib.

Verses to Miss Logan, with Beattie's

Poems

. 268

The American War, a Fragment

ib.

The Dean of Faculty, a new Ballad 269

* Additional Stanza

Verses to Clarinda with a present of a pair

of drinking glasses .

270

Verses to the same, on the Poet's leaving

Edinburgh

ib.

to the same (I burn, I burn, &c.) . 271

to the same (Before I saw Clarinda's

face)

Verses written under the Portrait of Fergus-

son, the Poet

ib.

Prologue spoken by Mr. Woods on his Be-
nefit night

ib.

Epistle to the Guidwife of Wauchope

House

272

[The Guidwife of Wauchope House to Ro-

bert Burns)

273

Epistle to William Creech, written at Sel-

kirk

ib.

* The Hermit, written on a marble Sideboard

in the Hermitage belonging to the Duke

of Athole, in the Wood of Aberfeldy. 275

The Humble Petition of Bruar Water to

the Noble Duke of Athole

ib.

Lines on scaring some Water-fowl in Loch-

Turit, a wild scene among the Hills of

Ochtertyre

276

Lines written in the Parlour of the Inn at

Kenmore, Taymouth

277

Lines written while standing by the Fall of

Fyers, near Loch-Ness

ib.

Poetical Address to Mr. William Tytler,

with the Bard's Picture

278

Lines written in Friars'-Carse Hermitage,

on the Banks of Nith. First Version ib.

-Second Version

279

Extempore Lines to Captain Riddel, of

Glenriddel, on returning a Newspaper 280

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