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HEADQUARTERS TENTH MILITARY DEPARTMENT,

Monterey, California, July 26, 1848. Sir: I enclose you a letter from Robert Clift to myself of the 14th of June, which I found here on my late return from the gold mines.

From the copy of Mr. Canfield's quarterly acconnt current for the first quarter of the present year, it appears that he turned over to Robert Clift $560, and from Pedrorena's account rendered up to the 4th of November, 1847, (see my letter to Lieutenant Clift of the 8th of March last-copy herewith,) he received from Pedrorena, together with $348 121 on account of Fitche's note, $1,397 12-making in all $1,957 12. Mr. Clift made no reply to my several letters calling on him for a rendition of his customhouse accounts. I wish you to ask him why he never replied to them, particularly to the one of the 8th of March. I wish you to get such a settlement out of him as you can. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. B. MÁSON,

Colonel 1st Drugoons, commanding. Lieutenant DAVIDSON,

A. A. Quartermaster, Los Angeles, California.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH MILITARY DEPARTMENT,

Monterey, California, July 25, 1849. Whereas many citizens have gone to the gold mines of the Sacramento without making proper provisions for the families they have left behind them, and whereas many soldiers, tempted by the flattering prospects of sudden wealth, have deserted their colors to go to the same region, regardless of their oaths and obligations to the government, endangering the safety of the garrisons and thereby the tranquillity of the cou:try, it is made known that unless families are guarded and provided for by their natural protectors, and unless citizens lend their aid to prevent desertions from the garrisons of the country, the military force now in California will be concentrated in the gold region to the exclusion of all unlicensed persons. Persons employed at the mines are reminded that up to this time they have enjoyed the high privilege of digging gold on government land without charge or without hindrance; in return for this privilege they are bound to assist in appprehending deserters, and in giving notice to the nearest military officer where any are concealed. A dragoon force will soon be at the inining district, and will traverse it in every direction to arrest deserters from the army and navy, and to apprehend such citizens as employ or harbor them, for these citizens are as culpable as the deserters themselves, and if arrested will be tried by a military commission and punished according to the laws of war. Should the officer in command of this force receive the cordial aid and support of the citizens, he will be enabled to check the serious evil which now threatens the safety of the country; but if citizens are not willing to lend their aid and assistance, but one alternative remains, that of taking military possession of the mining district.

It is hoped that there are enough of reflecting men at the mines to see how much the prosperity of California will be retarded, unless they pur

sue the course that is pointed out to them. It is desirable to develop the riches and wealth of California; but the military safety of the country must be secured at all hazards.

R. B. MASON, Colonel 1st Dragoons, Governor of California.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH MILITARY DEPARTMENT,

Monterey, California, July 28, 1848. Str: In reply to your letter of the 20th of June, I have to say that I have sought for the Mexican laws on the subject of usury, and can find nothing on the subject except what is found in Febreno Mexicana, vol. 3, page 273, to which I refer you. I learn from the best business and mercantile men, and old inhabitants, that custom, for the last ten or fifteen years, has established the rate of interest at 12 per centum per annum, or agreement to the contrary, and that for the same period the custom has been, both among the mercantile and all other classes, to pay and receive greater rates of interest that may have been agreed upon between the contracting parties, and which was expressed in writing, either in the shape of contract, bond, or note. Long custom would therefore seem to have established interest at the above named rates. I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. B. MASON, Colonel 1st Dragoons, Governor of California. W. D. M. HOWARD,

San Francisco, California.

HeaDQUARTERI TENTU MILITARY DEPARTMENT,

Monterey, California, July 28, 1848. GENTLÉMEN: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of yesterday's date. Under the circumstances you mention, and which are so well known to me—the almost entire absence of gold and silver coin-I have no hesitation in saying, that if the California grain gold, now in such abundant quantities in the country, can be wrought into convenient shapes, so as to answer as a substitute for gold and silver coin, I will order it to be received at the custom house, in payment of duties, at its intrinsic value. I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. B. MASON, Colonel 1st Dragoons, Governor of California. TO WALTER COLTON, TALBOT H. GREEN, J. S. Ruckle, Thomas 0.

LARKIN, C. WOOSTER, MILTON LITTLE, D. SPENCER, JOSE ABRIGO.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH MILITARY DEPARTMENT,

Monterey, California, July 28, 1848. SIR: Your letter of the 18th instant has been duly received, together with its enclosures, asking my advice and authority in reference to a bond

and mortgage on a valuable landed property, belonging to the estate of the late Mr. Leidesdorff.

I would certainly advise the paying off of the debt at once, and thereby stop the interest and relieve the property from the mortgage, if it is certain the estate will be able to pay all of its creditors; but if there be not assets sufficient, then they must receive a pro rata amount, and this they could not do if the debt in question be paid in full now. Other and older cred. itors, perhaps to a larger amount, might be prejudiced thereby. As soon as I can get the laws, now being printed in San Francisco, a court will be organized for that district, if I can find a suitable person for the judge, having jurisdiction to all that relates of administrators and the settlement of the estates of deceased persons. 1 am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. B. MASON, Colonel 1st Dragoons, Governor of California. W. D. M. HOWARD,

San Francisco, California.

STATE DEPARTMENT OF THE TERRITORY OF CALIFORNIA,

Monterey, California, July 28, 1848. Sir: I am directed to ask your explanation of the matter referred to in the enclosed extract from a protest of Jules Chavon, captain of the Adelaide, at the same time calling your attention to the second modification in the Secretary of the Treasury's letter of June 10th, 1847. (Vide Bibby's pamphlet, page 1.) Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Lieut. of Engineers, and Secretary of State. Captain J. L. Folsom,

Collector, San Francisco, California.

