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Otsego, July 23, 1887, aged fifty-eight years.

Bunt, Richard.—He was a native of Virginia, and a Senator in Congress, from that State, from 1809 to January 2, 1815, when he died.

Burch, John Chiltom.—Born in Boone County, Missouri, February 1, 1826; received a liberal education and studied law; held the position of Military Secretary to the Governor of Missouri; in 1850 he emigrated to California, and turned his attention to mining; in 1853 he was elected District Attorney for his county, and commenced the practice of law; in 1856 was returned to the Assembly, and in 1857 to the State Senate, where he remained until 1859, when he was elected a Representative, from California, to the Thirtysixth Congress, serving as a member of the Committee on Agriculture.

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Burges, Tristam.—Born in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, February 26, 1770, and died in Rhode Island, October 18, 1853. He graduated at the Rhode Island College; studied law and taught school at the same time; commenced the practice of his profession in Providence, and acquired great influence and distinction as an advocate; in 1811 was elected Chief Justice of Rhode Island; occupied the Chair of Oratory in Brown University; and was a Representative in Congress, from 1825 to 1835. He acquired great reputation by a parliamentary contest with John Randolph, and left behind him many interesting pamphlets on political and literary subjects. His characteristics as a debater, were withering sarcasm, combined with fervid eloquence and rare reasoning power.

Burgess, Dempsy. He was a member of the Provincial Congress of North Carolina; a Lieutenant-colonel of the militia; and a Representative in Congress, from 1795 to 1798.

Burke, Edamus. He was born in Galway, Ireland, and came to America

at the beginning of the Revolution. In 1778 he was appointed a Judge of the Supreme Court of South Carolina, and was a Representative in Congress, from 1789 to 1791. He was an earnest Republican, and died at Charleston, March 30, 1802, aged fifty-nine years.

Burke. Edmund.—Born in Westminster, Vermont, January 23, 1809; was educated by private tutors; studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1829; and removed to New Hampshire in 1833, where he established, in Sullivan County, the New Hampshire Argus, which he edited a number of years. He was a Representative in Congress, from New Hampshire, from 1839 to 1845, and was Chairman of the Committee on the Library, and a member of the Committees on Commerce and Claims; and, by President Polk, was appointed Commissioner of Patents in Washington.

Burleigh, William. He was born in Rockingham, New Hampshire, bred a lawyer, and was a Representative in Congress, from South Berwick, York County, Maine, for two terms, from 1823 to 1827, and was a member of the Committee on Expenditures in the State Department. Died in July, 1827.

Burlingame, Anson.— Born in New Berlin, Chenango County, New York, November 14, 1822. His youth was spent on the Western frontiers, at one time acting with surveying parties and at another participating in the making of Indian treaties, far beyond the confines of civilization. He laid the foundation of his education at the Branch University of Michigan, but removing to Massachusetts, he entered Harvard University, where he received a degree in 1846. He studied law and practised in Boston. In 1852 he was elected to the State Senate, and in 1853 was a member of the Convention for revising the Constitution of Massachusetts. He was elected a Representative in the Thirty-fourth Congress; was reelected to the Thirty-fifth, serving as a member of the Committee on Foreign Affairs. He was also re-elected to the Thirty-sixth Congress, serving on the same committee. In 1861 he was appointed by President Lincoln Minister to Austria, and subsequently to China.

Burmell, Barker.—He was a native of Nantucket. When only twentytwo years of age he was chosen a member of the House of Representatives in his native Commonwealth. A few years later, he passed into the Senatorial body, where, in i. of his youth, he became a leading member. He sat also in the Convention which framed the present Constitution of Massachusetts; took an active part in the Harrisburg Convention of 1840, and served as a Representative in Congress, from 1841 to 1843. He died in Washington, District of Coolumbia, June 4, 1848, aged forty-five years.

Burmett, Jacob. —Was born in Newark, New Jersey, on the 22d of February, 1770. He was a graduate of Princeton College in 1791; was admitted to the bar by the Supreme Court of New Jersey in 1796, and removed to Cincinnati immediately thereafter, where he continued to reside until his death. During the first twenty years of that residence, he devoted himself to the practice of his profession, and was ranked among. the most distinguished members of the bar. When the second grade of the Territorial government was established, in 1799, he was appointed, by President Adams, a member of the Legislative Council, which appointment he held till the establishment of the State government of Ohio, in the winter of 1802–3. He was a member of the State Legislature during the war of 1812, and took an active part in sustaining the measures proposed in that body, to aid the General Government in maintaining the contest. In 1821 he was appointed one of the Judges of the Supreme Court of Ohio, which commission he resigned in December, 1828, and was immediately after elected to the Senate of the United States, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of his friend General Harrison, serving until 1831. In the same year he was chosen, by the Legislature of the State of Kentucky, one of the commissioners to settle the matters in controversy between that State and the Commonwealth of Virginia, in regard to the complaints of the latter against the statute of limitation. He was the first President of the Astronomical Society of Cincinnati, and still continued, in 1852, an active member of that institution. He was, for many years, the

