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PROCLAMATION.

To the people of California.

The undersigned has the pleasure to announce the ratification of a treaty of peace and friendship between the United States of America and the Mexican republic, by which Upper California is ceded to the United States.

The boundary separating this country from Lower California "consists of a straight line drawn from the middle of the Rio Gila, where it unites with the Colorado, to a point on the coast of the Pacific ocean distant one marine league due south of the southernmost point of the port of San Diego."

By the conditions of this treaty, those residing within the limits of this territory thus ceded, who may wish to become citizens of the United States, are absolved from all further allegiance to the Mexican republic, and will at the proper time to be judged of by the Congress of the United States) be incorporated into the Union, and admitted to the enjoyment of all rights and privileges granted by the constitution to American citizens. Those who wish to retain the character of Mexicans will be at liberty to do so, and also to retain their property in this territory, or to dispose of it and remove the proceeds thereof wherever they please; but they inust make their election within one year from the 30th day of May last, and those who remain after the expiration of that year without declaring their intentions to retain such character will be considered to have elected to become citizens of the United States. In the mean time they will be protected in the free enjoyment of their liberty and property, and secured in the free exercise of their religion. They, however, are reminded that, as war no longer exists, and as Upper California now belongs to the United States, they owe a strict obedience to the American authorities, and any attempt on their part to disturb the peace and tranquillity of the country will subject them to the severest penalties.

The undersigned has received instructions from Washington to take proper measures for the permanent occupation of the newly acquired territory. The Congress of the United States (to whom alone this power belongs) will soon confer upon the people of this country the constitutional rights of citizens of the United States; and, no doubt, in a few short months we shall have a regularly organized territorial government: indeed, there is every reason to believe that Congress has already passed the act, and that a civil government is now on its way to this country, to replace that which has been organized under the rights of conquest. Such territorial government will establish all local claims and regulations which, within the scope of its legitimate powers, it may deem necessary for the public welfare. In the mean time the present civil officers of the country will continue in the exercise of their functions as heretofore, and when vacancies exist or may occur, they will be filled by regular elections held by the people of the several towns and districts, due notice of such elections being previously given. The existing laws of the country will necessarily continue in force till others are made to supply their place. From this new order of things there will result to California a new destiny. Instead of revolutions and insurrections, there will be internal tranquillity; instead of a fickle and vacillating policy, there will be a firm and stable government, administering justice with impartiality, and punishing crime with the strong arm of power. The arts and sciences will flourish, and the labor of the agriculturist, guided by the lamp of learning, will stimulate the earth to the most bountiful production. Commerce, freed from the absurd restrictions formerly imposed, will be greatly extended; the choked up channels of trade will be opened, and the poisoned fountains of domestic faction forever dried up. Americans and Californians will now be one and the same people, subject to the same laws, and enjoying the same rights and privileges; they should therefore become a band of brothers, emulating each other in their exertions to develop the wealth and resources, and to secure the peace, happiness, and permanent prosperity of their common country. Done at Monterey, California, this seventh day of August.

R. B. MASON, Colonel 1st Dragoons, Governor of California.

STATE DEPARTMENT OF THE TERRITORY OF CALIFORNIA,

Monterey, August 7, 1848. Sir: In reply to your letter of July 30, I am directed to inform you that no authority has been granted to exempt vessels “landing lumber" from the regular tonnage duty. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Lieutenant of Engineers, and Secretary of State. Colonel J. D. STEVENSON,

Commanding, fc., Los Angeles, California.

STATE DEPARTMENT OF THE TERRITORY OF CALIFORNIA,

Monterey, August 7, 1848. Sir: Colonel Mason directs that the moneys collected from the citizens of Santa Barbara as a military contribution, imposed for the disappearance and concealment at that place of a gun belonging to the brig Elizabeth, will be turned over to the first alcalde of Santa Barbara, to be held by him as a municipal fund, and used for the purchase or erection of a prison, &c., as was suggested to the alcalde in a former communication from this office.

The alcalde will receipt to you for this money, and be held accountable that it is properly expended for the purpose designated. You will show him this letter. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

: H. W. HALLECK, Licutenant of Engineers, and Secretary of State.' , Captain F. J. LIPPETT,

Commanding, Sc., Santa Barbara, California.

STATE DEPARTMENT OF THE TERRITORY OF CALIFORNIA,

Monterey, August 9, 1848. Sır: You will receive by the same express which brings you this, a notification of the ratification of a treaty of peace, by which Upper Cali. fornia is ceded to the United States. Colonel Mason directs that you will continue to perform the duties of collector of the port of San Francisco until further orders. You will hire such assistance as may be required for the performance of these duties, and pay for it out of the proceeds of the customs. The tariff of duties for the collection of military contributions will immediately cease, and the revenue laws and tariff of the United States will be substituted in its place. You will also, in making out your accounts, observe, as far as you may be able, the forms used in the custom-house and Treasury Department of the United States. No more gold dust will be received in payment or in pledge of payment of duties; the revenue must be collected in the same currency as in any other port of the United States. You will be relieved from these duties as soon as a successor can be appointed. Will you recommend some suitable citizen who will accept the office? As the duties of collector will be far less ardu. ous than formerly, it is thought that a salary of about — dollars will be sufficient. Bonds must be given by the collector for the sum of ten or fifteen thousand dollars. It is supposed that you will be able to procure a copy of the present tariff of the United States from some of the merchants of San Francisco. If not, one will be sent you from this place. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Lieutenant of Engineers, and Secretary of Slate. Captain J. L. Folsom,

Collector, fic., San Francisco, California.

