History of New England, 第 1 卷

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Little, Brown, 1858
 

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第 165 頁 - Having undertaken for the Glory of God. and Advancement of the Christian Faith, and the Honour of our King and Country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the northern Parts of Virginia; do by these Presents, solemnly and mutually in the Presence of God and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil Body Politick, for our better Ordering and Preservation, and Furtherance of the Ends aforesaid...
第 45 頁 - Lo, the poor Indian, whose untutored mind Sees God in clouds, and hears Him in the wind...
第 270 頁 - The King willeth that right be done according to the laws and customs of the realm ; and that the statutes be put in due execution, that his subjects may have no cause to complain of any wrong or oppressions, contrary to their just rights and liberties, to the preservation whereof he holds himself as well obliged as of his prerogative.
第 623 頁 - WHEREAS we all came into these parts of America with one and the same end and aim, namely, to advance the kingdom of our Lord Jesus Christ, and to enjoy the liberties- of the gospel in purity with peace...
第 423 頁 - We whose names are hereunder, desirous to inhabit in the town of Providence, do promise to subject ourselves in active or passive obedience to all such orders or agreements as shall be made for public good of the body, in an orderly way, by the major assent of the present inhabitants, masters of families, incorporated together into a town fellowship, and such others whom they shall admit unto them, only in civil things.
第 414 頁 - The magistrate is not to meddle with religion, or matters of conscience, nor compel men to this or that form of religion; because Christ is the King and Lawgiver of the Church and Conscience.
第 138 頁 - Being thus apprehended, they were hurried from one place to another, and from one justice to another, until, in the end, they knew not what to do with them.
第 2 頁 - Indian race, from the mouth of the St. Lawrence to the mouth of the Mississippi, had become estranged from the English and friendly to the French.
第 158 頁 - The next day, the wind being fair, they went aboard, and their friends with them, where truly doleful was the sight...
第 438 頁 - ... in the infancy of plantation, justice should be administered with more lenity than in a settled state, because people were then more apt to transgress, partly of ignorance of new laws and orders, partly through oppression of business and other straits...

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