Proceedings at the ... Annual Dinner of the Republican Club of the City of New York

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第 19 頁 - All of those may be turned against us without making us weaker for the struggle. Our reliance is in the love of liberty which God has planted in us. Our...
第 19 頁 - Our reliance is in the love of liberty which God has planted in us. Our defense is in the spirit which prizes liberty as the heritage of all men, in all lands everywhere.
第 36 頁 - Like clouds that rake the mountainsummits, Or waves that own no curbing hand. How fast has brother followed brother From sunshine to the sunless land ! Yet I, whose lids from infant slumber Were earlier raised, remain to hear A timid voice, that asks in whispers, " Who next will drop and disappear...
第 21 頁 - Most people can bear adversity, but if you wish to know what a man really is, give him power. This is the supreme test. It is the glory of Lincoln that, having almost absolute power, he never abused it except on the side of mercy. Wealth could not purchase it, power could not awe this divine, this loving man.
第 18 頁 - If you wish to be sublime you must be natural — you must keep close to the grass. You must sit by the fireside of the heart : above the clouds it is too cold. You must be simple in your speech : too much polish suggests insincerity. The great orator idealizes the real, transfigures the common, makes...
第 19 頁 - The elocutionists believe in the virtue of voice, the sublimity of syntax, the majesty of long sentences, and the genius of gesture. The orator loves the real, the simple, the natural. He places the thought above all. He knows that the greatest ideas should be expressed in the shortest words — that the greatest statues need the least drapery.
第 16 頁 - He stands alone— no ancestors, no fellows, and no successors. He had the advantage of living in a new country, of social equality, of personal freedom, of seeing in the horizon of his future the perpetual star of hope. He preserved his individuality and his self-respect. He knew and mingled with men of every kind; and, after all, men are the best books. He became acquainted with the ambitions and hopes of the heart, the means used to accomplish ends, the springs of action and the seeds of thought....
第 19 頁 - Lincoln was an immense personality — firm but not obstinate. Obstinacy is egotism — firmness, heroism. He influenced others without effort, unconsciously; and they submitted to him as men submit to nature, unconsciously. He was severe with himself, and for that reason lenient with others. He appeared to apologize for being kinder than his fellows. He did merciful things as stealthily as others committed crimes. Almost ashamed of tenderness, he said and did the noblest words and deeds with that...
第 18 頁 - ... must keep close to the grass. You must sit by the fireside of the heart; above the clouds it is too cold. You must be simple in your speech; too much polish suggests insincerity. The great orator idealizes the real, transfigures the common, makes even the inanimate throb and thrill, fills the gallery of the imagination with statues and pictures perfect in form and color, brings to light the gold hoarded by memory the miser, shows the glittering coin to the spendthrift hope, enriches the brain,...
第 21 頁 - Nothing discloses real character like the use of power. It is easy for the weak to be gentle. Most people can bear adversity. But if you wish to know what a man really is, give him power. This is the supreme test.

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