網頁圖片
PDF
ePub 版

From the London Athenæum.

teen per cent. rose in my throat, but I made an of the whole company of shareholders are set forth, effort and swallowed it. This was a pretty addi- Shakspeare's being among them. “This,” says tion to the list of advantages accruing to me from Mr. Collier,“ seems sufficiently to contradict the my introduction to these very " nice people.” idle story of his having commenced bis career by Loaned out of three hundred pounds by the son, holding horses at the play-house door; for, if and robbed of twenty; introduced to a hell, where true, he could hardly have made such way in his I sunk six hundred-proctored of nearly as much, profession as to establish himself a sharer within and flattered out of more than I can ever bring two or three years after his first appearance in the myself to name. To crown all, I entirely threw metropolis. In this document, that is, in 1559, away a year, got fooled by a flirt, and crippled for says Mr. Collier, “ Shakspeare's name is placed life. Have I given you sufficient reasons for twelfth in the list of the sixteen members of the shuddering at the very thought or mention of company. In 1596, he had so far advanced, that Nice People ?"

it was inserted fifth, when only eight of the assoJ. H. ciation were named; in 1603, he was second in

the new patent granted by King James on his accession. How much weight is due to these loca

tions, and what inferences we may fairly draw New Facts regarding the Life of Shakspeare. tainly show that Shakspeare, from the first, was

from them, it is not easy to decide, but they cerIn a Letter to Thomas Amyot, Esq., from J. gradually making his way to greater prominence Payne Collier. London: Rodd.

of station." This is a very interesting little volume. To It further appears, from records here produced, Mr. Collier we are already indebted for a valuable that there was continued enmity between the cor

History of English Dramatic Poetry,” and for poration of London and the actors at the Blackother like works, and he still, it appears, toils on friars, but the latter claimed to be beyond the in his labour of love, for which he is deserving jurisdiction of the former, in consequence of the the best thanks of the public. On this occasion theatre having been built on a site formerly occuhe has been fortunate almost beyond hope, and pied by a religious fraternity. In 1605, a formal certainly beyond all reasonable expectation. So complaint against them was made by the Lord little is really known of Shakspeare, that the most Mayor to the Privy Council, as appears from the trifling authentic fact becomes important, and yet following document:so many learned and laborious men have devoted their whole lives to hunting for information, that

“ LENARD HALIDAY Maior 1605. further search seemed all but hopeless in its re “Whereas Kempe, Armyn and others, Plaiers at the sults. It was, however, the good fortune of Mr. Blacke Fryers, have again not forborne to bring vpon Collier to have free access to the voluminous MSS. their stage one or more of the worshipfull Aldermen of at Bridgewater House, and the permission of Lord the City of London, to their great scandall and to the Francis Egerton to make use of any literary or lessening of their authority, the Lords of the right historical information he might discover. Among said Players before them and to enquire into the same, the most interesting of these documents are many that order may be taken to reniedy the abuse, either by of the official and other papers of Lord Ellesmere, Keeper of the Great Seal to Queen Elizabeth, and pulling down or removing the said Theatre.” Lord Chancellor to James I. : some of these had, The players, however, were more than a match it appeared, been arranged and classed by the Rev. for the corporation, and, accordingly, in 1608, we H. J. Todd, but large bundles, ranging in point of find the latter treating with, and attempting to date between 1581 and 1616, still remained un- buy them out. The curious document relating examined, and many had, ií is believed, never to this treaty, throws considerable light on the been opened from the time when, perhaps, the question of the amount of Shakspeare's property, chancellor's own hand tied them together. about five years before he retired to Stratford.

