Browning and Wordsworth

封面
Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, 2004 - 199 頁
Wordsworth's poetry was far more influential upon that of Robert Browning than has hitherto been supposed. Browning read Wordsworth from an early age, and became an admirer of much of his work. In particular, Wordsworth's aesthetic beliefs about the poet's role in the world were as important to Browning's own conception of this role as those of Shelley, whose relationship with Browning has been far more extensively discussed. relationship, which can usefully be seen as a struggle on Browning's part to throw off the burden of influence imposed upon him by his Romantic predecessor. It also puts forward more historical and biographical explanations for some of the relationship's complexities, including Browning's awareness of Wordsworth's rising reputation in the late Victorian period and the responsibilities imposed upon him in his later career by his own position as a literary lion. John H. Baker teaches for the Open University and the University of Westminster in London.

搜尋書籍內容

讀者評論 - 撰寫評論

我們找不到任何評論。

內容

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
7
A NOTE ON TEXTS
9
WHY BROWNING AND WORDSWORTH?
15
WORDSWORTH AND BROWNINGS REJECTION OF ROMANTICISM
23
PARACELSUS THE PROBLEM SOLVED
36
WORDSWORTH REJECTED
73
WORDSWORTH ERASED
92
THE BROWNINGKNIGHT CORRESPONDENCE WORDSWORTH DISNTERRED
117
BROWNINGS WORDSWORTH SELECTION
130
BROWNING AND THE PRELUDE
149
CONLCUSION
172
NOTES
177
BIBLIOGRAPHY
189
INDEX
194
版權所有

其他版本 - 查看全部

常見字詞

熱門章節

第 145 頁 - Tis a note of enchantment ; what ails her ? She sees A mountain ascending, a vision of trees; Bright volumes of vapour through Lothbury glide, And a river flows on through the vale of Cheapside.
第 81 頁 - How exquisitely the individual Mind (And the progressive powers perhaps no less Of the whole species') to the external World Is fitted : — and how exquisitely, too — Theme this but little heard of among men — The external World is fitted to the Mind; And the creation (by no lower name Can it be called) which they with blended might Accomplish : — this is our high argument.
第 145 頁 - ... Bright volumes of vapour through Lothbury glide, And a river flows on through the vale of Cheapside. Green pastures she views in the midst of the dale, Down which she so often has tripped with her pail ; ; And a single small cottage, a nest like a dove's, The one only dwelling on earth that she loves. She looks, and her heart is in heaven : but they fade, The mist and the river, the hill and the shade : The stream will not flow, and the hill will not rise, And the colours have all passed away...
第 51 頁 - Accordingly, such a language, arising out of repeated experience and regular feelings, is a more permanent, and a far more philosophical language, than that which is frequently substituted for it by Poets, who think that they are conferring honour upon themselves and their art, in proportion as they separate themselves from the sympathies of men, and indulge in arbitrary and capricious habits of expression...
第 100 頁 - Better than such discourse doth silence long, Long, barren silence, square with my desire ; To sit without emotion, hope, or aim, In the loved presence of my cottage-fire, And listen to the flapping of the flame, Or kettle whispering its faint undersong.
第 106 頁 - The invisible world, doth greatness make abode, There harbours; whether we be young or old, Our destiny, our being's heart and home, Is with infinitude, and only there ; With hope it is, hope that can never die, Effort, and expectation, and desire, And something evermore about to be.
第 46 頁 - Did both find helpers to their hearts' desire, And stuff at hand, plastic as they could wish, — Were called upon to exercise their skill, Not in Utopia, — subterranean fields, — Or some secreted island, Heaven knows where ! But in the very world, which is the world Of all of us, — the place where, hi the end, We find our happiness, or not at all...
第 56 頁 - Beauty — a living Presence of the earth, Surpassing the most fair ideal Forms Which craft of delicate Spirits hath composed From earth's materials — waits upon my steps ; Pitches her tents before me as I move, An hourly neighbour.
第 164 頁 - Rise up, thou monstrous ant-hill on the plain Of a too busy world ! Before me flow, Thou endless stream of men and moving things ! Thy every-day appearance, as it strikes— With wonder heightened, or sublimed by awe— On strangers, of all ages...
第 155 頁 - Fields, Or some secreted Island, heaven knows where ! But in the very world, which is the world Of all of us, — the place where in the end We find our happiness, or not at all ! XXXII.

書目資訊