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WASHINGTON, January 11, 1849. DEAR SIR: As far as I have been able to ascertain, the two instruments mentioned in the enclosed letter of General Totten were purchased for the use of the Ohio and Michigan boundary, in 1835, but, the appropriation having been expended under the War Dapartment, the instruments may be considered as belonging to that department. They are both of great value, and one of them, the zenith telescope, was used by me on the northeastern boundary. It will appear, by the letter of General Totten, they are now both required in the department to which they belong. I have the honor to be, with great regard, your obedient servant,

W. H. EMORY. Hon. JAMES BUCHANAN,

Secretary of State.

NEW YORK, February 4, 1849. SIR: In compliance with instructions of the Department of State, Jannary 19, 1849, I have the honor to report, that I have received from Major J. V. Graham such instruments as were deemed “ necessary for correctly running and marking the boundary line” between the United States and Mexico. Two invoices—one dated New York, January 29, 1849, the other dated Boston, February 1, 1849-exhibit the character and condition of these instruments, and are herewith enclosed.

I have been compelled to adopt, in a great measure, Major Graham's report of the condition of the instruments, as it would take more time than Í am allowed to set up each instrument and examine it in detail.

The character of the higher class of astronomical instruments, such as the Troughton & Semmes telescope, the transit, and the altitude and azimuth instrument, though admirably adapted for service on the northeastern boundary, intersected, as that boundary was at many points, by the great thoroughfares of travel, are, in consequence of their size, unsuited for general use on the Mexican boundary, and can only be used at or near points accessible by sea-San Diego and the mouth of the Del Norte. At these points, however, they can be profitably used.

The repacking such of the instruments as required it, and were of convenient size to carry into the interior on the backs of animals, was completed yesterday: many of these could have been rendered still more portable by placing the different parts of the same instrument in different boxes; but this is a nice operation, involving the skill of the best instrument makers, and would take one or two months to complete; it has, therefore, not been attempted.

The region in which we operate being destitute of trees of sufficient size to afford stands for the instruments, I have ordered castings to be made for portable stands. I have also ordered the observing tents put in condition for service. Both the castings and the fixtures for the tenis will be completed in the course of the week.

I now proceed, in further pursuance of your instructions, to “report what other instruments” are deemed necessary for the survey, together with their probable cost, and where they may be obtained the most speedily and upon the best terms.

Instruments.

Price.

Where to be obtained.

do

1 pocket chronometer

$200 W. C. Bond, Boston. 1 box chronometer

285
Do

do 2 heliotropes, at $100

200 E. & G. W. Blunt, New York. 2 reconnoitring glasses, at $50 100

Do

do 1 portable astronomical telescope 190

Do

do 4 Nautical Almanacs, 1849

10
Do

do
4
do
1850

10
Do

do I copy Catalogue Stars, Br. Ass'n

20
Do

do 1 set of charts, coast of California 2

Do 1 Daniels's hygrometer

15
Do

do 4 Hassler's Logarithms, at $1

4
Do

do 6 thermometers, each $4

24
Do

do
2 artificial horizons, at $20, (with
boxes for mercury)

40
Do

do 6 observing lamps

15
Do

do 1 36-inch transit

400 Troughton & Semmes, London. 1 36-inch zenith telescope

700
Do

do 4 cases drawing instruments,at $10 40 E. & G. W. Blunt, New York. 4 bottles of ether (sulphuric.)

bushel plaster of Paris. 2 observing tents, at $40

SO

Mr Bond has one by Park & Frodsham, No. 648, of tried excellence.

1 equatorial stand, price estimated at $100. If an arrangement could be made by which the use can be obtained of the transit and the zenith telescopes mentioned in my letter to you of the 11th January last, the two corresponding instruments estimated for in the above list, respectively at 400 and 700 dollars, would not be needed.

These instruments are now at the store of Messrs. E. & G. W. Blunt, New York, awaiting transportation to West Point. The object of sending these instruments there being for the purposes of instruction, as stated in General Totten's letter enclosed in mine of the 11th, I would propose, if no other means could be adopted, to place these instruments at the disposal of the State Department, (where they have been for many years,) to exchange for them the large and valuable altitude and azimuth instrument, by Troughton & Semmes. This is one of the best instruments of the kind in the country, and combines all the parts of both the other instruments; but, unfortunately, it is too large for use on the Mexican boundary. The instrument referred to is the first named on the invoice herewith sent.

A letter received from the Hon. John B. Weller, commissioner, &c., re quests that all the instruments intended to go overland may be sent to New Orleans before the 23d.

I return herewith the list of instruments furnished me from the records of the Department of State. I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

W. H. EMORY, Bt. Major U. S. Army. Hon. James BUCHANAN, Secretary of State.

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missioner. It may be proper, however, to inform you that, being charged, in addition to my other duties, with the command of the military escort intended to protect the commission, I will make the attempt to reach San Diego in tine to report the escort in readiness as soon as the commission assembles, so that no delay will happen from that cause. I have the honor to be your obedient servant,

W. H. EMORY,

Breret Major United States Army, foc. Hon. SECRETARY OF STATE.

STEAMSHIP FALCON,

At Sea, March 26, 1849. Sır: Up to the last moment before leaving New Orleans, I waited with anxious expectation a despatch from your department; bút, receiving none, I finally sailed, early on the morning of the 21st instant, for Chagres, which latter port we expect to reach in all to-morrow.

At Panama I hope to join the commissioner, and to proceed with him to San Diego. I should have waited till hearing from you; but, finding that little reliance is to be placed in ihe present system of conducting telegraphic communications, and fearing lest no other favorable opportunity would again occur in some time for me to proceed on my mission, I deemed it advisable to take the responsibility of at once embarking. I hope it will have met with your approval, and that of the President.

I forward a few papers, which I had withdrawn for the purpose of making copies, and which I beg leave to ask may be filed for reference in your de partment. They are the originals. I have the honor to remain; very faithfully, your obedient servant,

ANDREW B. GRAY, United States Surveyor under treaty with Mexico. Hon. J. M. CLAYTON,

Secretary of State, Washington city.

PANAMA, May 9, 1849: Str: The enclosed package, addressed to Mr. Wm. Cranch Bond, diTector of the observatory at Cainbridge, contains a series of astronomical and other observations, intended for review by the A. academy of Boston. These observations, and the objects in sending them to the academy, being connected directly with the service on the boundary, with which I have been honored by the Department of State, induces me to request that they may be forwarded under the frank of the departmend.. I have the honor to be your obedient servant,

W. H. EMORY,
Brevet Major United States Ariny, Chief As'rmomer and

Tipographicul Engineer Mexican boundary survey.Hon. J. M. CLAYTON,

Secretary of State.

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