Shakspeare, according to the generally-received We are, indeed, of opinion, that Mr. Collier trusts opinion, came to London about 1586 or 1587, but too confidently to the player's estimate--but no he did not begin to write for the stage, or even to matter. remodel old plays, till about 1590 or 1591. The earliest date at which his name has hitherto been Collier," is a minute and curious account, showing the

Among the papers of Lord Ellesmere," says Mr. mentioned in connection with the Blackfriars precise interest of all the principal persons connected Theatre, is 1598, when it appears to a petition to with the company in 1608, and, among the rest, of Shakthe Privy Council, first printed in the “His ory speare himself. It is evident that it was drawn up in of Dramatic Poetry.” “But,” says Mr. Collier, order to ascertain what sum it would be necessary for the The MSS. at Bridgewater House now enable corporation to pay to the players for removal; and it me to furnish, not only the name of Shakspeare, inust have been laid before ihe lord chancellor, with but the names of the whole company of sharers other documents connected with the enquiry. Hence we seven years earlier.” It appears, that such was

learn that Shakspeare's property in the Blackfriars Thea. the license taken at that time by several of the tre, including the wardrobe and properties, which were companies of players, that persons were officially would be equal to between 60001. and 70001. of our pre

exclusively his, was estimated at more than 14001., which appointed to examine into and remedy the abuse. sent money. Burbage was even richer, as the owner of In consequence, a certificate, as it were, of good what is called the feel of the play-house, and perhaps character, was presented to the council by the he, or his father, had bought the ground on which it queen's players, and in this certificate the names stood as well as the building. However, it will be better

BLACK FRIERS.

first to insert a literal copy of the account, and after- of our present money. We are to recollect that in 1608 wards to offer some remarks upon it. The paper is en- he had produced most of his greatest works, the plausible titled

conjecture being that he wrote only five or six plays beFOR AVOIDING OF THE PLAYHOUSE IN THE PRECINCT OF THE tween that year and his final retirement from London.

In what way, and for what amount, he previously disImp. Richard Burbidge oweth the Fee,

posed of his interest in the Blackfriars and Globe theaand is alsoe a sharer therein. His

tres, it is useless to attempt to speculate." interest he rateth at the grosse

It is already known that, in 1602, Shakspeare summe of 1000 li for the Fee, and

bought 107 acres of land, which he attached to for bis foure shares the summe of

his house of New Place—that in 1605 he gave 333 li 6s. 8d.

1933 li. 6s. 8d. Item. Laz Fletcher oweth three shares

4401. for the lease of a moiety of the great and which he rateth at 700 li, that is at

small tithes of Stratford, and Mr. Collier now in7 yearcs purchase for each share

forms us, that it appears from a document, a copy or 33 li. 6s. 8d. one yeare with an

of which is given in the work before ns, preserved other

. 700 li.

among the Fines in the Chapter House, WestItem. W. Shakspeare usketh for the

minster, that, in 1603, he bought a messuage, Wardrobe and properties of the

with barn, granary, garden and orchard, at Stratsame play house 500 li and for his

ford, for 601 ! 4 shares, the same as bis fellowes

But the most interesting document discovered Burbidge and Fletcher viz 933 li.

is the following letter, addressed, Mr. Collier sup6s. 8d.

- 1433 li. 6s. 8d.

poses, to Lord Ellesmere, in order to induce him Item. Heminges and Condell eche 2 shares

to exert himself on behalf of the players, when

933 li. 6s. 8d. Item. Joseph Taylor ́1 share and an

assailed by the corporation of London. Here, halfe

350 li. however, we cannot but pause. This letter is Item. Lowing also one share and an

professedly a copy-why copied ? is it a contemhalfe

350 li.

porary, or a modern copy? These and other Item. Foure more playeres with one

questions we should feel bound to ask, if we were halfe share to eche of them. 466 li. 13s. 4d. examining the question as one of evidence; but

Mr. Collier's name is our trust and security, Suma totalis

6166. 13. 4.