STATE DEPARTMENT OF THE TERRITORY OF CALIFORNIA,

Monterey, July 26, 1848. Sar: Your letter of the 16th instant is received, and the governor has accepted your resignation of the office of 1st alcalde of the jurisdiction of San José. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Lieutenant of Engineers, and Secretary of State. Charles White,

First Alcalde, San José, Califurnia.

Know all men by these presents, that I, Richard B. Mason, colonel first regiment dragoons United States army, and governor of California, by virtue of authority in me vested, do hereby appoint William Byrne first alcalde for and in the jurisdiction of the Pueblo de San José, Upper Cali

fornia.

Given at Monterey, the capital of California, this 26th day of July, A. D. 1848, and the 73d year of the independence of the United States.

R. B. MASON, Colonel 1st Dragoons, Governor of California.

STATE DEPARTMENT TERRITORY OF CALIFORNIA,'

Monterey, August 7, 1848. Sir: It is reported that the first alcalde of the district of San Francisco has removed from the district, and that the office is now vacant. Unless that officer has returned and resumed his duties, you will give due notice of an election to supply his vacancy, as is directed in the governor's proclamation of this date. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Lieutenant of Engineers, and Secretary of State. W. J. LEAVENWORTH, .

Second Alcalde, San Francisco.

State DEPARTMENT TERRITORY OF CALIFORNIA,

· Monterey, August 7, 1848. Sir: The governor directs that you will give due notice for the election of four subordinate alcaldes of the Sacramento district. That district will be considered as including the whole country west and northwest of the district of Sonoma. It is suggested that these subordinate alcaldes be located at or near four most prominent places in the district. They will have concurrent jurisdiction, but will all be subordinate to the first alcalde of the district. You will please to report to this office the names of the persons so elected. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Lieutenant of Engineers, and Secretary of State. John SINCLAIR,

First Alcalde, Sacramen'o district, California. . .

pretty long as well not to me release the pur district

State DEPARTMENT TERRITORY OF CALIFORNIA,

Monterey, August 12, 1848. Sir: I am directed by the governor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of June 12, and to inform you that his answer has been delayed on account of the absence of Mr. Hartnell, the government translator from Monterey. As it appears that the Indian Geronimo has already suffered a pretty long imprisonment for his offence, the governor is of opinion that it would be as well not to prosecute the matter any further. If you are also of that opinion, you will release the prisoner.

The several subordinate alcaldes of your district have concurrent jurisdictions among themselves, but are all subordinate to the first alcalde, and must conform to his decisions. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Lieutenant of Engineers, and Secretary of State. Don Juan BONDINI,

First Alcalde, San Diego district.

STATE DEPARTMENT TERRITORY OF CALIFORNIA,

Monterey, August 14, 1848. Sir: I am directed to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of June 12, complaining of the judicial conduct of Alcalde Colton, Monterey, and asking for the interference of the governor. Such interference is now unnecessary, inasmuch as peace exists between the United States and the republic of Mexico; and the proper courts will now be established in this country, to which all matters of litigation can be referred., Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Lieutenant of Engineers, and Secretary of State. To Don GREGORIO DE AJURIA.

STATE DEPARTMENT TERRITORY OF CALIFORNIA,

. Monterey, August 14, 1848. Sır: In reply to your letter of July 31, I am directed to say to you that, as Upper California will now become a Territory of the United States, with a regularly-organized territorial government, of course the standard weights and measures of the United States will become the legal weights and measures of this country. I

Whether Congress has yet organized such government, or whether the Treasury Department has yet forwarded to this country such standard weights and measures, it is not now possible to say; but the presumption is, that both the government and the weights are by this time on their way to California.

Gold is always bought and sold by troy weight.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

Lieutenant of Engineers, and aecretary of Slale. R. SEMPLE, Esq., Benicia.

STATE DEPARTMENT TERRITORY OF CALIFORNIA,

Monterey, August 14, 1848. Sir: I am directed by Governor Mason to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of July 3, enclosing the protest and papers of Jules Chanons. As the penalty for non-verified invoices was imposed by the custom-house officers, under an order of the President of the United States, the governor does not consider himself authorized to remit it. With reference to the claims for surplus duties imposed on brandy in the port of San Francisco, it appears from the enclosed custom-house papers that no such duties were imposed, and that the claim is entirely unfounded. . I have the honor, sir, to be, with high respect, your obedient servant,

6. W. HALLECK,

Lieutenant of Engineers, and Secretary of State. Mr. J. S. MOERENHOUT,

Consul oj France.

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