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rope, and part of India, with more ease than one can pay in Upper and Lower California. Such is the difficulty of communication, Major Rich left this port on the 22d of October last to make a payment at La Paz, and did not return until the 29th of March. He was fortunate in getting back so soon, as the general probability was that he would have to return via the Sandwich islands. I have the honor to be your obedient servant,

R. B. MASON,

Colonel 1st Dragoons, commanding.. ADJUTANT GENERAL U. S. ARMY,

Washington city, D. C.

[Extract.]

SAN FRANCISCO, February 13, 1848. SIR: Your Excellency will, I hope, not deem it improper for me to remark that it will be difficult in the extreme to obtain the required number of volunteers, without having first paid them for their former services. I have been fully conversant with their views and determinations upon the subject ever since they were disbanded. Should public notice be given them to appear at a stated time and place for the purpose of being regularly mustered into and out of service, in order that they may receive the pay allowed them by law, there is no doubt but that all of the young men and many of the married men would receive their legal pay and re-enlist. This they would have done last spring, had the matter been properly explained to them; but they were assured by Colonel Fremont that if they accepted their legal pay, it would be a virtual relinquishment of all claims for further pay. It would be a great inducement for them to re-enlist if this proposition should be extended to those only who are willing to re-enter the service. Should they also be informed that the facts in reference to their re-enlisting should be fully represented at home, and that they would be just as likely to receive extra pay for their latter as for their former services, this would also afford an additional inducenient.

I have the honor to be your Excellency's most obedient and humble servant,

.

L. W. HASTINGS. His Excellency R. B. Mason

. Governor of California.

True extract from Mr. Hastings's letter on file in this office.

W. G. SHERMAN, 1st Lieutenant 3d Artillery, A, A. A. Gencral MONTEREY, California, April 17, 1848.

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- HEADQUARTERS TENTH MILITARY DEPARTMENT, .

Monterey, California, April 15, 1848. • SIR : I herewith forward to you Captain Folsom's accounts of the military contribution fund, collected and disbursed in the port of San Fran. cisco for the 2d, 3d, and 4th quarters of 1847, and for the 1st quarter of 1848 ; the accounts of Captain Marcy and myself for the 4th quarter of 1847, and the 1st quarter of 1848, collected and disbursed in Monterey, (my own for the 4th quarter of 1847 has already been forwarded;) the accounts of Lieutenant Davidson and Mr. Alexander for the 4th quarter of 1847, collected at San Pedro and disbursed at Los Angeles by Lieut. Davidson. I never have been able to get from the Mormon volunteer officer at San Diego any return at all of the military contribution fund collected at that port. But very little, however, has been received there. Not much comrnerce in that place. The paymaster has been instructed to withhold the officer's pay until he settles up,

I also enclose the accounts from San José and La Paz, Lower California. I beg leave to call your attention to that part of Lieutenant Colonel Burton's letter of the 14th of January (copy herewith enclosed) relating to the coasting trade. Pretty much the same thing exists here that he represents in Lower California, but not to the same extent, but sufficiently so to render it a matter of serious inconvenience and com.plaint on the part of the people along the coast, who cannot get their produce taken from port to port, the foreign vessels being excluded from the coasting trade, and the American vessels being too few in number. This state of things compels the people sometimes to pay as high as five dollars freight per barrel for sending the product of their vineyards a few hundred miles along the coast. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. B MASON,

Colonel 1st Dragoons, commanding. Hon. SECRETARY OF War,"

Washington city, United States.

sting tradee i 4th ofttention to

La Paz, LOWER CALIFORNIA,

· January 14, 1848. Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith the accounts of the collectors of La Paz and San José, Lower California, for the second and third quarters of 1847, and the accounts of the late collector of La Paz for part of the fourth quarter 1847; also my accounts with the civil government for the third and fourth quarters 1847. No accounts from the port of San José have been received, the disturbance in the country preventing it. The accounts for the second and third quarters 1847 from San José are in conformity to the first forms received from Monterey.

I request further instructions respecting the coasting trade in the Gulf of California. It has been carried on heretofore by small vessels and launches owned in the country. There are no American vessels to take their places; and if the instructions lately received are en forced, there will be no trade, and the American government will be a curse rather than a blessing to the country. The circumstances are such, that permission ' has been given to carry on this trade in the usual manner until further instructions can be received.'

Surgeon Perry is now discharging the duties of collector for this port, and Lieutenant Haywood, United States navy, those of the port of San José.

In a commercial point of view, San José is a more important place than La Paz. It is near to Cape St. Lucas, and frequently visited by whale ships and other vessels bound to the Mexican coast. It has no harbor, and in some seasons of the year it is impossible to land upon its beach. La Paz is too far distant from the track of foreign vessels trading with the Mexican ports to enjoy the full advantages of its fine harbor. In time La Paz may be of some importance as a port of deposite and exchange, and is by far the best location for the capital of this country. I am, sir, with much respect, your obedient servant, ,

HENRY. S. BURTON,

Lieutenant Colonel New York. Volunteers. His Excellency Col. R. B. MASON,

U. S. Army, Governor of the Californias.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH MILITARY DEPARTMENT,

. Monterey, California, January 28, 1848. SIR: From intelligence received here yesterday from Commodore Shubrick, commanding the United States naval forces off Mazatlan-a copy of his communication is enclosed herewith—I deem it of the utmost importance to raise a corps of one thousand men to send to Lower California and Mazatlan, as early as practicable. I shall, therefore, despatch an officer-Major Hardie, of the army—to confer with your Excellency, and, if possible, to raise in Oregon an infantry battalion of four companies to be mustered into the service of the United States, to serve during the war, unless sooner discharged; or if it be impracticable to engage them for that period, then to engage them for twelve months from the time of being mustered into service, unless sooner discharged. The battalion will consist of

Field and staff.-1 major; 1 adjutant-a lieutenant of one of the companies, but not in addition.