“The initials, H. S.,” says Mr. Collier, "I take • Moreover, the hired men of the Companie demaund to be those of Henry Southampton, who was the some recompense for their great losse, and the Widowes noble patron of Shakspeare, and who, in this very and Orphanes of Playeres, who are paide by the Sharers letter, calls the poet his especial friend." It has at dieuers rates and proportions, so as in the whole it no direction, and the copy was apparently made will coste the Lo. Mayor and the Citizens at the least 7000 li.'

on half a sheet of paper; but there can be little

doubt that the original was placed in the hands This, you will own at once, is a very singular, as of Lord Ellesmere by Burbage, or by Shakspeare, well as a very valuable document, considering how scanty when they waited upon the lord chancellor in has hitherto been all our information regarding the pe. cuniary circumstances of our great poet. Till now all

company :has depended upon conjecture, both as to the value of “My verie honored Lord. The manie good offices I theatrical property generally in the time of Shakspeare, have received at your Lordships hands, which ought to and as to the particular sum he may be supposed to have make me backward in asking further favours, onely im. realised as an author of plays and as an actor of them. bouldens me to require more in the same kinde. Your

** We are to presume that the materials for this Lordship will be warned howe hereafter you graunt anie statement were derived from the actors, and that they sute, seeing it draweth on more and greater demaunds. made out their loss as large as it could well be shown to This which now presseth is to request your Lordship, in be, with a view to gaining full compensation ; but if each all you can, to be good to the poore players of the Black share produced on an average, or (to use the terms of the Fryers, who call them selues by authoritie the Seruaunts document) 'one year with another,' 331. 6s. 8d., the of his Majestie, and aske for the protection of their most twenty sharcs would net an annual sum of 6661. 138. 5d., graceous Maister and Sovereigne in this the tyme of or somewhat less than 3,4001. of our present money. their troble. They are threatened by the Lord Maior and Shakspeare's annual income from the receipts at the Aldermen of London, never friendly to their calling, with Blackfriars Theatre, without the amount paid him for the destruction of their meanes of livelihood, by the pull. the use of the wardrobe and properties, would therefore ing downe of theire plaiehouse, which is a private Theabe 1331. 68. 8d. It is possible, however, that there might tre, and hath neuer giuen ocasion of anger by anie disbe a deduction for his proportion of the rent to Burbage, orders. These bearers are two of the chiefe of the comand of the salaries to the hired men,' who were always panie; one of them by name Richard Burbidge, who paid by the sharers. To this income would be to be humblie sueth for your Lordships kinde helpe, for that added the sums he received for either new or altered he is a man famous as our English Roscius, one who plays. At about this date it appears that from 121. to 251. fitteth the action to the word and the word to the action were usually given for new dramatic productions. Much most admirably. By the exercise of his qualitye induswould of course depend upon the popularity of the author. try and good behaviour, he hath be come possessed of the

“We have a right to conclude that the Globe was at Blacke Fryers playhonse, which hath bene imployed for least as profitable as the Blackfriars: it was a public playes sithence it was builded by his Father now nere 50 theatre of larger dimensions, and the performances took yeres agone. The other is a man no whitt lesse deserv. place at a season when, probably, playhouses were more ing favor, and my cspeciall friende, till of late an actor frequented : if not, why should they have been built so of good account in the cumpanie, now a sharer in the as to contain a more numerous audience? At the lowest same, and writer of some of our best English playes, computation, therefore, I should be inclined to put Shak- which, as your Lordship knoweth were most singularly speare's yearly income at 3001., or not far short of 1,500l. I liked of Queen Elizabeth, when the cumpanie was called

[ocr errors][ocr errors]

66

name.

