The Subaltern ...

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W. Blackwood and Sons, 1872 - 368 頁

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第 45 頁 - ... to a personal trial of the river and he found it, as he expected to find it, fordable at low water, immediately opposite to the smaller breach. By this ford he accordingly crossed, the water reaching somewhat above his waist. Nor was he contented with having ascertained this fact ; he clambered up the face of the breach at midnight, gained its summit, and looked down upon the town. How he contrived to elude the vigilance of the French sentinels, I know not; but that he did elude them, and that...
第 47 頁 - ... enabled distinctly to perceive the preparations which were making for their reception. There was, therefore, something not only interesting but novel, in beholding the muzzles of the enemy's cannon, from the castle and other batteries, turned in...
第 48 頁 - It would be difficult to convey to the mind of an ordinary reader anything like a correct notion of the state of feeling, which takes possession of a man waiting for the commencement of a battle. In the first place, time appears to move upon leaden wings; every minute seems an hour, and every hour a day. Then there is a strange commingling of levity and seriousness within him — a levity which prompts him to laugh, he scarce knows why ; and a seriousness which urges him ever and anon to lift up...
第 50 頁 - ... pressed on. The opposite bank was soon gained, and the short space between the landing-place and the foot of the breach rapidly cleared, without a single shot having been returned by the assailants. But here the most alarming prospect awaited them.
第 52 頁 - I have ever heard before or since, whilst a bright flash, instantly succeeded by a smoke so dense as to obscure all vision, produced an effect upon those who witnessed it, such as no powers of language are adequate to describe. Such, indeed, was the effect of the whole occurrence, that for perhaps half a minute after not a shot was fired on either side. Both parties stood still to gaze upon the havoc which had been produced ! in.
第 108 頁 - I had ridden towards the front one morning, for the purpose of visiting a friend in the 5th division, when I learned, that three men had been seized a few days before, half-way between the two chains of posts, and that one of them had confessed that their intention was to desert. A court-martial was immediately ordered ; the prisoners were condemned to be shot ; and this was the day on which the sentence was to be carried into execution. I consequently found the division, on my arrival, getting under...
第 153 頁 - ... of all the huntsmen were of the best breed, or of the gayest appearance ; but what was wanting in individual splendour, was made up by the number of Nimrods ; nor would it be easy to discover a field more fruitful in laughable occurrences, which no man more heartily enjoyed than the gallant Marquis himself. When the hounds were out...
第 85 頁 - ... human beings. These, from their dress and abject appearance, struck me as being some of the inhabitants who had survived the assault. They looked wild and haggard, and moved about here and there, poking among the ruins, as if they were either in search of the bodies of their slaughtered relatives, or hoped to find some little remnant of their property. I remarked, that two or three of them carried bags over their arms, into which they thrust every trifling article of copper or iron which came...
第 111 頁 - ... their very breaths seemed to be repressed. It was altogether a most harrowing moment. The eyes of the prisoners being now tied up, the guard was withdrawn from around them, and took post about ten yards in their front. As soon as this was done, the same staffofficer who had read the proceedings of the trial, calling to the informer by name, ordered him to rise, for that the commander of the forces had attended to the recommendation of his judges, and spared his life. But the poor wretch paid...
第 45 頁 - So passed the night of the 30th, a night of deep anxiety to many, and of high excitement to all ; and many a will was made, as soldiers make their wills, before morning. About an hour before day, the troops were, as usual under arms, and then the final orders were given for the assault. The division was to enter the trenches about ten o'clock, in what is called light marching order ; that is, leaving their knapsacks, blankets, &c., behind, and carrying with them only their arms and ammunition ; and...

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