The Volsunga saga, 第 10 卷

封面
 

讀者評論 - 撰寫評論

我們找不到任何評論。

其他版本 - 查看全部

常見字詞

熱門章節

第 130 頁 - Then spake Brynhild, Budli's daughter — " May the woman lack Both love and children, Who gained greeting For thee, O Gudrun ! Who gave thee this morning Many words ! " Then spake Gullrond, Giuki's daughter — " Hold peace of such words Thou hated of all folk ! The bane of brave men Hast thou been ever, All waves of ill Wash over thy mind, To seven great kings Hast thou been a sore sorrow, And the death of good will To wives and women.
第 67 頁 - go we and drive them to the river which is called Busil-tarn." They did so, and drave the horses down into the deeps of the river, and all swam back to land but one horse ; and that horse Sigurd chose for himself ; grey he was of hue, and young of years, great of growth, and fair to look on, nor had any man yet crossed his back. Then spake the grey-beard, " From Sleipnir's kin is this horse come, and he must be nourished heedfully, for it will be the best of all horses ; " and therewithal he vanished...
第 78 頁 - Sigurd neither trembled nor was adrad at the roaring of him. So whenas the worm crept over the pits, Sigurd thrust his sword under his left shoulder, so that it sank in up to the hilts, then up leapt Sigurd from the pit and drew the sword back again unto him, and therewith was his arm all bloody, up to the very shoulder. Now when that mighty worm was ware that he had his...
第 104 頁 - Now fare these folk wide over the world, and do many great deeds, and slay many kings' sons, and no man has ever done such works of prowess as did they ; then home they come again with much wealth won in war. Sigurd gave of the serpent's heart to Gudrun, and she ate thereof, and became greater-hearted, and wiser than ere before: and the son of these twain was called Sigmund. Now on a time went Grimhild to Gunnar her son, and spake — " Fair blooms the life and fortune of thee, but for one thing...
第 78 頁 - I am called a noble beast : neither father have I nor mother, and all alone have I fared hither." Said Fafnir, " Whereas thou hast neither father nor mother, of what wonder wert thou born then ? But now, though thou tellest me not thy name on this my deathday, yet thou knowest verily that thou liest unto me." He answered, " Sigurd am I called, and my father was Sigmund.
第 146 頁 - King Atli arrayed his host for battle, and the ranks were so set forth that a certain wall there was betwixt them and the brethren. " Welcome hither," said he. " Deliver unto me that plenteous gold which is mine of right ; even the wealth which Sigurd once owned and which is now Gudrun's of right." Gunnar answered, " Never gettest thou that wealth ; and men of might must thou meet here, or ever we lay by life if thou wilt deal with us in battle : ah, belike thou settest forth this feast like a great...
第 113 頁 - Heed it not ! for never again seest thou me glad in thine hall, never drinking, never at the chessplay, never speaking the words of kindness, never overlaying the fair cloths with gold, never giving thee good counsel; — ah, my sorrow of heart that I might not get Sigurd to me ! " Then she sat up and smote her needlework, and rent it asunder, and bade set open her bower doors, that far away might the wailings of her sorrow be heard; then great mourning and lamentation there was, so that folk heard...
第 122 頁 - Now hath come to pass the soothsaying of Brynhild ; an ill work not to be atoned for." And Gudrun said, " My kinsmen have slain my husband ; but ye, when ye next ride to the war and are come into the battle, then shall ye look about and see that Sigurd is neither on the right hand nor the left, and ye shall know that he was your good-hap and your strength ; and if he had lived and had sons, then should ye have been strengthened by his offspring and his kin.
第 143 頁 - Some great storm will befall, whereas thou hadst a white bear in thy mind." "An erne methought came in," she says, "and swept adown the hall, and drenched me and all of us with blood. and ill shall that betoken, for methought it was the double of King Atli.
第 27 頁 - As to the literary quality of this work we might say much, but we think we may well trust the reader of poetic insight to break through whatever entanglement of strange manners or unused element may at first trouble him, and to meet the nature and beauty with which it is filled : we cannot doubt that such a reader will be intensely touched by finding, amidst all its wildness and remoteness, such startling realism, such subtilty, such close sympathy with all the passions that may move himself to-day....

書目資訊