vpon to performe before her Matie at Court at Christmas I worke will rather be your Honors then myne. God and Shrovetide. His most gracious Matie King James makcth a poet, but his creation would be in vaine if alsoe, since his coming to the crowne, hath extended his patrons did not make him to live. Your Honor hath ever royall favour to the companie in divers waies and at sun showne your self the friend of desert, and pity it were drie tynes. This other hath to name William Shak. if this shold be the first exception to the rule. It shall speare, and they are both of one counlie, and indeede al- not be, while my pore witt and strength doe remaine to most of one towne: both are right famous in their quali me, though the verses which I now send be indeede no tyes though it longeth not to your Lo. gravitie and wise proofe of myne abilitie. I onely intreat your Honor to dome to resort unto the places where they are wont to accept the same, the rather as an earnest of my good delight the publique care. Their trust and sute nawe is will then as an example of my good deede. In all things not to bee molested in their waye of life whereby they I ain your Honors maintaine themselves and their wives and families (being "Moste bounden in dutie and observance, both married of good reputation) as well as the widowes

“ SAMUEL DANYEL." and orphanes of some of their dead fellows. " Your Lo. most bounden at com.

There can be no doubt, as Mr. Collier observes,

· H. S. that Michael Drayton, the poet, is the one party " Copia vera.”

referred to, and Shakspeare the other. Here, There is a great deal of curious matter inci- after once more offering our best thanks to Mr. dentally touched on by Mr. Collier, but we must Collier, for bis very interesting little volume, we confine ourselves to the immediate subject of his must conclude; but we beg leave, at parting, to interesting paper. Even the fact of Shakspeare direct the attention of our readers to the circular being associated in the patent for educating the lately issued by the Sbakspeare Club, and to be children of the Queen's Revels-the curious and found in another part of this day's Athenæum. minute description of the habit of Falstaff, as then played, we must pass, to come to the follow

From the New Monthly Magazine. ing letter, addressed by Samuel Daniel, the poet, to Lord Ellesmere, who, it is reasonable to sup

BURFORD'S PANORAMA OF JERUSALEM. pose, had procured for him the appointment of This is another of Mr. Burford's magnificent Master of the Queen's Revels. In this letter he panoramas; a rarer treat, both to the old and refers expressly to Shakspeare, though not by young, is not supplied by the metropolis. The

As Daniel was appointed to this office on work is painted from drawings made about a the 30th of January, 1603, Mr. Collier concludes year ago by Mr. Catherwood, the architect: they that the following letter was written shortly were taken, according to the printed description, after :

" from the terrace of the bouse of the aga, or “'To the right honourable St. Thomas Egerton, knight, governor, furmerly the palace of Pontius Pilate; Lord Keeper of the Great Seale of England.

and the view, both from the situation and heighi “ I will not endeavour, Right honourable, to thanke of the house, is most comprehensive and interestyou in wordes for this new great and unlookt for favor ing, embracing nearly, the whole of the important shown vnto mc, whereby I am bound to you for ever,

stations mentioned 'in scripture, and a vast hope one day with true harte and simple skill to that I ame not vnmindfull. Most earnestly doe I wish I assemblage of monasteries, mosques, domes, could praise as your Honor has knowne to deserue, for minarets, &c., which, though they generally then should I, like my maister Spenser, whose memorie resemble each other, are so dissimilar to any your Honor cherisheth, leave behinde me soine worthie thing European, that they excite curiosity, and, worke, to be treasured by posterity. What my pure being mostly of white stone, sparkle, under the Muse could performe in haste is here set downe, and rays of a glorious eastern sun, with inconceivable though it be farre below what other poets and better pens splendour. Immediately in front of the spectator, have written, it cometh from a gratefull harte and there. towards the south, stands boldly prominent with fore may be accepted. I shall now be able to live free most imposing effect, the beautiful mosque of the from those cares and troubles that hetherto have bene my Temple of Solomon, resembling, from its curious continuall and wearisome companions. But a little time style, and variety of gay colours, an immense my brothers advancement, and now I thanke you for piece of mosaic work, backed by the rugged myne owne; which double kindnes will alwaies receive summits of stony and unfruitful hills, a portion double gratefulnes at both our handes. I cannot but of the Dead Sea appearing in the distance, inknowe that I am lesse deserving then some who sued by closed by lofty and majestic mountains. Towards other of the nobility vnto her Matie for this roome: if the west, immediately beneath, commences the M. Draiton, my good friend, had bene chosen, I should Via Dolorosa, which may be traced in its ascent not have murmured, for sure I ame he wold have filled through the thickest part of the city, towards the it most excellentlie: but it seemeth to myne humble Temple of the Holy Sepulchre and Calvary, judgement that one who is the authour of playes now whose vast dome rises above the surrounding daylie presented on the public stages of London, and the buildings: on this side are also seen the Castle possessor of no small gaines, and moreover him selfe an and Tomb of David, and the Armenian Convent Actor in the Kings Companie of Comedians, could not on 'God's Holy Hill of Zion. To the north, with reason pretend to be Mr. of the Queenes Matice Re beyond a considerable portion of the city, for: vells, for as much as he wold sometimes be asked to ap merly the Daughter of Zion,' is seen the hill and more of like quality, cannot justiie be disappointed Scopo, where Titus fixed his head-quarters, and because through your Honours gracious interposition the other sterile hills, presenting only a few olivechar.ce was baply myne. I owe this and all else to your trees; and, towards the east, ihe most interesting honour, and if ever I have time and abilitie to finish anie portion is a long line of the city walls, beneath

