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course you can; it says"-"Oh, thank you, I read distinctly,—' Mr Ochus Moss, Esq., Mary & a bone, to bee left at Mrs."-" It don't say no such a thing as Mary and a bone; it's where I formerly resided, at Marlebon, London, and it's addressed to be left at my grandmother's. Howsomever, my name you now know, at your service, Ochus Moss, of Marlebon, London."—" Any relation to the Fungus family?". Fungus! no, the Mosses of Marlebon. And now, sir, sitting with you on this here pork-chest, sailing away at the rate of-I suppose (looking anxiously about)-Captain!-where's the captain ?— Mate! mate, I say! (looking over the side) how many knots? nine, I look upon-upon it."-" Ay, nine knot-But, sir, your pipe wants a little more bacco. I see you know the valee of an old-stager; you smokes 'em till they be a reglar Sambo, and that's the proper ticketwhat say you?"-"Come, let us drink to the good luck of every mother's son on us-(drinking)—Here's luck!" " Ah, Mr. Ochus Moss, I little thought that I, an humble indiwidual—is that the correct texicography? that I, an in-di-wid-u- (00, is it, Mr. Moss?)"—(" Never mind the oo")—" that I, an-but I can go no further-should have fallen into the society of one so much after my own heart. Would it be too intruding in me to ask you, whilst we blow forth this princely weed, and beguile the fathoms, to give me an idea, a consolatory outline, of whether I am to set you down in my pocket-book as an Australian neighbour, or whether I must send you an invite a month beforehand to ask you when it will be agreeable to you to ask-(puff, puff,)—for me to invite you to a-a-the best my mansion can offer? you understand me." "I tell you what, Mr. Turkey, I have, from the time I first set foot aboard to this here very moment, entertained this—that is, I means to make my precious self”— ("Your precious self, Mr. Moss? You're right-memory serves")— "pretty comfortable—that is, if all goes along pretty bobbish; but if things goes anyhow at all, I flatters us we shall just about do the thing; but, as you seem a decentish sort of a fellow, and as we shall in all likelihood be a smartish bit together, I'll just tell you what brought me out to emigrate in these rum Australia countries. Now, your pipe, make yourself comfortable, and here goes.

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"You shall know, Mr. Turkey, that in my youth-for though rather an oldish codger now, I have been a youth, and as dapper a one too as

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--but self-praise, you know, friend Turkey, is no-But, excuse me, what a queer name your'n is, Turkey! it puts me in mind of Christmas: Turkey and sausages, or Turkey and forcemeat balls, and Turkey-" "Yes," interrupted the addressed, "Turkey carpets, Turkey rhubarb, and a few others, no doubt-memory serves. Well, as I was holding forthlet's see, where was I?" "You were 'as dapper a something-' "Oh, ay—well, I really was in those days remarkably sprightly; but(sorrowfully) I was then a youth. I received my edication at the Grammar School in the village; it was a sad neglected place to be sure, like all the rest o' that name, though it had lots of property, as most on 'em have, to make it very excellent as a school, and edicate no end on us; yet there was but about half-a-dozen when I was there, and the parson who pocketed the £700 a-year gave an old lame pensioner about £20 a-year to teach us 'rithmetic and syntax: but it was sadly managed— all was decay and ruin, even the rain used to come through the ceiling and wash out all our figuring; and when I left it, having got all my learning, there was scarcely any roof to it, and but about four lads there, at all." "I dare say," cried Mr. Turkey, "that even those were students upon the foundation?" the foundation?" "Well, I don't know about that, but upon leaving that seminary of logic, (Mr. Turkey blew out a cloud,) I was put apprentice to a man that renovated old hats, and made cast-off apparel look better nor new. I stayed touching up the castors and tickling the fat out of sleeves and coat-collars till my master found the old-hat trade but a very seedy 'fair arter all; and though he polished up other people and brought 'em all from the shade into the very broad daylight, yet in spite of his steam engine, for we did it upon scientific principles, the customers dropt off one by one like ripe apples, till at last the master calls me a one side, and he says-says he, 'Ochus,' says he, 'throw all those old leathers into the river; follow 'em up by the hoofs !"""Beg pardon, Mr. Moss, what leather and hoofs were they?" "Oh! bless your heart, they was the life and soul, secret and body, of the concern. We got from all quarters parings of leather, ditto of hoofs, and any other of those gummy sort of things, and biled 'em all together in a cauldon: that used to form, with a bushel of soot added, a thick, sticky compound; and with that same, if you had sent me the vilest old tile you ever had upon your precious poll, I could have

