網頁圖片
PDF
ePub 版

On a Man who hired People to make Verses for him

On an ugly Woman

On Prometheus drawn by a bad Painter, by Mr. Cowley 60

On a bad Writer, by Mr. Prior

ibid
ibid.

On a reasonable Affliction, by Mr. Prior

On the erecting of a Monument to the Memory of Mr.
Butler, by Mr. Weftley

6i

On an Epigram

ibid.

ibid.

On Apollo and Daphne, by Mr. Smart
PRECEPTS for the EPITAPH, with Occafional Re-
61 to 69.

62

marks, from

Epitaph on Orpheus

On Mary Countess Dowa. of Pembroke, by Ben Johnson 63

On a beautiful and virtuous Lady, by the fame

On Mr. Gay, by Mr. Pope

ibid.

ibid.

On Dr. Francis Atterbury, Bp. of Rochefter, by Mr. Pope 64

On Mafter----who died of a lingering Illness, by Mr.

ibid.

ibid.

[ocr errors]

Smart

On Mr. Prior, written by himself

On one who would not be buried in Weftminster-Abbey,

Reflection on Midnight

153

Defcription of a deep Snow in which a Husbandman was

loft

ibid.

Reflections on the Wants and Miseries of Mankind 154

Winter compared to old Age, with fuitable Reflections 155

PRECEPTS for DIDACTIC or PRECEPTIVE POETRY,
with occafional Remarks

156 to 2

Of the Nature and State of Man with respect to the

Univerfe

ibid.

That Happiness depends upon our Ignorance of future
Events, and the hope of a future State
159
The folly of craving for Perfections which Providence

has denied us

160

The madness of Man's defiring to be other than what he is

161

Abfolute Submiffion due to Providence

ibid.

Of the Nature and State of Man with refpect to himself as an individual

ibid.
162

Of Self-love, and Reason, with their use
Of the Paffions, and their ufe

163, 164 Of the Nature and State of Man with refpect to Society 165 That no Creature fubfifts wholly for itfelf, nor wholly for another, the happiness of Animals therefore is mutual 165 Reafon inftructed by Instinct in inventing of Arts, and in forming Societies 166 The true end of Government, and the ufe of Self-love to Society 167 Of the Nature and State of Man, with respect to Happiness ibid. Happiness balanced among Mankind by the two Paffions of Hope and Fear

168

ibid.

But that good Men have the Advantage Eternal Goods are fo far from being the Rewards of Virtue that they are often destructive of it That Virtue only conftitutes Happiness Of the Universe, a Poem, by Mr. Baker Of Virgil's Georgics

170

173

The Prodigies fuppofed to have preceded the death of Cafar

The manner of grafting Trees
Of tranfplanting Trees

A beautiful defcription of Italy
'The Pleafures of Rural Life

169 ibid.

Of Gay's Rural Sports

of Angling
Of Setting
Of Shooting
Of Hunting

177

ibid.

Of training upCalves to the Yoke, and breaking of Horfes 178 Defcription of a War Horse

180

ibid.

Defcription of a Diftemper among the Cattle
The Nature and Government of Bees

182

185

ibid.

Of Gay's Trivia, or Art of walking the Streets
The Rife of the Patten, a Fable
The Rife of the Shoe-blacking Trade
Description of Frost-Fair on the Thames

174

175

176

187

188

189

190

ibid.

192

195

That a Critic fhould study his own Abilities
Nature the best Guide to the Judgement
But the Judgement may be improved by Art, and by study-
ing the Ancients, especially Homer and Virgil
Of the Licences allowed in Poetry

ibid.

198

199

200

Pride and imperfect Learning the fource of Error
Of judging of a Performance by a Part of it
Of being pleafed with glittering Thoughts only
Of judging only from the Language of a Piece, or from

ibid.

ibid.