ble vndertaking, as God graunt one daye I shall, the which lies the valley of Jehoshaphat; the Mount

From the London Athenæum.

roam,

stars are seen

of Olives, rising majestically in front, presenting That faultless loveliness which speaks a gentle seraph's the Mount of Ascension, and village of Olivet,

birth the Mount of Offence, garden of Gethsemane, A star, if ever star there were, upon the dewy earth! and other holy stations, relieved by patches of And now the mother looks for her, whene'er the silent cultivation and a few olive-trees, closes the view." night

Is gemind with countless stars serene, intensely, purely

bright; From the Monthly Magazine.

But to the eye of Faith alone, that vision fair is given

That mother may not see her child, until they meet in THE STAR-ENAMOURED.

heaven! " Who dwells among the stars, mamma—so mild, so fair,

W.G.T. and bright? As o'er us, in the dusky sky, they shed their lovely light: Methinks a gentle-beaming eye in every ray I see, A host of heavenly watchers set to guide and counsel me! “ This earth has many a flower, mamma, and many a

SHAKSPEARE'S MONUMENT AT STRATFORD. valley sweet, To balm the sense with fragrance pure, and rest the be excited by the publication of Mr. Collier's

We take advantage of the interest which must weary feet; And many a kindly face, mamma, we meet, as here we readers to the following extracts from a circular

interesting volume, to direct the attention of our The kindest and the dearest still, the nearer to our home. lately issued by the Shakspeare club, and referred

to a few week's since in this paper. “But oh ! mamma, I long to be a creature of the sky, To shine and shine for ever more in yon bright place on

“ The members of the Shakspearean club of Stratfordhigh.

upon-Avon, have long beheld with regret the disfigure. I long to be away-away !—from this pale prison free, ment of the bust and monument of Shakspeare, and the To look a long, long tearless look of endless love on thee! neglected condition of the interior of the chancel which

contains both that monument and his grave. They say that angel-forms, mamma, amongst those “ The monument erected to Shakspeare by his family

a few years after his death, representing the poet with a In everlasting whiteness clad, in never-dying sheen; cushion before him, a pen in his right hand, and his left And kindly looks they send to all whose hearts with leaning on a scroll, was originally coloured to resemble grief are riven,

life; but was thickly covered over with white paint in A forctaste sweet of faith's reward, when called to dwell the year 1793, at the instigation of Mr. Malone. The in heaven!

pen was long since detached by some visitor, and a re. “ And might not I-a child, mamma,-become a little cent attempt was made to abstract one of the fingers of star,

the bust, which was actually broken off, but recovered And shed my looks of light and love from yonder fields and replaced. The removal of the coating of white afar ?