touched it up by those means to look like what now-a-days is called a thick-webbed spider 4s. 9d. gossamer, or a velvet Frenchy; if we'd a' gallooned the edges, you'd be astonished; and that same hat wore uncommon well till it rained, and then, in course, you might has well a' had a nightcap of tripe on your head, as anything like that, to feel dry and comfortable.-Well, where was I?—oh, ay, well, I felt rather astonished to hear my master give the word to throw all the valuables pack and package into the river, and at first thought he might be a matter or two malty; but no, he was as sober as a judge. So accordingly into the river I bundles all the parings, hoofs, and leather; which as soon as I had done, my master called me once more into a secret conference. 'I am a-goin, Ochus,' says he, 'to change my mode of life altogether.' So I should think,' says I. 'I am a-going,' says he, 'the very next blessed Sunday as comes, to be married to Mrs. Moffat, the pawnbroker's widow; and Moss, I am going to turn Uncle.' My surprise was beyond all control. I roared out, You're going to be married to Mrs. Moffat!' 'I am, next Sunday as ever comes, I am !' 'And,' cried I, are yer a-goin to turn the tender heart of the peaceable renovator into the grinder of the needy and distressed?' 'No, Ochus,' said he, not exactly the grinder on 'em, but upon the usual equitable principles." "Principles in a pawnbroker! did memory serve?" inquired Turkey. "Yes, upon equitable principles. I was bewildered; and when he offered to increase my little pay if I chose to remain a short time with him, as a sort of likes, we made a kind of bargain over a glass of gin-and-water, and I proceeded, according to his directions, to make as free with the old hats and the hat-blocks as I had done already with our sinners of war the stiffening.

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"A few days rolled away; the Sunday came, and Mrs. Moffat and my respected master Abraham Barlow were man and wife. The honeymoon was ushered in by Mrs. Barlow getting the painter to regild the balls, that had swung in sombre blackness as if in mourning for their late master; the outside of the house was fresh painted; the old jewelry I rouged and rubbed and arranged afresh, and a dashing framed glass, bearing the inviting words 'Money lent,' was placed in a favourable position in the little bow winder.

"Well, though I didn't much like the pawnbrokerin idear, howsomever

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to it I went tooth and nail. But it wouldn't do I couldn't abear the poverty and distress daily before my eyes. God bless you, Mr. Turkey, I've met such fine swells in the street, taking the wall of everybody, and blowing a long beak up, and every feather out for show, like a tormented Turkey cock!-Beg pardon, didn't mean to be personal. Well, and about the time that blessed Monday morning came round again, there was I tolling out half a sovereign or so-yes, it's true, week after week, enter and cross the thingummies half worn in the shop and half out. Then the misery-oh! the supplications, the begging and the praying for another shilling! Altogether I could not stand it, so I gave Master Barlow due warning, though it was a well-enough-paid place, and I was going to face the world like a thimblerigger arout the visible means. Well, I did—I left him hard at it, and one fine morning I walked my chalks to try my luck. I fell in next day with a gentleman's servant's place; but the maid-servants and I was rather too agreeable, and the master, though he looked over that as being natural, yet one thing stuck in his crop, and he never liked me arter that. I'll tell you how it war. You must know, I had all left-off clothes as perksites; and the master never wore 'em when they went seedy abit under the arms. Now, one of the wicked wenches put me up to this trick which I used 'twas just to tickle them abit in that situation with my—you won't go to mention it, Mr. Turkey?" 'No, upon my honour. What did you tickle them with ?” My penknife! So when they got so thin as you might see to read through, I shoved my thumb through at once; and when I was helping him on with his coat, I just tugged his shirt through the hole, and then made him hold up his arm at the glass. I found it never fail. But one unlucky day—I believe in unlucky days— he actually was watching me out of his window when I expected him not out of bed, and I forthwith, as he said, 'for my ingenuity,' had the sack. I have sold many a coat, but never off his back-always on his back. He was a fine-looking man; and when a dealer used to call for an article, I used to shut him up in the saddle-room till master came down to see the nags; so then I showed him his bargain to the best advantage, and he always had it by the end of the week. After leaving that place, I set up in a public, and should have done tolerably well, had not one of the confounded wenches from my old place wanted

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So I sold the goodwill of the concern, traps and all, and resolved at once to emigrate to South Australia. And here I am, highly gratified to find so excellent a gentleman as Mr. Turkey; for I see you are a gentleman, in every sense. You have got an after-cabin, ain't you?" "It may be called partly after, and partly intermediate; more comfortable, though more expensive. But I beg to thank you for your kind yarn; and, by two-headed Janus, Nature hath made strange fellows in her time.' I suspect, however, this to be grog-time o'day, if memory serves; so, if you will just whip down into my berth, you shall shoot the crow flying, as they say in the Low Countries."—" Do they?" said Moss ; well, then, I'll just have a pop at the crow, and it shan't be my fault if I miss him, for I'll put a good charge in, howsomever."

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