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SIEGENDORF.

As far

As you feel, nothing, but all life for her.
young-all-beautiful-adores you-is
Endowed with qualities to give happiness,
Such as rounds common life into a dream
Of something which your pocts cannot paint,
And if it were not wisdom to love virtue)
For which philosophy might barter wisdom;
And giving so much happiness, deserves
A little in return. I would not have her

Break her heart for a man who has none to break,
Or wither on her stalk like some pale rose
Deserted by the bird she thought a nightingale,
According to the Orient tale. She is-

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Count, 't is a marriage of your making,
So be it of your wooing; but to please you
I will now pay my duty to my mother,
With whom, you know, the lady Ida is-
What would you have? You have forbid my stirring
For manly sports beyond the castle walls,

And I obey; you bid me turn a chamberer,
To pick up gloves, and faus, and knitting-needles,
Aud list to songs and tunes, and watch for smiles,
And smile at pretty prattle, and look into

The

eyes of feminie, as though they were The stars receding early to our wish

Upon the dawn of a world-winning battleWhat can a son or man do more?

[Exit ULRIC.

Too much!

SIEGENDORF (Solus).

Too much of duty and too little love!
He pays me in the coin he owes me not:
For such hath been my wayward fate, I could not
Fulfil a parent's duties by his side

Till now; but love he owes me, for my thoughts
Ne'er left him, nor my eyes long'd without tears
To see my child again, and now I have found him!
But how! obedient, but with coldness; duteous
In my sight, but with carelessness; mysterious,
Abstracted-distant-much given to long absence,
And where-uone know-in league with the most riotous
Of our young nobles; though, to do him justice,
He never stoops down to their vulgar pleasures;
Yet there's some tie between them which I cannot

Unravel. They look up to him-consult himThrong round him as a leader: but with me He hath no confidence! Ah! can I hope it After-what! doth my father's curse descend Even to my child? Or is the Hungarian near To shed more blood, or-oh! if it should be! Spirit of Stralenheim, dost thou walk these walls To wither him and his-who, though they slew not, Unlatch'd the door of death for thee? "T was not Our fault, nor is our sin: thou wert our foe, And yet I spared thee when my own destruction Slept with thee, to awake with thine awakening! And only took-accursed gold! thou liest ! Like poison in my hands; I dare not use thee, Nor part from thee; thou camest in such a guise, Methinks thou wouldst contaminate all hands Like mine. Yet I have done, to atone for thee, Thou villanous gold! and thy dead master's doom, Though he died not by me or mine, as much As if he were my brother! I have ta'en His orphan Ida-cherish'd her as one Who will be mine.

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Forgive this man. I loathed him to the last, As he did me. I do not love him now, But-

PRIOR ALBERT.

Best of all! for this is pure religion! You fain would rescue him you hate from hellAn evangelical compassion!-with Your own gold too!

SIEGENDORF.

Father, 't is not my gold.

PRIOR ALBERT.

Whose then? you said it was no legacy.

SIEGENDORF.

No matter whose-of this be sure, that he
Who own'd it never more will need it, save
In that which it may purchase from your altars:
'T is yours, or theirs.

PRIOR ALBERT.

Is there no blood upon it?

SIEGENDORF.

No: but there's worse than blood-eternal shame!

PRIOR ALBERT.

Did he who own'd it die in his bed?

[SIEGENDORF offers the gold which he had taken He did. from STRALENHEIM.

PRIOR ALBERT.

Count, if I

Receive it, 't is because I know too well Refusal would offend you. Be assured

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Son! you relapse into revenge,

If you regret your enemy's bloodless death.

SIEGENDORF.

His death was fathomlessly deep in blood.

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Died, I scarce know-but-he was stabb'd i' the dark, large and magnificent Gothic Hall in the Castle of And now you have it—perish'd on his pillow

By a cut-throat!—ay!—you may

look upon me!

I am not the man. I'll meet your eye on that point, As I can one day God's.

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Siegendorf, decorated with Trophies, Banners, and Arms of that Family.

Enter ARNHEIM and MEISTER, Attendants of COUNT SIEGENDORF.