paint, and the renewal of the original colours of the mon. You might not know my beams, mamma, but they would ument, are supposed to be practicable without the chance ever be

of injury to the original work. Directed, with a fervent glance, upon thy home and thee of Anne his wife; of Susannah his eldest daughter, and

“Near the grave of Shakspeare, lie interred the bodies " Then let me go and pray, mamma, that I may soar her husband, Dr. John Hall; of Thomas Nashe, Esq., the away,

husband of Elizabeth, the daughter of Dr. John Hall and And never lift my eyes again upon another day! Susannah his wife ; (Elizabeth having afterwards mar. I long to be among the stars—to feel their balmy light-ried Sir J. Barnard, of Abington, near Northampton, and Oh! let me go and pray, mamma ; good night, a long being there buried.) The inscriptions on some of the good night!"

grave-stones of these members of the poet's family, the The mother clasped her little child, and tenderly she said, stones being on the floor of the chancel, are partly oblitThou can'st not be a star as yet, my gentle little maid! erated; and an epitaph, commemorating the excellences But when thy lovely life is o'er, and God shall call his of Shakspeare's favourite daughter, was either worn out

or purposely effaced in 1707, and another inscription en. own, I trust that thou wilt be a star,—the brightest round his graved on the same stone, for a person unconnected with throne!

the family of Shakspeare.

“The respect due to the memory of Shakspeare, the “Thou canst not be a star as yet, for there is many a one loss of almost every personal relic of him, the demolition To whom thou art a light, my love, still shining softly on; of his house, the destruction of his traditionary mulberry And if thy lustre from this life should suddenly depart, tree, and the alteration and removal of the greater part "Twould quench thy mother's hopes on earth,-'twould of his father's residence, concur to make the members of break thy mother's heart !"

the Shakspearean club most anxious to preserve every But still the little lady pined, and none might say her thing connected with his mortal remains, from further

disrespect." nayHer soul was with the stars by night-her heart the live. In furtherance of these views, it is proposed to long day;

raise a fund by voluntary donations, not exceeding And on her infant pillow, cold, they found the little maid, one pound each, to be expended by a committee, In holy sleep, like angels' rest,_all beautifully laid !

already named by the members of the club, in Oh! who could see her as she lay in her mild beauty taking effectual measures to preserve the monudress'd,

ment of Shakspeare from all future injury; and, Nor feel a wish to share with her that deep unbroken if practicable, to restore its original colours, and

those on the full length figure of John Combe, the VOL. XXVII. AUGUST, 1835—26

rest

ve to performe before her Made at Court at Christmas I worke will rather be your Honors then myne. God aiad Sárovebide His must gracious Matie King James maketh a poet, but his creation would be in vaine if Bise, since his coming to the crowne, bath extended his patrons did not make him to live. Your Honor hath ever rorzu favour 19 the companie in divers wales and at sun showne your self the friend of desert, and pity it were este tranes This other bath to name William Shak- if this shold be the first exception to the rule. It shall ser, and they are both of one countie, and indeede al- not be, while my pore witt and strength doe remaine to mn Gane wounes both are right famous in their quali- me, though the verses which I now send be indeede no fres Landen langeth sot to your La graritie and wise proofe of myne abilitie. I onely intreat your Honor to om w stanie the places where they are wont to accept the same, the rather as an earnest of my good i tak peduae care. Their trust and sute nawe is will then as an example of my good deede. In all things Bu de les mansted in their waye of life whereby they I ain your Honors maintain themselves and their wives and families (being “Moste bounden in dutie and observance, bour married of good reputation as well as the widowes

“SAMUEL DANYEL." and orphanes at some of their dead fellows - Your La most bounden at com.

