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to Jehoshaphat presents; and he had riches and honour in abundance. And his heart was lifted up in the ways of Jehovah : moreover, he took away the high places and groves out of Judah. *

Under the influence of this pious feeling, in the third year of his reign, Jehoshaphat sent to his princes to teach in the cities of Judah, and with them he sent Levites and priests ; and they taught in Judah, and had the book of the law of Jehovah with them; and went about throughout all the cities of Judah, and taught the people. And the fear of Jehovah fell upon all the kingdoms of the lands that were round about Judah, so that they made no war against Jehoshaphat. Also some of the Philistines brought Jehoshaphat presents, and tribute silver; and the Arabians brought him flocks, 7,700 rams, and 7,700 he goats. And Jehoshaphat waxed great exceedingly; and he built in Judah castles and cities of store. And he bad much business in the cities of Judah; and the men of war, mighty men of valour, were in Jerusalem.t

Now Jehoshaphat had riches and honour in abundance, and joined affinity with Ahab. And after certain years he went down to Ahab, to Samaria. And Ahab killed sheep and oxen for him in abundance, and for the people that he had with him, and persuaded him to go up with him to Ramoth Gilead. And Abab, king of Israel, said unto Jehoshaphat, king of Judah, Wilt thou go with me to Ramoth-Gilead ? and he answered him, I am as thou art, and my people as thy people; and we will be with thee in the war. I

* 2 Chron, xvii. 3–6. + 2 Chron. xvii. 9–13. The names of bis officers were Adnah, the commander-in-chief; Jehohanan, the captain; Amaziah, a volunteer; Eliada, of Benjainin; Jehozabad; and their uaited force amounted to 1,160,000 men, besides the troops in garrison. 2 Chron. xvii. 14 - 19.

2 Chron. xviii, 1–3.

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It came to pass when David was i.

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said unto him, Forasmuch as thi st not kept my covenant and mmanded thee, I will surely rei d will give it to thy servant. N will not do it, for David thy fath out of the hand of thy son. Ho

the kingdom : but will give on y servant's sake, † and for Jeru osen ;* thus, however, in judg d his loving kindness to David.

In execution of this solemn eighbouring princes were all uring the remainder of his anquillity of his latter end; vi. Kings, xi. 1–8.

See a curious pl

ler's Pisgah Sight of - The prevailing lion must come or y the tribe must be preserved, bu ht. All this must be done for the - undoubtedly what God had in vie ing the tribe of Judah, and the zral a defection. A. CLARKE.

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influence of this pious feeling, in the third year
Jehoshaphat sent to his princes to teach in the
ab, and with them he sent Levites and priests;
ght in Judah, and had the book of the law of
1 them; and went about throughout all the cities
1 taught the people. And the fear of Jehovah
the kingdoms of the lands that were round about
at they made no war against Jehoshaphat. Also
Philistines brought Jehoshaphat presents, and
; and the Arabians brought him flocks, 7,700
.700 he goats. And Jehoshaphat waxed great
and he built in Judah castles and cities of store.
much business in the cities of Judah; and the
mighty men of valour, were in Jerusalem.t
shaphat had riches and honour in abundance,
.ffinity with Ahab. And after certain years he
Ahab, to Samaria. And Ahab killed sheep and
i in abundance, and for the people that he had
d persuaded him to go up with him to Ramoth
d Abab, king of Israel, said unto Jehoshaphat,
ih, Wilt thou go with me to Ramoth -Gilead ?
ered him, I am as thou art, and my people as
and we will be with thee in the war.

2 Chron, xvii. 3-6. xvii. 9-13. The names of his officers were Adnah, r-in-chief; Jehohanan, the captain; Amaziah, a voda, of Benjainin; Jehozabad; and their united force 1,160,000 men, besides the troops in garrison. 2 Chron.