201

197 ibid.

the Numbers

Of being too hard to please, or too apt to admire
Of judging partially, and collecting Opinions from others202
Wit is ever purfued with Envy, but the true Critic will
temper his Mind with good Nature

203

Characters of an incorrigable Poet, an impertinent Critic and a good one

An Admonition to the Critics

Of Dr. Armstrong's Art of preferving Health
Invocation to the Goddefs of Health

Of Air, and particularly of that breathed in London
Of the benefit of burning Pit-coal

204

205

206

207

ibid.

ibid.

208

Of the choice of Air, and of a Country Situation
Difeafes arifing from a Situation too marfhy or too dry ibid.
Of the force of Custom, and the friendly Power of native
Air

210

The neceffity of a free Circulation of Air, and of draining Bogs, and clearing away Trees ibid. Of the regard which ought to be paid to Diet and Exercise, by those who live in Countries that are very dry or very marthy ibid. Advice to those who would avoid an over moift Air 211 That gratifying the Fancy contributes to Health The Effect which running Water has on the Air The benefit of funny Situations, with a House rather airy than warm, proved from the languishing state Plants are in when confined to the Shade

212

ibid.

ibid.

of Diet

213

Of the Circulation of the Blood, its wafte, and how fuly'd ibid.

Of the ufe of Labour in concocting the Food into Chyle and then into Blood ibid.

Of the choice of Food; liquid Food, Vegetables, and young Animals, eafieft of Digeftion; but not thofe made fat by unnatural means ibid.

Every Brute is directed by Instinct to its proper Aliment, but voluptuous Man feeds with all the Commoners of Nature, and is led in purfuit of Pleasure to his own Deftruction. Eating to excefs, of any Aliment, dangerous, and especially after long Abstinence

214

215

The use of fometimes indulging the Appetite, and of Fasting occafionally to unload the Wheels of Life 216 The Regimen to be obferved in the feveral Seafons of the Year. That each Month and each Clime produces the Food which is moft proper, but Winter demands more generous Liquors than the other Seafons ibid.

217

Of the Choice and proper ufe of Water The only Liquors drank in the first Ages of the World ibid. That which is moft pure, which is fooneft evaporated, and which generally falls from the Sides of Mountains, or rifes from a fandy Spring is beft

218

itid.

Of fermented Liquors, and their use. When drank unmixed with Water they retard Concoction, as appears by their Property of preferving Reptiles, and animal Food from Putrefaction ibid. That Generous Liquors may fometimes be drank freely and to good purpose, tho' but feldom ; for whatever too much accelerates the motion of the Fluids, whether it be Wine, high seafon'd Meats, or laborious Exercife long continued, impairs the Conftitution ibid. Of Exercise

[ocr errors]

219

220

The Importance of Exercise to those of a delicate Frame ib.
The Pleafures of a rural Life and Converfation
That the Fancy is to be indulged in our choice of Exercise,
fince it is this only which diftinguishes Exercife from
Labour

221

ibid.

222

That in all our Exercifes we should begin and end leisurely; avoiding the ufe of cold Liquors while we are hot, and taking care to cool by degrees Of Bathing, and of the ufe of the Cold Bath (to fortify the Body against inclement Weather) to thofe whofe Con. ftitutions will admit of it The warm Bath recommended to thofe who dwell in fultry climes, and fometimes to the Inhabitants of our own, when the Skin is parched, the Pores obftructed, and Perfpiration imperfectly performed ibid. The Seafons for Exercife fhould be adapted to the Conftitution. Labour, when fafting, is beft for the corpulent Frame; but thofe of a lean habit should defer it until a Meal has been digefted ibid. No Labour either of Body or Mind is to be admitted when the Stomach is full, and the Spirits are required to promote Digeftion; for it is dangerous to hurry an half concocted Chyle into the Blood ibid. The corpulent Frame requires much Exercife, the lean lefs ibid.

No Labours are too hard in the Winter; but in the Summer milder Exercises are beft, and those are moft proper in the Morning and Evening, avoiding the noxious Dews

of the Night

222

« 上一頁繼續 »