There can be no doubt, as Mr. Collier observes, -HS

that Michael Drayton, the poet, is the one party Cipia rera."

referred to, and Shakspeare the other. Here, There is a great deal of curious matter inci- after once more offering our best thanks to Mr. detail touched on by Mt. Collier, but we must Collier, for bis very interesting little volume, we ceane cuxires to the immediate subject of his must conclude; but we beg leave, at parting, to jateyesung paper. Eren the fact of Shakspeare direct the attention of our readers to the circular discared in the parent for educating the lately issued by the Shakspeare Club, and to be ca araw the Queens Rerels the curious and found in another part of this day's Athenæum. mare dreption of the habit of Falstaff, as 19-u pred we must pass to come to the follow

From the New Monthly Magazine. in klet, adressed by Samuel Daniel, the poet, Roland Ellesmere, who it is reasonable to sup

BURFORD'S PANORAMA OF JERUSALEM. , had procured for him the appointment of This is another of Mr. Burford's magnificent Master of the Queen's Rerels. In this letter he panoramas; a rarer treat, both to the old and refers expressly to Shakspeare, though not by young, is not supplied by the metropolis. The name is Tanel was appointed to this office on work is painted from drawings made about a laeth of January, 1608 Mr. Collier concludes year ago by Mr. Catherwood, the architect: they taat the following letter was written shortly were taken, according to the printed description, atleri

** from the terrace of the house of the aga, or "To the honourable & Thomas Egerton, knight, gorernor, formerly the palace of Pontius Pilate; land Niger or the Great Seale of England.

and the view, both from the situation and height "I walor endeavour, Right honourable, to thanke of the house, is most comprehensive and interesthow in winks for this new great and unlockt for favor ing, embracing nearly the whole of the important shiwa raia me, whereby I am bound to you for ever, and stations mentioned in scripture, and a vast hey use dar with true harte and simple skill to prore waar l amore non ramindfull Nest earnestly doe I wish I assemblage of monasteries, mosques, domes, market praise as your Honer has knowne ia deserue, for minarets, &c., which, though they generally ta skull I, uke my maister Spenser, whose memorie resemble each other, are so dissimilar to any your Honor cherisheth, leare behinde me some worthie thing European, that they excite curiosity, and, werke, to be treasured by posterity. What my pore being mostly of white stone, sparkle, under the Muse could performe in haste is here set downe, and rays of a glorious eastern sun, with inconceivable though it be larre below what other poets and better pens splendour. Immediately in front of the spectator, have written, it cometh from a gratefull harte and there towards the south, stands boldly prominent with fore may be accepted. I shall now be able to live free most imposing effect, the beautiful mosque of the from those cares and troubles that hetherto have bene my Temple of Solomon, resembling, from its curious continuall and wearisome companions. But a little time style, and variety of gay colours, an immense is past since I was called vpon to thanke your Honor for piece of mosaic work, backed by the rugged myne owne; which double kindnes will alwaies receive summits of stony and unfruitful hills, a portion double gratefulnes at both our handes

. I cannot but of the Dead Sea appearing in the distance, inknowe that I am lesse deserving then some who sued by closed by lofty and majestic mountains. Towards other of the nobility rato her Matie for this roome: if the west, immediately beneath, commences the M. Draiton, my good friend, had bene chosen, I should Via Dolorosa, which may be traced in its ascen! not have murmured, for sure I ame he wold have filled through the thickest part of the city, towards the it most ercellentlie: but it seemeth to myne humble Temple of the Holy Sepulchre and Calvary, judgement that one who is the authour of playes now whose vast dome rises above the surrounding daylie presented on the public stages of London, and the buildings: on this side are also seen the Castle possessor of no small gaines, and moreover him selfe an and Tomb of David, and the Armenian Convent Actor in the Kings Companie of Comedians, could not on God's Holy Hill of Zion. To the nordi, with reason pretend to be Mr. of the Queenes Matice Re beyond a considerable nortinn of the vells, for as much as he wold sometimes be asked to ap merly prove and allow of his owne writings. Therefore, he, and more of like quality, cannot justlic be disappointeil because through your Honours gracio char.ce was haply myne. I owe thi honour, and if ever I have time an noble vndertaking, as God graunt

[graphic]
« 上一頁繼續 »