Speech of Sir R.P... Delivered... July 6, 1849, On the State of the Nation

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J. Bain, 1849 - 60 頁

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第 32 頁 - It is the maxim of every prudent master of a family never to attempt to make at home what it will cost him more to make than to buy.
第 35 頁 - That the maxim of buying in the cheapest market, and selling in the dearest, which regulates every merchant in his individual dealings, is strictly applicable, as the best rule for the trade of the whole nation.
第 32 頁 - What is prudence in the conduct of every private family, can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom. If a foreign country can supply us with a commodity cheaper than we ourselves can make it, better buy it of them with some part of the produce of our oWn industry, employed in a way in which we have some advantage.
第 35 頁 - That although, as a matter of mere diplomacy, it may sometimes answer to hold out the removal of particular prohibitions, or high duties, as depending upon corresponding concessions by other states in our favour, it does not follow that we should maintain our restrictions, in cases where the desired concessions on their part cannot be obtained. Our restrictions would not be the less prejudicial to our own capital and industry, because other governments persisted in preserving impolitic regulations.
第 30 頁 - Gentleman's assumption, that you cannot fight hostile tariffs by free imports. I so totally dissent from that assumption, that I maintain that the best way to compete with hostile tariffs is to encourage free imports.
第 32 頁 - The principles which should govern the commercial intercourse of nations, do not differ from those which regulate the dealings of private individuals. It is the same law which determines the planetary movements and the fall of the slightest particle of matter to the earth. It is the same law which determines the accumulation of wealth by the private trader and the powerful kingdom. We only obscure and mystify the truth by overlooking the principle which governs the dealings of every man of common...
第 32 頁 - Let us suppose the case of two artizans or dealers resident in the same town — a shoemaker and a tailor. The one wants clothes, the other shoes : they think it right to encourage the domestic industry of their own town — to deal with each other, and not with strangers. The shoemaker gives ten shillings to the tailor for a certain quantity of clothes, which he could get for seven shillings if he bought them in a neighbouring town. But, by way of compensation, the tailor gives him his custom, and...
第 32 頁 - ... prudence in the conduct of every private family, can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom.' " Now, let us consider the case of two artisans or dealers, resident in the same town. The shoemaker and the tailor will answer the purpose as well as any other. The one wants clothes, the other shoes ; they think it right to encourage the domestic industry of their own town, to deal with each other and not with strangers. The shoemaker gives ten shillings to a tailor for a certain quantity of clothes,...
第 30 頁 - In bringing forward the present motion, the honourable gentleman the member for Buckinghamshire (Mr. Disraeli) was equally explicit. He observed, speaking of our recent legislation, "That we have established a new commercial system, which mistakes the principles upon which a profitable exchange can take place between nations ; that we can only encounter the hostile tariffs of foreign countries by countervailing duties ; that such a system occasions not scarcity and dearness, but cheapness and abundance....
第 30 頁 - in enforcing the principles upon which the theory of reciprocity in commerce depends, I have laboured under the disadvantage of appealing only to abstract reasoning ; now, however, we have practical results before us in the sufferings of our people and in the decline of our wealth.

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