1 2 Chron. xviii, 1–3.

before you, but go and serve other gods, and worship them; then will I cut off Israel out of the land which I have given them; and this house which I have hallowed for my name, will I cast out of my sight; and Israel shall be a proverb and a by-word among all people ;* and at this house, which is high, every one that passeth by it shall be astonished, and shall hiss; and they shall say, Why hath Jehovah done thus unto this land, and to this house? And they shall answer, Because they forsook Jehovah, their God, who brought forth their fathers out of the land of Egypt, and have taken hold upon other gods, and have worshipped them, and served them; therefore bath Jehovah brought upon them all this evil.f

Besides the cedar wood and artificers with which Hiram had supplied Solomon for these important erections, he also sent him six score talents of gold,; and four hundred and fifty talents of gold from Ophir;& and Solomon in return, over and beyond the corn, wine, and oil, which he had contracted to pay his servants,ll gave him also twenty cities in the land of Galilee; with which, however, he does not appear to have been satisfied, for he called them Cabul. T

This highly favoured monarch also built Millo, and the wall of Jerusalem, and Hagor, and Megiddo, and Gezer,

* How is it possible that an infidel can resist the effect of the ex.
act fulfilment of this and similar prophecies, in every Jew he sees
or hears of, from the richest to the poorest amongst them ?
+ 1 Kings, ix. 1--9. 2 Chron. vii. 11–22.

1 1 Kings, ix. 14.
$ 1 Kings, ix. 28. 2 Chron. ix. 10.

|| 2 Chron. ii. 10. 1 Kings, v. II.
I 1 Kings, ix. 11-13. 2 Chron. viii. 2. The word Cabul signi-
fies displeasing or dirty. They seem to have been small towns in
the vicinity of Tyre, beyond the boundaries of the land, as divided
by Joshua, and lately taken from the ancient inhabitants. Scott,
in 1 Kings, ix.

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which Pharaoh, king of Egypt, having taken and burnt, and slain the Canaanites who dwelt there, gave for a present to his daughter. He also went to Hamathzobah, and prevailed against it, and built Bethhoron the upper, and Bethhoron the nether, Baalath, and Tadmor* in the wilder

Tadmor in the wilderness ; afterwards the city and powerful state of Palmyra, whose splendid ruins still constitute one of the grandest monuments of the remains of antiquity, and one of the most interesting spectacles to travellers. “ To the west, about midway between Orouros and Emesa, in the vast desert which connects Syria with Arabia, is Palmyra, or Tadamora, the city of palm trees. It was a most powerful city under its celebrated queen, Zenobia, the wife of Odenatus. She opposed the Emperor Aurelian, in the plains of Syria, at the head of 700,000 men, and had nearly defeated him, but was overthrown and carried captive to Italy, A. D. 273, where she had large possessions assigned to her near the Tiber. She was no less an accomplished than a brave princess, and had for her secretary the celebrated Longinus, the reputed author of the well-known treatise on the sublime." Butler's Geography, 203. See more particular accounts of Palmyra, &c. in the following works: Ancient Universal History, vol. i. 367. Guthrie's General History, vol. i. 167. Prideaux, vol. iv. 590. Gibbon, chap. xi. Buckingham's Travels among the Arab Tribes, 428. Volney's Travels in Syria and Egypt, vol. ii. chap. 20. The most minute account is given by Dawkins, Wood, and Bouve from whom the above ers have largely borrowed ; and by Dr. Halley, in the Philosophical Transactions; but the most interesting statements may be seen in Wells's Scripture Geography, vol. ii. 61–79. C. T. Middleton's Geography, vol. j. 87—90. Folio. London, 1778. And Crevier's Lives of the Roman Emperors, vol. ix. 147—175. See also Sel. ler's Antiq. of Palm. London, 1696. And Quarterly Journal of Education, No. iii. p. 131.

The valley of salt, where David got him a name by smiting the Syrians, is about four miles from this city. 2 Sam. viii. 13. Harmer, amongst a variety of interesting remarks, has the following : " To those who feel something of an incredulous anxiety, about the accounts which the sacred writers have given us, of the extent of the kingdom, and of the fame of Israel in the days of David and

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