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Burnham, Alfred A.—Born in Windham, Windham County, Connecticut, March 8, 1819; prepared himself for college, at the Suffield Literary Institution; taught school for a while, and spent one year at Washington College, which he left for want of means; studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1843; was elected to the Connecticut Legislature in 1844 and 1845; was Clerk of the State Senate in 1846; and was subsequently appointed Judge of Probate for the District of Danbury. In 1850 he was again elected to the State Legislature; in 1857 Lieutenant-Governor of Connecticut; in 1858 again elected to the Legislature and made Speaker; and in 1859 was elected a Representative, from Connecticut, to the Thirty-sixth Congress, serving as a member of the Committee on Patents. Re-elected to the Thirty-seventh Congress, serving on the Committee on Foreign Affairs.

Burns, Joseph.-Born in Waynesborough, Augusta County, Virginia, March 11, 1800; was educated at the Ohio Union Schools; was by trade a hatter and then a farmer; has filled various County and State offices; and was elected, from the State of Ohio, a Representative in the Thirty-fifth Congress. He was a member of the Committees on Expenditures in the Post-office Department and on Invalid Pensions.

Burns, Robert.—He was born in New Hampshire; served three years in the State Legislature as Senator and Representative, and was a Representative in Congress, from New Hampshire, from 1833 to 1837.

Burnside, Thomas.-Was an ASsociate Judge of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, and was a Representative in Congress, from that State, from 1815 to 1819. He died at Germantown, Pennsylvania, March 25, 1827.

Burr, Aaron.—He was born in Newark, New Jersey, February 6, 1756. He graduated at Princeton College in 1772, at the age of sixteen; in 1775, in his twentieth year, he joined the American army under Washington, at Cambridge; accompanied General Arnold as a private soldier in his expedition against Quebec; after his arrival there, he acted as an aide-de-camp to General Montgomery; and on his return, in 1776, General Washingtoninvited him to join his family at headquarters. Some circumstances soon took place, by which he forever lost the confidence of Washington; and the hostility of the former to the latter, from that time, was undisguised and unmitigated. In 1777, he was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel, and distinguished himself as an able and brave officer; but in March, 1779, he was, on account of the state of his health, compelled to resign his office, and retire from military life. He then devoted himself to the study of law; commenced practice at Albany, in 1782, but soon removed to the city of New York; he became distinguished in his profession ; was appointed Attorney-General of New York in 1789; from 1791 to 1797 he was a member of the United States Senate, and bore a conspicuous part as a leader of the Democratic or Republican party. At the election of President of the United States for the fourth Presidential term, Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr had each seventy-three

votes, and the choice was decided by Congress, on the thirty-sixth ballot, in favor of Jefferson for President, and Burr for Vice-President. On the 12th of July, 1804, Colonel Burr gave Alexander Hamilton, long his professional rival and political.opponefit, a mortal wound in a duel. He soon after conceived the project of his enterprise in the Western country of the United States; for which he was at length apprehended and brought to Richmond, in August, 1807, on a charge of treason; and after a long trial, was acquitted. He afterwards returned to the city of New York, practised law to some extent, but passed the remainder of his life in comparative obscurity and neglect. He was of small stature, yet he had a lofty mien, a military air, a remarkably brilliant eye, and a striking appearance. He possessed distinguished talents and many accomplishments. He died on Staten Island, New York, September 14, 1836.

Burrill, James.—He was born in Providence, Rhode Island, April 25, 1772; graduated at Brqwn University, in 1788; studied law, devoted himself to its practice, and was Attorney-General of the State of Rhode Island, from 1797 to 1813; was a member and Speaker of the Assembly in 1814; and was Chief Justice of the State in 1816. He was elected to the United States Senate in 1816, and served as a member of the Committees on the Judiciary, on Commerce, on Manufactures, and on Accounts. He died at Washington, before the expiration of his term, December 25, 1820. He was considered an able scholar and a wise judge.

Burroughs, Silas M.–He was born in New York; served four years in the Legislature of that State, and was elected a Representative to the Thirty-fifth Congress, from New York, and was a member of the Committee on Indian Affairs. He was re-elected to the Thirty-sixth Congress, and died at Medina, New York, June 3, 1860.

Burrows, Daniel.-He was born in Groton, Connecticut, and was a Representative in Congress, from Connecticut, from 1821 to 1823.

, Burrows, Lorenzo.—He was born in Connecticut, and was a Representa

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same position, and was in this office at the time of his death, which occurred at his home, May 25, 1857. He was a statesman of distinguished ability and much influence, possessed an uncommon degree of both mental and physical ability, and in every particular was a high-toned gentleman. He was popular in the Senate, and left behind him many deeply attached friends.