Non-commissioned staff.1 sergeant major; 1 quartermaster's sergeant.
Four companies, each of which to consist of .
1 eaptain;
1 first lieutenant;
2 second lieutenants;
4 sergeants;
4 corporals;
2 musicians; and
100 privates.

Should the number of privates, on being mustered, not fall below sixtyfour effective men in a company, it will be received.

In the United States the volunteer officers are appointed and commissioned in accordance with the laws of the States from whence they are taken: the officers from Oregon will therefore, of course, be appointed pursuant to the laws of Oregon, if there are any on that subject; and if not, in such manner as your Excellency may direct; in which case I would respectfully suggest that the company officers be elected by their respective companies, and that the major be appointed by yourself; and I would further respectfully suggest the extreme importance to the public service that the officers be judiciously selected. .

The place of rendezvous for the several companies, as fast as they shall be organized, is necessarily left to yourself and Major Hardie.

The battalion will be inspected and mustered into service by Major Hardie, of the United States army, who will in every case be instructed to receive no man who is in years apparently over forty-five, or under eighteen, or who is not of physical strength and vigor. To this end the inspector will be accompanied by a medical gentleman, and the volunteers will be submitted to his examination. It is respectfully suggested that public notice of these requirements will prevent much disappointment to the zealous and patriotic citizens of Oregon who may be disposed to volunteer.

It may be proper to remark, that the law provides for the clothing (in. money) and subsistence of the non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates of volunteers who are received into the service of the United States.

In respect to clothing, the law requires that the volunteers shall furnish their own clothing, for which purpose it allows to each non-commissioned officer, musician, and private three dollars and fifty cents per month during the time he shall be in the service of the United States. In order that the volunteers who shall be mustered into service under this requi. sition may be enabled to provide themselves with good and sufficient clothing, the commutation allowance for six months (twenty-one dollars) will be allowed to each non-commissioned officer, musician, and private, after being mustered into service, but only with the express condition that the volunteer has already furnished himself with six months' clothing—this fact to be certified to the paymaster by the captain of the company—or that the amount thus advanced shall be applied, under the supervision of his captain, to the object contemplated by law. In this latter case the advance commutation for clothing will be paid on the captain's certificate that he is satisfied it will be so applicd. .

In respect to subsistence before arriving at the place of rendezvous, and for travelling home from the place of discharge, the allowance is fifty cents for every twenty miles distance.

The volunteers from Oregon will be discharged in California; or if they prefer it, they will be transported at the public expense back to the place of rendezvous.

I do not know how this call for volunteers will be met in Oregon, but I flatter myself with the assurance that it will receive the cordial support of your Excellency; and I am certain it will show that the citizens of Oregon have lost no patriotism by crossing the mountains, and that they will be equally prompt in coming to their country's standard as their brethren in the United States: .. I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. B. MASON, Colonel 1st Dragoons, Governor of California. To his Excellency GEORGE ABERNETHY,

Governor of Oregon.

HEADQUARTERS TENTH MILITARY DEPARTMENT,

Monterey, California, January 28, 1848. Sir: From intelligence received here yesterday from Commodore Shubrick, who took Mazatlan on the 11th of November, it becomes of the greatest importance to send him a land force as early as practicable to enable the United States to hold that port and the ports of La Paz and San José, in Lower California, when the burricane months (which commence in May) will oblige the fleet to leave that coast. Without the aid of this land force, the commodore writes that the United States flag at San José and Mazatlan will be hauled down. I am sure I can appeal with safety to the patriotism of the citizens of the United States in California to avert so unfortunate an occurrence.

I propose to raise in California an infantry battalion of at least three companies, with the least possible delay, and send them to the relief of our forces to the south.

The extracts from acts of Congress herewith enclosed, fully set forth the pay and allowances authorized by law; from which it will be seen distinctly what the law allows, and consequently any promise in the way of pay, &c. made by any one beyond that cannot be fulfilled. I am thus particular in order to prevent any expectation being created which cannot bę realized, and which will result in disappointment.

I am desirous that the battalion should be engaged to serve during the war unless sooner discharged. If it cannot be engaged for that period, then for twelve months from the date of being mustered into service, unless sooner discharged. The companies to compose this battalion wilt ren. dezvous at the Presidio barracks, San Francisco, as soon as each one is raised, there to be mustered into service, armed and equipped, and sent off by sea to the south. .

The companies will be inspected and mustered into service by an officer of the United States army, who will be instructed in every case to receive no man who is in years apparently over forty-five or under eighteen, or who is not of physical strength and vigor. To this end the inspector will be accompanied by a medical officer of the army, and the volunteers will be submitted to his examination. It is respectfully suggested that public notice of these requirements will prevent much disappointment to the zealous and patriotic citizens who may be disposed to volunteer.

The companies to elect their own officers. The major to command the battalion will be appointed by myself.

The foregoing gives you my views and wishes, and puts you in possession of the facts which render it of the utmost importance to the interests of the United States that a corps of one thousand men should be promptly organized for service in the south. May I then call on you to raise a company of infantry, and bring it as early as practicable into service? I am sure that, under this pressing necessity, you will cordially undertake to raise a company, and that neither my appeal to your own patriotism, nor that of our countrymen, will be unavailing. I shall send as soon as practicable an officer to Oregon with a view of raising a battalion there, as also one to the Mormon settlement at the Great Salt Lake, where I have every reason to expect success.

I command the means to pay in cash all expenses authorized by law, without contracting debts on account of the government, so that the patriotic citizens of the United States, in this country, who come to its stand

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