STATE DEPARTMENT OF THE TERRITORY OF CALIFORNIA,

Monterey, July 29, 1848. Sir: I am directed by the governor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 25th instant, and to say, in reply to your inquiries, that if the governor's instructions relative to inventories and appraisements, in the administration of the estate of the late H. A. Leidesdorff, have not been executed by the first alcalde, it will be your duty, in his absence, to see that these instructions are fully carried out. Herewith are enclosed the papers which accompanied your letter. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Lieut. of Engineers, and Secretary of State. H. W. LEAVENWORTH,

Second Alcalde, San Francisco, California.

Know all men by these presents, that I, Richard B. Mason, colonel Ist dragoons United States army, and governor of California, by virtue of authority in me vested, do hereby appoint Charles V. Gillespie notary public in and for the district of San Francisco.

Done at Monterey, the capital of California, this 29th day of July, A. D. 1848, and the 73d year of the independence of the United States.

R. B. MASON, Colonel Ist Dragoons, Governor of California.

STATE DEPARTMENT OF THE TERRITORY OF CALIFORNIA,

Monterey, July 29, 1818, . Sir: I have the honor to enclose herewith your appointment of notary public in and for the district of San Francisco. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Lieutenant of Engineers, and Secretary of State. C. V. GILLESPIE,

San Francisco, California.

Custom-honse and port regulations for the harbors of California. In the absence of the commander-in-chief of the Pacific squadron, the undersigned, in virtue of authority in him vested, orders and establishes the following regulations for the police of the harbors of California, and for the better enforcement of the orders of the President of the United States respecting the collection of military contributions:

1. The collector shall visit all merchant vessels immediately on their arrival, and make the master of each vessel acquainted with such regulations as may be established from time to time for the police of the harbor.

2. Any disputes which may arise between the masters of merchant vessels in relation to anchorage or moorings shall be decided by the collector.

3. If the master of any merchant vessel shall refuse or fail to obey the directions of the collector as to the anchorage or mooring of his vessel, he shall be fined not exceeding thirty dollars, or imprisoned not exceeding one week, for each offence.

4. If any master of a merchant vessel shall receive, or connive at being received on board his vessel, any deserter from the army or navy, or if such deserter shall be found concealed on board his vessel, the vessel itself shall be confiscated, and the master shall be tried by a military commission, and punished according to the laws of war.

5. If any person belonging to a merchant vessel, other than the master, shall receive, or connive' at being received on board, any deserter from the army or navy, such person shall be tried by a military commission, and punished according to the laws of war.

6. Any person who shall entice any sailor or other person belonging to any vessel on the coast of California to desert, or who'shall aid or abet in such desertion, or who shall knowingly receive or conceal, or assist in concealing such deserter, shall, on conviction before any judge, alcalde, or other civil magistrate, who may be authorized to issue warrants or try

of a port.

cases, be subject to a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars, and im prisonment not exceeding sixty days.

7. If any master of a vessel shall be detected in landing, or attempting to land anywhere in California, any goods or merchandise without permit from a collector, he shall be fined for every such offence in the sum of five hundred dollars, and the goods or merchandise so landed, or attempted to be landed, and the boat or boats through which such landing is effected or attempted, shall be seized, forfeited, and sold by the nearest collector.

8. 'If any person or persons other than the master of a vessel shall be detected in landing, or attempting to land anywhere in California, any goods or merchandise without permit from a collector, he or they shall be fined in the sum of one hundred dollars, and the goods or merchandise so landed, or attempted to be landed, and the boat or boats through which such' landing is effected or attempted shall be seized, forfeited, and sold by the nearest collector.

9. In case goods or merchandise are landed or attempted, without permit from a collector, at a point distant from any port of entry, it shall be the duty of the nearest alcalde or other civil magistrate to seize, confiscate, and sell such goods and boats, and impose the penalties designated in the two preceding articles, in the same manner as is directed for the collector

10. On the arrival of any vessel whose cargo is subject to duty, the collector will notify the nearest commanding military officer, who, on receiving such notice, will immediately detail one or more non-commissioned officers or privates as a guard for such vessel. This guard will be instructed to allow no cask, box, package, or other article of merchandise to be removed from the vessel without a permit signed by the collector. These permits will be returned from day to day by the guard to the colo lector, for file in the custom-house.

11. Masters of vessels will be responsible for the conduct of their men while on shore or at liberty, and will be held accountable for the payment of any fines or forfeitures'imposed on them for violations of law, or riotous or improper conduct.

12. The collectors will require the masters of all vessels when clearing at the custom-house to make oath to the correctness of their manifests, and that to the best of their knowledge and belief no gold or silver is on board, or about to be exported in their vessel, other than that set forth in their manifest.

13. All shippers and supercargoes will be required to make oath that their invoices and papers set forth truly and correctly the amount of all goods, merchandise, or other property shipped on board the vessel about to be cleared. A similar oath may, at the option of the collector, be administered to any passenger or other person about to sail in such vessel. All baggage belonging to passengers will be examined at the customhouse before it is suffered to go on board, and the keys thereof be withheld until the custom-house guard is withdrawn from the vessel.

14. All gold and silver not mentioned in the manifest, and found on board of any vessel about clearing from port in California, or concealed in passengers' baggage, or otherwise secreted for the purpose of defraud. ing the revenue, will be seized and confiscated, together with the box, trunk, or package, and all the contents of the same in which it may be

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