The Natural History of Gallinaceous Birds: Vol. I. Illustrated by Thirty-two Plates, Coloured

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W.H. Lizars, and Stirling and Kenney; Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longman, London; and W. Curry jun. and Company Dublin., 1834 - 232 頁
 

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第 203 頁 - gainst that season comes Wherein our Saviour's birth is celebrated, The bird of dawning singeth all night long ; And then...
第 5 頁 - Low.— -Elements of Practical Agriculture ; comprehending the Cultivation of Plants, the Husbandry of the Domestic Animals, and the Economy of the Farm. By D.
第 4 頁 - Murray's Encyclopaedia of Geography ; comprising a complete Description of the Earth : Exhibiting its Relation to the Heavenly Bodies, its Physical Structure, the Natural History of each Country, and the Industry, Commerce, Political Institutions, and Civil and Social State of All Nations. Second Edition ; with 82 Maps, and upwards of 1,000 other Woodcuts. 8vo. price 60s. Neale.
第 205 頁 - The hen is hung at a fellow's back, who has also some horse-bells about him ; the rest of the fellows are blinded, and have boughs in their hands, with which they chase this fellow and his hen about some large court or small enclosure. The fellow with his hen and bells shifting as well as he can, they follow the sound, and sometimes hit him and his hen, other times, if he can get behind one of them, they thresh one another well...
第 134 頁 - ... but in a voice resembling that of the tame turkey when he hears any unusual or frequently repeated noise. Where the turkeys are numerous, the woods, from one end to the other, sometimes for hundreds of miles, resound with this remarkable voice of their wooing, uttered responsively from their roosting places. This is continued for about an hour; and, on the rising of the sun, they silently descend from their perches, and the males begin to strut for the purpose of winning the admiration of their...
第 134 頁 - The sexes roost apart, but at no great distance, so that, when the female utters a call, every male within hearing responds, rolling note after note, in the most rapid succession ; not as when spreading the tail and strutting near the hen, but in a voice resembling that of the tame turkey, when he hears any unusual or frequently repeated noise. Where the turkeys are numerous, the woods, from one end to the other, sometimes for hundreds of miles, resound with this remarkable voice of their wooing,...
第 20 頁 - AMERICAN ORNITHOLOGY; or, the NATURAL HISTORY of the BIRDS of the UNITED STATES. By ALEXANDER WILSON ; with a Continuation by CHARLES LUCIAN BONAPARTE, Prince of Muyignnno.
第 150 頁 - I.— 38 had among other wild-birds, a urn. male turkey, which had been reared, from its earliest youth, under my care ; it having been caught by me when probably not more than two or three days old. It became so tame that it would follow any person who called it, and was the favourite of the little village. Yet it would never roost with the tame turkeys, but regularly betook itself, at night, to the roof of the house, where it remained until dawn. When two years old. it began to fly to the woods,...
第 141 頁 - ... remarkable manoeuvre. The owl sails around the spot to select his prey ; but, notwithstanding the almost inaudible action of his pinions, the quick ear of one of the slumberers perceives the danger, which is immediately announced to the whole party by a chuck; thus alarmed, they rise on their legs, and watch the motions of the owl, who, darting like an arrow, would inevitably secure the individual at which he aimed, did not the latter suddenly drop his head...
第 124 頁 - On the top Of yon magnolia the loud turkey's voice Is heralding the dawn; from tree to tree Extends the wakening watch-note, far and wide, Till the whole woodlands echo with the cry.

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