ARNHEIM.

Be quick! the count will soon return: the ladies

| Already are at the portal. Have you sent The messengers in search of him he seeks for?

MEISTER.

I have, in all directions, over Prague,
As far as the man's dress and figure could
By your description track him. The devil take
These revels and processions! All the pleasure
(If such there be) must fall to the spectators.
I'm sure none doth to us who make the show.
ARNHEIM.

Go to! my lady countess comes.

MEISTER.

I'd rather

Ride a day's hunting on an outworn jade, Than follow in the train of a great man In these dull pageantries.

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The truth, and nought but truth, if not the whole:
Yet say I am not guilty! for the blood

Of this man weighs on me, as if I shed it,
Though by the power who abhorreth human blood,

I did not!-nay, once spared it, when I might
And could-ay, perhaps, should-(if our self-safety
Be e'er excusable in such defences

Against the attacks of over-potent foes);
my house;

But pray for him, for me, and all

For, as I said, though I be innocent,

I know not why, a like remorse is on me

As if he had fallen by me or mine. Pray for me, Father! I have pray'd myself in vain.

PRIOR ALBERT.

I will.

Be comforted! You are innocent, and should Be calm as innocence.

SIEGENDORF.

But calmness is not

Always the attribute of innocence:

I feel it is not.

PRIOR ALBERT.

But it will be so,

When the mind gathers up its truth within it.
Remember the great festival to-morrow,
In which you rank amidst our chiefest nobles,
As well as your brave son; and smoothe your aspect;
Nor in the general orison of thanks

For bloodshed stopt, let blood, you shed not, rise
A cloud upon your thoughts. This were to be
Too sensitive. Take comfort, and forget
Such things, and leave remorse unto the guilty.

ARNHEIM.

Be gone! and rail

[Exeunt.

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The banners, and the nobles, and the knights,
The gems, the robes, the plumes, the happy faces,
The coursers, and the incense, and the sun
Streaming through the stain'd windows, even the tombs,
Which look'd so calm, and the celestial hymns,
Which seem'd as if they rather came from heaven
Than mounted there. The bursting organ's peal
Rolling on high like an harmonious thunder;
The white robes, and the lifted the world
At peace! and all at peace with one another!
Oh, my sweet mother!

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[Exeunt.

Who love each other so entirely? You,
The count, and Ulric, and your daughter, Ida.

Poor child!

JOSEPHINE.

IDA.

Do you pity me?

1

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How so?

ULRIC.

Your wish is granted

SIEGENDORF.

I have seen the murderer. ULRIC.

A cloud comes o'er his blue eyes suddenly,

Yet he says nothing.

JOSEPHINE.

It is nothing: all men,

Especially in these dark troublous times,

Have much to think of.

Whom? Where?

SIEGENDORF.

The Hungarian, who slew Stralenheim.

ULRIC.

You dream.

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Through my fast tears, though they were thick and My destinies were woven in that name:

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When we reach'd the Muldau's bridge,
The joyous crowd above, the numberless
Barks mann'd with revellers in their best garbs,
Which shot along the glancing tide below,
The decorated street, the long array,
The clashing music, and the thundering.
Of far artillery, which seem'd to bid

A long and loud farewell to its great doings,
The standards o'er me, and the tramplings round,
The roar of rushing thousands, all--all could not
Chase this man from my mind; although my senses
No longer held him palpable.

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Much; for I

Unless

Had almost then forgot him in my son,
When just as the artillery ceased, and paused
The music, and the crowd embraced in lieu
Of shouting, I heard in a deep, low voice,
Distinct and keener far upon my ear

Than the late cannon's volume, this word-«Werner!»

Utter'd by-

ULRIC.

SIEGENDORF.

HIM! I turn'd-and saw-and fell.

ULRIC.

And wherefore? Were you seen?

SIEGENDORF.

The officious care Of those around me dragg'd me from the spot, Seeing my faintness, ignorant of the cause; You, too, were too remote in the procession The old nobles being divided from their children) To aid me.

ULRIC.

But I'll aid you now.

SIEGENDORF.

You shall do so

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