Butler, Chester.—Born in Wilkesbarre, Luzerné County, Pennsylvania, in March, 1798; graduated at Princeton College in 1817; read law at the Litchfield School, and was admitted to the bar in 1820. He was a Representative in Congress, from Pennsylvania, from 1845 to 1850, and was a member of the Committee on Revolutionary Claims. He died in Philadelphia October 5, 1850.

Butler, Ezra.-He was a Representative in Congress, from Vermont, from 1813 to 1815, and Governor of that State during the years 1826 and 1827. He died at Waterbury, Vermont, July 19, 1838.

Butler, Josiah. —Born in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, in 1780, and died at Deerfield, October 29, 1854. He graduated at Harvard University in 1803; studied law in Virginia, and practised it in his native State. He was repeatedly elected to the State Legislature; was a county Sheriff, and a Clerk of the courts. He was elected a Representative in Congress, in 1817, and served in that capacity until 1823, officiating as Chairman of the Committee on Agriculture during the Seventeenth Congress. He was then appointed Judge of the Superior Court of New Hampshire, which he held until the office was abolished.

Butler, Pierce.—He came of the family of the Dukes of Ormond, in Ireland. Before the Revolution he was a Major in a British regiment in Boston, but afterwards attached himself to the republican institutions of America. In 1787, he was a Delegate, from South Carolina, to the old Congress; in 1788, a member of the Convention which framed the Constitution of the United States, and, under it, was one of the first Senators from South Carolina, and remained in Congress till 1796. On the death of J. E. Calhoun, in 1802, he became again a Senator, but resigned in 1804. He was opposed to some of the measures of Washington’s administration, but approved of the war of 1812. He died at Philadelphia, February 15, 1822, aged seventy-seven.

Butler, Samson H.-He was born in South Carolina, and was a Representative in Congress, from that State, from 1840 to 1843.

Butler, Thomas.-He was born in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and was a Representative in Congress, from Louisiana, from 1818 to 1821. Died August 14, 1847.

Butler, Thomas B.-He was born in Wethersfield, Connecticut, in 1807; was educated a lawyer; served in the Connecticut Legislature; and was a Representative in Congress, from Connecticut, from 1849 to 1851.

Butler, William.—He was the father of the late Senator, A. P. Butler, and graduated at the College of South Carolina, as a student of medicine; served as an officer and surgeon both in the army and navy of the United States; and was a Representative in Congress, from South Carolina, from 1801 to 1811. He died December 8, 1821.

Butler, William.—He was a native of South Carolina; graduated at the South Carolina College in 1810; and a Representative in Congress, from South Carolina, from 1841 to 1843. He was the brother of the late Senator, A. P. Butler, and his wife was the sister of the late Commodore O. H. Perry.

Butler, William O.-He was born in Jessamine County, Kentucky, in 1793, and came of a family honorably identified with the Revolution. He was liberally educated, and when the war of 1812 broke out, he enlisted as a soldier; was an ensign under General Winchester, at the battle of the River Raisin; and under General Jackson, in the South, he attained the rank of Captain, and was made a Colonel in 1817. After spending many years in retirement, he was elected a Representative in Congress, from Kentucky, in 1839, and reelected in 1841; and during the war with Mexico he obtained such distinction, that he was promoted to the posi

tion of Major-General in the regular army; a sword was voted to him by Congress, March 2, 1847; and when General Scott was recalled from the City of Mexico, General Butler was left chief in command, and announced the ratification of the treaty of peace, May 29, 1848. In 1848 he was the Democratic candidate for Vice-President, on the ticket with Lewis Cass for President. He was appointed, by President Pierce, Governor of Nebraska Territory, but declined the appointment. He is the author of many fugitive pieces of poetry, several of which possess uncommon merit, and one, entitled “The Boat Horn,” has attained great popularity. In 1861 he was a member of the Peace Congress held in Washington.

IBattman, Samuel. — He was a member of the Maine Legislature in 1822, 1826, and 1827, and a Representative in Congress, from Penobscot County, Maine, from 1827 to 1831, and was a member of the Committee on Internal Improvements. In 1846 he was a County Commissioner, and in 1853 was re-elected to the Legislature, and made President of the Senate.

Butterfield, Martin. He was elected a Representative, from New York, to the Thirty-sixth Congress, serving as Chairman of the Committee on Agriculture.

Bynam, Jesse A.—Born in Halifax County, North Carolina. He was educated at Union College, New York; served a number of years in the State Legislature; and was a member of Congress, from 1833 to 1841. While in Congress he fought a duel with Daniel Jenifer, which terminated harmlessly; and at the close of his last term he removed to Louisiana.

Cabell, Edward C.—Born in Richmond, Virginia, in 1817; graduated at the University of Virginia; and in 1837 removed to the Territory of Florida, where he settled as a cotton planter. He represented the State of Florida in Congress, from 1847 to 1853.

Cabell, Samuel J.--In the beginning of the war of the Revolution he was at William and Mary College, and left there to join the first armed corps raised in Virginia, and soon attained

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