The Chinese: A General Description of the Empire of China and Its Inhabitants, 第 2 卷

封面
Charles Knight, 1836
 

讀者評論 - 撰寫評論

我們找不到任何評論。

其他版本 - 查看全部

常見字詞

熱門章節

第 183 頁 - On this unworthy scaffold to bring forth So great an object ; can this cockpit hold The vasty fields of France ? Or may we cram Within this wooden O the very casques That did affright the air at Agincourt...
第 182 頁 - By and by we hear news of shipwreck in the same place, and then we are to blame if we accept it not for a rock. Upon the back of that comes out a hideous monster with fire and smoke, and then the miserable beholders are bound to take it for a cave.
第 182 頁 - Now you shall have three ladies walk to gather flowers, and then we must believe the stage to be a garden. By and by we hear news of a shipwreck in the same place, and then we are to blame if we accept it not for a rock.
第 462 頁 - The Chinese seemed quite conscious of the real character of the occupation in which they were engaged; for, on attempting to enter several other places where the same process was going on, the doors were speedily closed upon the party. Indeed, had it not been for the influence of the Hongist who conducted them, there would have been little chance of their seeing as much as they did'.
第 202 頁 - The two banks of the river lie to the north and south ; Three bridges interrupt the stream, and form a communication : Vessels of every kind pass between the arches, While men and horses pace among the clouds (fogs) : A thousand masses of stone rise one above the other, And the river flows...
第 431 頁 - When thus coined in large quantities, this paper currency is circulated in every part of the grand khan's dominions; nor dares any person, at the peril of his life, refuse to accept it in payment. All his subjects receive it without hesitation, because, wherever their business may call them, they can dispose of it again in the purchase of merchandise they may have occasion for; such as pearls, jewels, gold, or silver. With it, in short, every article may be procured.
第 458 頁 - As it could not be fairly produced in any large quantities, the call for it on the part of the Americans was answered by cutting up and sifting other green...
第 249 頁 - ... in the bulk of the cocoons are killed by being placed in jars under layers of salt and leaves, with a complete exclusion of air. They are subsequently placed in moderately warm water, which dissolves the glutinous substance that binds the silk together, and the filament is wound off upon reels. This is put up in bundles of a certain size and weight, and either becomes an article of merchandise under the name of " raw silk," or is subjected to the loom, and manufactured into various stuffs, for...
第 195 頁 - Dragoni, the frontier of the Tartar territories and those of China. This southern shore is the Emperor's — on the northern side commences our Tartar dominion. " Princess — (to the Khan.) Great King, I take a cup of wine, and pour a libation towards the south — my last farewell to the Emperor. (Pours the libation.) Sovereign of Han, this life is finished : I await thee in the next!" With these words she throws herself into the river, and perishes ; and here the tragedy might properly end.
第 41 頁 - ... notions of independence and equality, but principles of dependence and subordination, as of children to parents, the younger to the elder, and so on. These principles are perpetually inculcated in the Confucian writings, as well as embodied in solemn ceremonials, and in apparently trivial forms of mere etiquette. It is probably this feature of his doctrines, that has made him such a favorite with all the governments of China for many centuries past, and down to this day. These principles and...

書目資訊